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Discussion Starter #1
ive been trying to find the right dog for me but i have to say that standard poodles are kinda hard to find.i found this rescue group but the foster lady made up her mind when she heard that i live in a apartment and said NO :( but i wont let that discourage me ;)

do you guys know anyone or any good rescue with standard poodles? a person who is just in a unfortunate circumstance would probably be better since i find rescue groups to be too demanding. dont get me wrong. i understand the process they suppose to follow but most of them are just fanatics that makes it so hard and complicated....or i may just be getting frustrated. i dont know. :smow:

anyways, i really hope this forum would make my hunt alot easier. so if you guys know anyone please let me know :)

thanks so much.
-B
 

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Rescue folks can be tough nuts to crack. The rescue here in Colorado won't let you adopt if you rent or own a condo/townhouse. They also won't let families adopt who have children under age 5.

I think your best bet is to lurk on Petfinder and to contact various breeders to let them know you are interested in a retired show dog.
 

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There's reasons why rescues are hard to crack.

1- people who rent- period- are a high # of our returned dogs in the rescue i work with
2-placements that don't work out- often have kids in the house (or planned in near future- it sucks but it's the truth).

townhouse is a bit tough- but again you run into condo boards with them. Our rescue doesn't care about townhouses- but wouldn't place a standard in an apartment- not done around here- no good places to walk- and not an appropriate home for that type of dog IMO (Yes it works- but these aren't people we "KNOW"
 

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Yes, I am afraid I have to agree with neVar. I often check used usedregina and the most common reason for wanting to rehome a dog is "we have a new baby and I don't have the time."

I can't understand how you could have a dog that was part of the family for years and then just "discard" it because you have another member of the family.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
oh i totally understand...
but this lady didn't even asked me if
how long have we been living here
how big the place is
if im even married
if im even old enough to be even be thinking of marriage
who am i living with and if there are even any children in the house
etc....
the tone of her voice suddenly changed when the word "apartment" pop out. her mind was set was to say NO no matter what. i know what were getting ourselves(me and my parents) into and know the responsibilities behind it when we decided to have a dog in the house. but some people just take this love for animals a little too far.
 

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Standards are pretty big and pretty active. Since you are obviously looking at adults who were given up, the rescue lady doesn't want to dog placed with you end up turning out coming back into rescue. I would not personally feel settled in my heart that placing a dog in an aprtment setting is doing the best thing for your dog....I would want you to have a real house & fenced yard
 

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Respectfully disagree...

I would want you to have a real house & fenced yard

As someone who lived with a large, active dog (Joey) in both houses and apartments (and honestly, we never really had a fenced yard), I have to say that apartments can be great for dogs- even big, active ones. After all, apartment dwellers don't have the option of putting Fido out in their fenced back yard and ignoring him. You HAVE to walk him.

Plus, if you live in an apartment complex, you run into all of the other people who are walking THEIR dogs. A bunch of us once banded together, and started our own little doggy play group. We'd go together to a nearby dog park, and let our dogs play together. Or, we'd simply go out to the VERY big lawn in our apartment complex, and let all of our dogs run around. It wasn't fenced in* (and there were no nearby cars), but we all trained our dogs to come when we called them, and we never had a problem.

In the last house Joey and I lived in together, we still went on plenty of walks(and sought out fun parks to explore), but instead of forming doggy play groups with anyone, what we encountered were a bunch of dogs barking enviously at Joey from within their fenced yards. We rarely ran into other people out walking their dogs.

Joey was initially my family's dog, living in a house with a yard- I myself wondered if an apartment was a good place for my 'large, active' dog to live. Much to my surprise, Joey was HAPPIER living in an apartment, for all of the reasons I sighted above.

With regards to the stats of people returning their dogs- it's not about where they live, or how much money they make, or their family circumstances- it's about their understanding of the responsibility they are taking on, and the content of their character.

Here's the best question to ask a prospective owner: Under what circumstances would you return your dog?

If they answer anything other than "I am dead," don't let them adopt a dog.



*As I re-read this, 'a very big lawn' doesn't do this area justice. It had to be at least two acres, AND it had a pond in it. We also watched our dogs intently while they played. If someone started to look like they were about to start wandering, we called them back, and leashed them. Anyway, we only did this a few times- mostly, we went to the dog park.
 

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Gogreen I understand your frustration completely. I looked into rescue and wasn't able to find anything but Poodle/Lab mixes in my immediate area. When I answered the one ad I did find, the responses started to get weird. I suggest keeping an eye on local shelters, CL and other classified sites. Many city run shelters will put your name on file in case a Poodle ever does come in. I don't see myself ever going through the a private rescue organization. I disagree that there is a magic formula to finding a good home. (House and fenced in yard don't always equal commited adopters.) Many times those people w/ a house and a yard just throw the dog in the yard to exercise itself. People who rent have to take the dog out on a leash and exercise it. There are ball parks, dog parks, friends and families' homes and other options for off leash exercise. I live in a house w/ a yard and yet I don't like to leave my guys out unless I'm going to be home and close to a window where I can see/hear them.
 

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THe problem isn't that a lot of people can be GREAT owners and give the dogs AWESOME lives in an apartment.

It's the fact that a good chunk don't. Dog barks when home alone? Voila dog comes back to rescue because the neighbours complained in a house? nope no one's going to complain you dont' hear it the same.

It's the same with small children. yes many work out great. Sadly a good chunk don't- which means more dogs coming back.
 

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But isn't that the problem. Instead of looking deeper to see if the renter or parent will be commited, they are written off and often left w/ a bad taste in their mouth when it comes to rescue. Not to mention the dog that could've gone to them is still in rescue and time is running out for the dog at the pound that could've gone into rescue.
 

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It's the fact that a good chunk don't. Dog barks when home alone? Voila dog comes back to rescue because the neighbours complained in a house? nope no one's going to complain you dont' hear it the same.

It's the same with small children. yes many work out great. Sadly a good chunk don't- which means more dogs coming back.
Like in so many other aspects of life, it's sad that that large chunk that don't work out ruin it for the ones who would work out. However, I can definitely see where the rescues are coming from. . . better safe than sorry.
 

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I can understand your frustration and also see the other side.
People who rent typically move more often that owners and are at the whim of the landlord. We moved cross country 3 years ago and wanted to rent a house to get a good feel for the area before we bought. It was almost impossible to find a house to rent because we had a dog and a cat. Finding a rental with pets is difficult at best and impossible at worst.
We did end up finding a short term rental, paid a huge deposit and the landlord wanted to meet our dog before even considering letting us fill out an application. We've owned since 1995 so this was a huge pain for us. It's just not easy to rent with animals.

We bought our 5mo poodle puppy from a breeder because the rescue here won't adopt to anyone with a child under 10 years old.
Nevermind that I've had dogs my entire life, worked with animals for 20 years, been a foster home for Seattle Animal Control, own a home with a fenced yard in a good neighborhood, am in a committed marriage, and understand the breed after having a poodle for 13 years. None of that mattered to them. I have a 6 year old and a 3 year old. The only poodle rescue within driving distance for us charges $500 for a dog. I know that isn't much compared to how much a well bred puppy costs. With a well bred puppy you feel like you're paying up front instead of at the vet. These dogs were $500 and from questionable blood lines if the pedigree was known at all. It totally left a bad taste in my mouth.

We are doing just fine, thank you very much, handling a 6 year old, a 3 year old and a Standard Poodle puppy. :)
I may consider rescue down the line when the kids are older but right now I'm very annoyed with the only Spoo rescue organization here.
 

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I'm actually going to agree with Harley...<3

We as a family were denied by a Great Pyrenees rescue because we live in a one story ranch on 1.5 acres of land with a 4.5foot fence...the woman gave us this heehaw that we weren't equipped for a great Pyrenees because we don't live on 10 or more acres... though we have experience with the breed ((a rescue from when I was 10-12ish...she died when I was 15 =\))

needless to say we were all disappointed to find out they placed one in a family with a farm who turned around and allowed it to be placed back in the rescue 3 months after I got Elphie

I dunno, I love rescues and ALL of our dogs have been rescue dogs ((Except for Elphie)) but the experience we had with the great pyr rescue left a nasty taste in our mouths, it must be one of those learning experiences I hear about... XD
 

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But isn't that the problem. Instead of looking deeper to see if the renter or parent will be commited, they are written off and often left w/ a bad taste in their mouth when it comes to rescue. Not to mention the dog that could've gone to them is still in rescue and time is running out for the dog at the pound that could've gone into rescue.
I have long wished that rescues would take the time to look beyond the superficial.

For years, until he died of cancer, I had a high-energy Golden in a condo, and he had a great life. As someone else said, when you have a dog in a condo, you HAVE to walk him.

On the other hand, I know one family that has a big house, someone home during the day, and a big fenced yard. They adopted a big GSD. And you know what? That dog has a crappy life. He never gets to go anywhere, he gets no attention, he might as well be a piece of lawn furniture. But on paper, this family looks like a great proposition to a rescue.

Drives me nuts.
 

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I can see both sides of this issue, and also think they need to look deeper into the individual.

Like my son and his family. they decided to adopt a dog and wanted a Basenji...
needless to say, Basenji are not the dog for everyone.

My son is career Navy, has 2 children, has not actually owned a dog (we had family dogs) they keeps the 'house' spotless...and he lives on a 38' sailboat...no yard

He applied to rescue for a 10 year old dog, because they wanted a nice mature dog. rescue sent a person out with a Basenji for a home check. very detailed on how each situation would be handled, such as if the dog could get out of the cabin, life jackets, food, where the dog sleeps.

They ended up getting 'Jack" and now all the sailing pictures are mostly about the dog...LOL

I'm thinking many of the rescue don't have the manpower to do extensive checking.
 

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I think the home inspections should look more into the history of the person trying to adopt. Even though some are returned, maybe IF they took their living history into consideration they might find a better fit.

Also I am noticing more and more rentals ARE accepting pets with heafty deposits.

If renting - how long?
Should you need to move, what are you options and where would you move that accepted pets?
Do you have a pet deposit? How much is the deposit? Show proof of paying the deposit.

I do understand both sides too.
 

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i got my male cairn through a breed rescue.

they wanted people familiar with the breed. they want someone stable so that the dog doesn't end up back in rescue. they didn't want small children because small children can be real jerks to dogs.

i had to go through a written application, a phone interview, vet check AND 3 personal references and then a home inspection.

i also had to really work hard to convince them that although i had a child under 8 in the home, she was familiar w/ cairn terriers since we already had a cairn.

it was a pain, but i'm glad they did that because these little fellows are often gotten because they are so cute and people don't realize that terriers are very busy and require a lot of work.

i now have done home inspections for the cairn rescue in my area.

anyway, it's frustrating esp when you KNOW you are going to be a great dog momma, but be glad they do that.
 

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it's very tough being on the rescue side. Yes i do thin some re WAY to picky. I had an aussie last yer- again nother 'no one else would foster" and i gotta say the family i ended up placing her with was not on my list at all for this dog. it was due to personal recommediation from someone who knew me nd them that got me to look past their application. ended up being a great home for her.

we do interviews (the foster home) a home inspection n check references. and it's still a cross your fingers nd hope to god it's the right home
 

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Those are inspiring stories, about rescues groups that went the extra mile to make a placement work. I know that it's difficult for some; if you see case after case of abuse or neglect of your chosen breed, it MUST sour you on people.

But there's a mismatch in the message ... we tell people over and over "adopt from a rescue", "don't buy a dog", etc., then they show up at a rescue with bright shining eyes, ready to do their part to make the world a better place for all, only to be sneered at by a rescue group that will only ever place a dog in an absolutely perfect home as per their very high standards. Adoptee thinks they are being kicked in the teeth while trying to do the rescue a favour, rescue feel certain they are doing adoptees a favour by even considering their poor pathetic excuse for a dog home, and everyone feels slighted.

I'm exaggerating; I'm sure rescues don't sneer, but that's what it feels like to the poor aspiring dog owner. Then they go buy a puppy from the pet shop, the poor thing has serious behaviour or health issues and is unmanageable and ends up in rescue and the whole silly cycle continues.

Apologies, I get a bit over-excited sometimes.
 
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it's frustrating

I just experienced this when I contacted our two local poodle rescues about possibly adopting at sometime in the future. I've competed in rally, obedience, agility, and herding with some of my other dogs and currently have one that I'm showing in conformation....so she's intact. I emailed them and briefly explained my current dogs, what I do with them, and why one is intact to see if adopting would be possible. In both cases it was "no" because of my intact girl. While I respect that rescues are certainly entitled to set their own adoption guidelines, I found it interesting that neither one would consider any other information about me, other than the fact that I have an intact bitch. I've been involved in breed rescues for my other breeds and know about the frustration and heartbreak surrounding so many of these dogs in need. I was prepared to provide references, my vets' information, have a home inspection, tell why I wanted rescue poodle, discuss my life philosophy about dogs and why I was showing one in conformation, my thoughts on breeding, and wait until the right dog (one that would enjoy living in my household) came along. Nope...we never got that far.

Over the last few weeks, while talking to a friend who was arranging to pull and transport some dogs for rescue from a high kill shelter in another state, I noticed a black older male toy poodle, recently groomed and looking a bit bewildered, at the same shelter. I contacted a few poodle rescues and was told they didn't have room for another dog...fine....the border rescues I know can't take in every border collie, either. However, I found it ironic that this little toy was being left in a shelter due to lack of room when they wouldn't look at potential adoptive families on a case by case basis. So.....I had him pulled and he traveled south with some borders to me so I could foster him. Because he's a bitty thing (6 lbs.) I thought that he'd probably do best in a quieter home than mine. Well....over the last week he's done his best to convince me that he adores children and other dogs...and really really really wants to stay. He's about 8, groomed, has excellent bloodwork, heartworm negative, knows how to sit/down, plays fetch, is housebroken/crate trained, and is quite the little gentleman. Looks like I may have a poodle after all! :) We'll see...I want to make sure he's in the best possible place for him.

So....it can be frustrating to work with rescues that are not willing to consider individuals. There are so many dogs that need homes. I'm just glad I could help out Oliver.
 
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