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I didn't want to hijack the other thread, but in it you said:
Thats why laser and glue is so much better IMO.
Can you elaborate on this? Are there different techniques I should be asking my vet about? I'm also strongly considering the profylactic surgery for bloat at the same time. Dp (Dear Puppy...LOL) will be 9 months at the end of this month so I am thinking of scheduling her surgery for January so any insight, from anyone, is most helpful.

Thank you.
 

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There are surgical lasers available that alot of people think are better. Less bleeding, less inflammation, etc. I personally have no experience in surgical lasers. We dont have one, and ive never seen one used.
 

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We don't have one either, due to the horrific cost.
We do, however, have a cold laser we use post op to help healing.

I LOVE it, I thought it was going to be such a rip-off, but it is amazing, especially in our arthritic dogs.
The thing works wonders on hot spots too.

http://www.11alive.com/life/pets/story.aspx?storyid=116204&catid=79
 

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We have one too and its Great!! I have seen so many dogs benefit from this! We had a HBC with Horrible road rash over both its front legs and sholders. The laser did a Fabulous job with helping to close and grow new skin. We use it alot.
 

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Oooh, I'm so glad you guys have one too.

Have you used it on yourself? I have!
Hahaha, I had a nasty bruise from a fall and I swear it healed in half the time, with much less swelling/pain.

I was SO skeptical about it until we started using it consistently.

We're buying a digital xray unit next.
Yikes...so expensive.
 

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There are surgical lasers available that alot of people think are better. Less bleeding, less inflammation, etc. I personally have no experience in surgical lasers. We dont have one, and ive never seen one used.
Simply put "big picture" by bigpoodleperson also adding it reduces the swelling, sutures and recovery time. It's not much different than the more advanced (or at least up to date) procedures that physicians use on people - example back and spine surgery's instead of large incisions; many female procedures as well. Another benefit with dogs is if an older dog or young adult has this procedure it is not as hard on them. Honestly it was not that much more to have my dogs done.:) Hope this helps.

For the prophylactic surgery it is very common - I have not had this done but am also considering that as well.
 

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So I should ask the vet if they use the 'laser technique' for spaying and tacking?

I'm willing to go outside our usual holistic vet to find this technique if it will help with healing and discomfort.

ETA: So is it laproscopic?
 

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No i have not "used it" on myself. I havnt had any reason to use it yet *knock on wood*, but my boss had a severe back issue that it really helped with. We have a couple Very old dogs that come in about every other week for their treatments. These dogs would of been put down a long time ago as pain meds wernt cutting it (some have even been able do decrease meds!).
 

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Is it common for vets to do a prophylactic surgery for bloat if the dog hasn't had an incident of bloat yet? I would consider having it done when I have Lucy spayed, but I know my vet is of the "practical" nature and she may say that unless there is a predispostion, or it runs in the line, or there's been an incidence of it already - she may not want to do it... Is it pretty easy to do? JW
 

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Is it common for vets to do a prophylactic surgery for bloat if the dog hasn't had an incident of bloat yet? I would consider having it done when I have Lucy spayed, but I know my vet is of the "practical" nature and she may say that unless there is a predispostion, or it runs in the line, or there's been an incidence of it already - she may not want to do it... Is it pretty easy to do? JW
I would do it during a spay in a heartbeat.
You know what they say, an ounce of prevention...

Your vet will know that any large chested breed is predisposed to bloat.
Bloat is very dangerous and spotting it in time is critical to the dog's survival.
Why not just prevent it with the tacking, especially with a spay, since you're in the area anyway. :)
 

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Simply put "big picture" by bigpoodleperson also adding it reduces the swelling, sutures and recovery time. It's not much different than the more advanced (or at least up to date) procedures that physicians use on people - example back and spine surgery's instead of large incisions; many female procedures as well. Another benefit with dogs is if an older dog or young adult has this procedure it is not as hard on them. Honestly it was not that much more to have my dogs done.:) Hope this helps.

For the prophylactic surgery it is very common - I have not had this done but am also considering that as well.

Unfortunately, surgical lasers are SO expensive.
I wish we could afford one at our clinic, but our doc went with the digital x-ray unit and a therapy laser instead.

Our old, manual x-ray unit sounded like a dying hyena on crack every time we used it.
 

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So how about boys :eek:hwell: ??? Would it be better to do prophylactic surgery for bloat during neutering even though there is no abdominal cutting involved ?

Is tacking 100 % prevention or it just lowers the chance ???

Does anybody know what is a cost of that preventative surgery ?:rolffleyes:
 

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Honestly, I would do a male during neuter as well.
I even thought about having my boss do it when/if Flip ever needs his teeth cleaned.

My doc only charges 25 dollars more on top of whatever surgery he was doing, but he is more reasonable than other vets.
 

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Here is a helpful link about bloat:
http://www.greenoaksarkansasvets.com/medical/caninebloat.html

I'll repaste the breed list here:
Although any dog can be affected by bloat, it most often occurs in deep-chested, large and giant breeds between the ages of 4 and 10 years old.

* Great Dane
* German Shepherd
* Standard Poodle
* Rottweiler
* Akita
* Bloodhound
* Irish Setter
* Golden Retriever
* Irish Wolfhound
* Labrador
* Newfoundland


The following small/mid-sized breeds may also be prone to bloat:

* Dachshund
* Basset Hound
* Airedale Terrier
 

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The stomach tacking wont prevent your dog from bloating. It will prevent the deadly torsion (stomach twisting) which is where the problem is. Your dog can still get lots of air in his stomach, and will act very uncomfortable.
 
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