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Welcome! So sorry to hear about Dixie. Would love to hear stories about her and see some photos when you feel like reminiscing. :)

We live in a popular retirement destination, and there are quite a few elderly spoo owners around here. Since you'd be the primary caretaker and not your mother, you won't face many of the challenges they do. But one thing that could be problematic are those razorsharp teeth. Spoos especially seem to love grabbing hands, and by adolescence, they don't even have to jump to do it. Peggy inadvertently made both my parents bleed.

Our neighbour is in his mid-80s and similarly struggles with his friends' doodle. His skin tears easily and he always comes home from visiting them with puncture wounds.

A spoo could also easily knock your mother over, so I'd personally lean towards a mini. They are so agile and aware. Accidents can still happen, of course, but I think your mother is just as likely to trip over a spoo, and much more likely to get knocked or pulled over by one.

Either way, I'd probably not have her walk your puppy on a leash, as I think the leash poses the biggest fall risk. And I'd be asking for a mellow pick from your breeder.
 

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One thing I do know for a fact though,, repeat buyers of her pup’s from this one particular female are put on a waiting list for her next litter due to the calm nature and extremely mild temperaments her pup’s have as this is her last litter than that particular female is being retired.
Sign me up for one, too, please! Lol.

I think whichever poodle you choose will be a wonderful daytime companion for your mom. And the spoo bark will absolutely make her feel safe! But those needle teeth plus springs-for-legs is something she will need to be prepared for. And it'll get worse before it gets better. Possibly a couple of years of worse.

(As I type this, my 14-month-old spoo is sleeping soundly next to me, and has been for most of the day. But it was a journey to get here, and I know the journey's not over yet. My best recommendation is an excellent indoor crate/exercise pen combo, plus puppy classes followed by basic obedience with a positive reinforcement trainer.)
 

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I would not recommend getting a spoo without doing at least a good puppy class. This is even more important during covid, because organic socialization opportunities have been dramatically reduced.

I didn't do any formal training or classes with my mini mix, but she was a piece of cake compared to Peggy: I could take her everywhere. Socialization was a breeze. Everyone who saw her just started cooing. The world was her oyster!

We've had a few spoos and minis in our classes for me to directly compare, and the minis are consistently more gregarious, while the spoos are busy, but watchful. I think they could easily become overly wary of strangers if not actively socialized in a positive way.

Ian Dunbar would be the best resource for doing this without the help of a trainer.
 

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My mini got the zoomies, but even if she was inside, they were just cute and funny because she was small.

Everything is amplified with a spoo. People can't believe Peggy weighs so little, because those long legs just give her a real horse vibe. Lol.

But my spoo has a better off switch than the minis I know. She's a total couch potato at only 14 months.
 
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