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I have a 6 month old poodle and he breathes very fast when lying next to me. I’ve read it’s normal. I still get worried that he isn’t well. Is a respiration rate of 45-60 per min ok? Should I have him checked. His last vet appointment all was well, but this rapid breathing is making me nervous.
 

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Hi and Welcome!

Have you called your vet just to ask what they think? Is this always or only when he's lying next to you? Does he do it awake and asleep? or does the rate drop if he dozes or sleeps next to you?
 

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Is this is a Standard? My Standard always did this from the time he was a puppy. Was told it was normal.
 

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HI

The OP hasn't checked back in since posting. How old is your boy? Was it your vet who told you his breathing is normal? Is it all the time or only at certain times? What is his respiration rate when you feel it's up and what was he doing then or before?
 

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Hi - My Standard has since passed away, but I noticed the breathing when he was a puppy. It would happen frequently, not just after physical activity. It was the vet who told me it was normal. I don’t know what his respiration rate was. He probably did die of congestive heart failure. He had developed mitral valve disease attributed to a grain-free diet (according to the cardiologist), although according to his echocardiogram, he was not considered likely to die of congestive heart failure.
 

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I am sorry to hear this happened. I also lost one of my last girls to CHF but we did have many good years together. I hope you and your boy had that time as well.

Noel's murmur then CHF weren't related to the grain-free issue but I've looked at a lot of studies online related to it, and it seems to be not just grain free in and of itself but to the types of ingredients added in place of grains and to the proteins used. It's a deficiency of taurine which can lead to decreased heart pumping and increased heart size. The result is Dilated Cardiomyopathy which can lead to CHF. That might explain why he didn't otherwise seem likely to develop CHF.

On a quick more positive note, the pup you're looking at on your other thread is a very handsome fellow.
 
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