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Discussion Starter #1
This article, published in the Veterinary journal in march 2019 and of which Dr Dodds is co-author, shows saliva and blood tests are not reliable to detect food allergies in dogs and elimination diet is the reference standard.

»There was no clear difference in the number of positive reactions between the allergic dogs and healthy dogs from a research population. »

 

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And this includes food "sensitivity" tests like Nutriscan, right? A lot of money getting spent every day on these sorts of tests for pets and humans alike. :(

But at least there are tests that can help identify environmental allergies. I can still remember how itchy mine made me.
 

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I seem to recall someone here saying their insurance covered it. That strikes me as odd if they're not accurate. Hard to get straight answers on this topic. If they don't work, they really shouldn't even be available.
I think there are a lot of grey areas on this topic. Some people say it’s worked for them, there must be a reason for it. Maybe the results are valid for dogs who are allergic, but not for healthy dogs ? If that males sense... Although I’ve read many articles on the subject, invalidating them.
 

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I’m not surprised, they are unreliable for humans too.

i Personally have been on the gold standard, an elimination diet and I can tell you it’s not easy, very boring but effective. Trying to sort out allergies and intolerances to food is hard but when you Do you then feel the work was with it.
 
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