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Local vet is advocating a stomach tack for our 5 moth old standard poodle, to be done while he's getting neutered. What is it? And why would it be recommended?
 

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Sry, should have said that 'Bloat', 'Torsion', and 'Gastropexy', are the words you should be reading up on for the rest of your answer.
You'll find a LOT of discussion on them right here in PF.
 

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Sry, should have said that 'Bloat', 'Torsion', and 'Gastropexy', are the words you should be reading up on for the rest of your answer.
You'll find a LOT of discussion on them right here in PF.
Yup, you got it.

We chose to get a Gastropexy for our male poodle when he was neutered. It was a tough decision, because the cost is substantial. However, it seemed likely enough that bloat could occur, and if it does, things can go downhill very quickly.
 

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Bloat really scares me because we do not have a local emergency vet. And emergencies don't seem to respect business hours!

I'll do some research here.

Rkj, do you recall how much it cost?
I don’t recall exactly. I want to say it was in the neighbourhood of $2,000 CAD.


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Local vet is advocating a stomach tack for our 5 moth old standard poodle, to be done while he's getting neutered. What is it? And why would it be recommended?
I lost my first Standard to bloat/torsion many, many years ago and it is an absolutely awful thing to go through, both for the dog firstly, but also for you as an owner. She was 13 1/2 at the time and not a surgical candidate and she suffered terribly until I could get to the local ER in the middle of the night. Once determined she could not be saved, I just wanted her to be euthanized as soon as possible to end her pain.

Prophylactic gastropexies were not really discussed when I had my 2nd Standard, who I let go at 15 for different issues. But when I got my current older girl, my breeder discussed with me and I discussed with my vet and I chose to have her pexied when I spayed her (I don't spay my bitches until around 2 for various reasons, I let them have a heat, make sure their growth plates are closed, etc.). But also, at that age, their stomachs are fully grown, I would not want to pexy a dog that was not done growing. I also did a pexy on my younger dog when I got her from the same breeder.

While a dog with a gastropexy can still bloat, they should not torsion (possible, but not likely), and you will have precious extra time to get to the vet with a likely much more favorable outcome as bloat is still a medical emergency which requires immediate vet attention. And the treatment for a dog which bloats is a tack anyway. Some vets don't believe in tacking as they consider it unnecessary surgery. My vet was totally on board with doing the pexies, as she said, she would much rather do the surgery on a young healthy dog (obviously only on breeds at high risk for bloat) than one who comes in already compromised and in bloat. Considering Standards are in the top 5 breeds likely to bloat, I figure anything I can do to stack the odds in my favor is a good thing. I can't tell you how many times I have read posts from people that lost a Standard to bloat because they were too far gone to even do surgery on or who were not strong enough to make it through the surgery or recovery, who said they were unaware how prone the breed is to bloat and that such a thing as a prophylactic gastropexy is available for consideration.

Of course, everyone must weigh all factors and make their own decisions, but I am happy I made the choice I did for my girls.....
 

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Really, to be concise, most of our views run counter to those of your vet. New learning has shown that it takes time for the larger bones, hip mostly, but also skull bones, to 'knit'. And to knit properly, certain hormones are necessary. So we prefer to not cut off any supply of hormones until that stage.
A year and a half????

Regarding a 'Pexy - Gastropexy
Recommended for all deep-chested breeds.
The preferred(?) method now is Laparoscopic, rather than opening up the dog with a scalpel.
They would go in thru a tube and put a small stitch (a 'tack') to sew the bowel to the rib lining. Tissue from the bowel and lining will then 'repair' that site with more tissue, eventually making a strong bond.
So that the bowel will never 'flop' over and twist (torsion), cutting off any flow thru the bowel. Creating 'bloat'... they seriously blow up like a football.

Me??? I'd wait 'til a year and a half then get both the neuter and 'pexy done laparoscopically.
 

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I'm so sorry you lost your spoo to bloat, Eclipse. I can only imagine the trauma you and your dog suffered.

Unfortunately, I had to have Maizie pexied/spayed when she was barely 10 mos., as she had to have the emergency gastrotomy at that time when she swallowed the toy. I wish I could have waited until she was a little older. But, it is what it is.

Frosty had laparoscopic gastropexy when he was neutered. He healed SO FAST. After 5 days, he was cleared for exercise!
 

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Now I'm looking into laparoscopic pexy/spay options, too. We'd have to travel a couple of hours to a surgical center, but sounds worth it.

Do you think the benefits of laparoscopy outweigh the negatives of having her surgery performed in an unfamiliar setting?
 

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Now I'm looking into laparoscopic pexy/spay options, too. We'd have to travel a couple of hours to a surgical center, but sounds worth it.

Do you think the benefits of laparoscopy outweigh the negatives of having her surgery performed in an unfamiliar setting?
100% worth it. The surgeon is much more important than the familiarity of setting.
 

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100% worth it. The surgeon is much more important than the familiarity of setting.
Having a prophylactic Gastropexy is the platinum standard of preventative veterinary medicine. For females, it’s in the same neighborhood as a spay, for males it’s not. Whatever you decide is the right call for your poodle. I opted not to do Buck, having done a deep dive into the statistics. I was told by an Irish Setter breeder, “Honey, your dog is more likely to die of cancer”, which clenched it for me. I know the signs, have Gas-X on hand and two emergency rooms close by.
 

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Standard poodles have a lifetime risk of 4% for GDV. Our old girl bloated and had middle of the night emergency surgery. Fortunately she was a drama queen and decided to stand next to the bed and retch into my ear when she became uncomfortable. She did well, but it was a slow recovery at almost 11.

Our new guy is eight months old and we're probably going to have a lap pexy done when he's full grown. Right now he's free feeding and picks at his food all day long, so if he can continue to do that and maintain his weight, we may rethink it. It also looks like he's going to be a little squirt when he's done growing, but I'm not sure if that will be somewhat protective or not.
 

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I had my Gracie’s stomach tacked when she was spayed. I also put her food in slow feed bowls. I had never heard of bloat until I saw Marley & Me.
 
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