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She is about 2.5 years old. About once a week she will urinate either in one particular area in the Dining Room and Living Room. I had a ****Zu that we gave to someone and he always went in those 2 areas. We got the Poodle later and have not been able to get her to stop. i have done truing and crate training's well. i have issue with having a HUGE crate in my house and I do not like seeing my dog crated up all of the time when we are not able to keep an eye on her, which is a lot with 3 children.
My hardwood floors are starting to ruin because of the urine setting on the floor. Sometimes I do not even see if for a few days, which is crazy because my wife vacuums the floors at least twice a week. Anyway it seems the urine has stripped the finish and has worked its way underneath staining the actual wood.
What can I do!!!???? My vet suggested folding duct tape to where it is rolled and all sides are sticky. placing them in the area on the floor and also to place Zest soap in those areas. This relates a sort of discomfort to those areas supposedly.
 

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Unless you've used an enzymatic cleaner to remove all traces of urine scent where your Shih Tzu peed before her, your Poodle will continue to believe that those areas are a designated toilet, and will continue to use them.

It sounds as though she IS housetrained, since she only pees in those areas once a week (probably when you're busy with the 3 kids, and a girl's gotta go when a girl's gotta go), and it's only in those areas your other dog used as a toilet. Get a product (like Nature's Miracle) made specifically to remove the urine smell, and clean the floors with it. Even if YOU can't smell it, dogs can.

See: http://www.naturemakesitwork.com/home/index.php
 

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I definitely recommend professional cleaning of the offending spot, and deny your dog access to that area of the house. Baby gates can be very helpful for this. If you keep your dog from ever going near the spot for several months, you interrupt the habit she has of wandering over there. When you finally do allow full access again, KEEP AN EYE ON HER! Make sure no one forgets about her-- if she hasn't been out in a while, take her out just to be sure. No dog should ever be left unsupervised so long that they cannot hold their bladder.
 

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Unless you've used an enzymatic cleaner to remove all traces of urine scent where your Shih Tzu peed before her, your Poodle will continue to believe that those areas are a designated toilet, and will continue to use them.
See: http://www.naturemakesitwork.com/home/index.php
This I agree with using. BUT you must make some temporary changes to also eliminate the problem. If a crate works, you need to go that route. once you put this product on the floor you have to leave it for up to 2 weeks to pull the smell up and the dog cannot be around the area. So you will need to block those areas off.

Bottom line with animals doing their business in the house you have no choice but to make some additional changes. I would use furniture, gates, whatever I needed to treat and block off the area and fix the problem, if not then you may be giving the poodle away too:eek:hwell:.......I am not trying to be rude but this is an issue. A 2 year old poodle that is "house trained" would not do be doing this.
 

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Have you ever caught her and scolded her? Poodles are pretty smart if you tell them no on something often times they will listen but they don't know NOT to do something if it's not told to them.
 

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I was in a similar situation. In the end, turned out my puppy knew that outside was the place to go, he just didn't know how to get my attention to let me know that he needs 'out'. He won't scratch on our glass door, because we've discouraged that on other doors. (whoops, won't make that mistake again!).

Anyway, once I started really watching him, I realised sometimes he'd sit quietly by the door, but not looking very comfortable. On those occasions I let him out, and whatdayaknow, he peed! Still haven't figured out how to get him to be a little 'bolder' with his asking, but then we haven't had an inside accident for a loooooooong time now so I guess what works, works :)
 

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I agree with the others. This dog is house-broken. It just thinks it is OK to potty in certain places in the house.

If the dog is always going in the same wrong place, you need to keep the dog out of that area. Is there no way to close off these rooms?

Besides treating with an enzyme cleaner, I would use skat-mats. You can make these yourself by going to an office supply store and getting the mats that go under an office chair. The underside of these mats is sharp and pokey. Cut them to cover the entire area that is being fouled. You can also get some spray called "Get Off My Lawn" which has a scent that many dogs don't like.

The combination of cleaning, painful footing, and unpleasant smell should keep this girl away from her potty areas. Hopefully you can change her behavior.
 

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I was in a similar situation. In the end, turned out my puppy knew that outside was the place to go, he just didn't know how to get my attention to let me know that he needs 'out'. He won't scratch on our glass door, because we've discouraged that on other doors. (whoops, won't make that mistake again!).

Anyway, once I started really watching him, I realised sometimes he'd sit quietly by the door, but not looking very comfortable. On those occasions I let him out, and whatdayaknow, he peed! Still haven't figured out how to get him to be a little 'bolder' with his asking, but then we haven't had an inside accident for a loooooooong time now so I guess what works, works :)
Flash used to be very subtle about his outside cues. To get him to be more bold, I turned it into a trick. First i taught him that the word "outside" means I'm going to open the door. Then I put his favorite toy outside (you can use treats for this if your dog works better for food) and let him get excited about it. I said "outside" in a questioning tone, and opened the door when he showed excitement. Eventually you teach him that if he shows excitement, the door will open and he gets the toy.
Now he'll walk over and look at me expectantly, and I ask him "outside?" If he gets excited (cocks his head, woofs softly, or moves toward the door) then I go let him out. If he doesn't react, I don't open the door. He learned pretty quick that he can "answer" my question and get what he wants.
 

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If this was my dog I would approach the problem on several fronts.

First a trip to the vet for Urinalysis to see if there is a medical reason (bladder infection?) for this problem.

Meanwhile every "pee" spot in the house must be cleaned w/a urine removal product (Natures Miracle, Outright etc.) Its been said that dogs can smell 1 drop of urine in a gallon of water! You may need to clean those area several times. Keep the dog out of those areas when wet or dry for a least a few months. Consider using area rugs over the spots if possible in the future, changing the surface may help to change the behavior.


I would treat her like a puppy and take her outside on leash to potty outside several times a day. I would use a command like "go potty" and praise her when she "goes" and give a treat if she's food motivated. It's very important to out with her so you can praise and reinforce proper behavior. Eventually you will be able to make her "potty" on command. When you know she's 'empty' bring her inside. Give her some family time. Again treat her like puppy, have her on leash next to you while the family watches TV or put her on a DOWN/STAY by your side if she going to be in rooms that she's peed in before.

If you cannot be in the room to watch the dog you MUST either confine her or block her from the areas where she's been peeing. Crates, baby gates, show exercise pens; maybe rearrange the furniture for a while etc. Crating the dog is not bad you're giving her a small space or area to call her own, and a quiet place to get away from the kids; depending on their ages this could be very important. If it's a wire crate throw a sheet over it for privacy and to stop sad looks from those Poodle eyes (they know how to manipulate you). Set up her bed or blanket and give her a chew toy and go do the things you need to for your family. You must decide right now that you will not give this dog another opportunity to pee in those spots, period.

Another thing you might try is buying bells to hang on your door. Dogs can be trained to ring bells hanging from the doorknob to indicate their need to go out. They are sold at some pet store w/instructions. (Poodles love to do tricks for attention). With 3 kids you may be to busy to notice her signal to go out so she has no choice but to go in the house.

Hope some of these ideas help. But remember its going to take several months to change her behavior (habits). How long does it takes us humans to change ours? And we're suppose to be smarter!:)
 

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Oh yes, I highly recommend the bell. I started this when Jackson arrived and it is the first thing he learned that Hoot didn't teach him. I just hung some tiny chimes on the door knob and every time we went out I would ring them. One day I heard a little chime and there was Jackson, waiting to be let out.
 

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I just wanted to add that once you get it cleaned, can you covered these two spots up to make the temporarily inaccessible? Perhaps a piece of furniture blocking them? Long enough for her to get out of this habit, just in case...
 

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Urinalysis is OK.
I have caught her and scolder her. She knows it is wrong. The night I posted this I had let her outside to potty and play. i saw her potty and I closed the door for her to run round some. about 10 minutes later she was at the door ready to come in. When she came in she went to her bed for 2 seconds then sneaked off and peed in my living room. SHE WAS JUST OUTSIDE AND I SAW HER PEE!!!! DanG DOG!!!!
It is not possible to block off the areas she is going.
 

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Urinalysis is OK.
I have caught her and scolder her. She knows it is wrong. The night I posted this I had let her outside to potty and play. i saw her potty and I closed the door for her to run round some. about 10 minutes later she was at the door ready to come in. When she came in she went to her bed for 2 seconds then sneaked off and peed in my living room. SHE WAS JUST OUTSIDE AND I SAW HER PEE!!!! DanG DOG!!!!
It is not possible to block off the areas she is going.
So there is part of the solution there. You need to stop letting her out and start TAKING HER OUT. Give her the potty command, watch her go and PRAISE PRAISE PRAISE!!!!! TREAT TREAT TREAT!!!! Let potty time become an "exercise" that she gets to perform. This way, she is more likely to hold it so that she can please you.

Also, you say that you can not block off the living room. Well sure you can. Get 2-3 (or 4-5) xpens. Spread them out so that they cover the openings to your living room. Yes, I know they look unsightly, but how badly do you want to fix this problem?

Frankly, since this is the 2nd dog who has had this problem, the issue is really yours. I think you owe it to the dog to do whatever it takes to break the habit you allowed to form.
 

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So there is part of the solution there. You need to stop letting her out and start TAKING HER OUT. Give her the potty command, watch her go and PRAISE PRAISE PRAISE!!!!! TREAT TREAT TREAT!!!! Let potty time become an "exercise" that she gets to perform. This way, she is more likely to hold it so that she can please you.

We have had great success training both our spoos in the exact manner as described by cbrand. Our 8.5 mos old does his business on command, but we always go out with him to potty. Our eldest just comes up and stares at you when he needs to go out. So, keeping a keen eye on the body language is essential. We also use a lot of praise from the moment our pups come into our home regarding house training and all other forms of training as well.
Well wishes for success !
 

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Asking to go out

I was in a similar situation. In the end, turned out my puppy knew that outside was the place to go, he just didn't know how to get my attention to let me know that he needs 'out'. He won't scratch on our glass door, because we've discouraged that on other doors. (whoops, won't make that mistake again!).

Anyway, once I started really watching him, I realised sometimes he'd sit quietly by the door, but not looking very comfortable. On those occasions I let him out, and whatdayaknow, he peed! Still haven't figured out how to get him to be a little 'bolder' with his asking, but then we haven't had an inside accident for a loooooooong time now so I guess what works, works :)
I had a similar issue, not wanting the dog to scratch the door or bark to go out, so I hung a little bell at nose height by the door. Every time I took him out, I rang the bell. After about a week, he trained himself to ring the bell to go out. It does mean that EVERY time he rings the bell, at least at first, you have to go and let them out, even if you know the dog doesn't have to eliminate. When he had less bladder control and couldn't make it through the night, we used to hear him thump down the stairs at 1 am, then lie waiting in agony for the 'ding, ding, ding'. And fight over who had to get up and let him out. :)
 

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Have you tried the tether method? In addition to cleaning with an enzymatic cleaner, when she isn't in the crate, or when those areas aren't blocked off, keep a leash on her and hook the end of the leash to your belt loop. That way, she's always being supervised and doesn't have a chance to go to those spots without you. When you take her outside, let her off lead and wait for her to do her business. After she does, have a huge potty party outside. Let her know she's amazing for going. If you aren't watching, you have no idea if she just went or not, and then she'll come in and go on your floor. I'm not sure if a doggie door is possible, or even a good idea in your situation, but sometimes that helps a lot, so she can just go out by herself when she needs to and you don't have to play doggie butler. She definitely can't be expected to figure it out just from yelling at her though, she has to be shown, it takes a lot of work and effort on your part.
 
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