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Is it common for poodles to not be able to be trusted off leash? My golden retriever and German shepherd have been off leash pretty much since the day they came home as puppies with no problems, or even any close calls. Just wondering if this is something I should write down in my “poodle traits” list for when I eventually get one. Note to self: DO NOT let puppy off leash outside. ;)
Annie was VERY reliable offleash before she turned 6 months. Not particularly reliable from 8 to 14 months, she is slowly becoming more reliable again at 18 months. She has a high prey drive, and other dogs/people are more rewarding to her than any treat or ball. I have been working on her ball drive and focus on me with distractions, and her recall is getting far better. I unfortunately didnt have much opportunity for safe offleash practice when she was younger (I dont have a yard) but she is pretty reliable offleash now in a field or on an unpopulated hiking trail or at my dads acreage, or on a quiet country road. I wouldnt walk her offleash in the city or where I expect to see other dogs/people. So- if you work with a poodle from puppyhood, and anticipate teenaged hijinks, probably fine?

Fenris- wow, Sisko has made a lot of progress! Is that demand-sitting instead of demand barking I see :D ?!
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I think Peggy learned a lot of her energy-burning behaviours from the dogs she plays with. Plus, she's always had a yard to run in. Maybe Sisko just needs some practise. :)
A large chunk of dogs’ brains are dedicated to olfaction so this makes sense to me. Groot is the same. Once he’s done sniffing everything (anywhere from 10-45 min depending on where we are), he’s ready to play some fetch or chase with Snoop.
That totally makes sense. If it's a new place, or a place frequented by other dogs, that very important sniff could take a while!
Yeah, that's right! It's very important that they sniff around! The thing is, I'm not used to that, because Dax was always so focused on us and didn't REALLY care about sniffing all about like how Sisko does even when we took her to new places.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Annie was VERY reliable offleash before she turned 6 months. Not particularly reliable from 8 to 14 months, she is slowly becoming more reliable again at 18 months. She has a high prey drive, and other dogs/people are more rewarding to her than any treat or ball. I have been working on her ball drive and focus on me with distractions, and her recall is getting far better. I unfortunately didnt have much opportunity for safe offleash practice when she was younger (I dont have a yard) but she is pretty reliable offleash now in a field or on an unpopulated hiking trail or at my dads acreage, or on a quiet country road. I wouldnt walk her offleash in the city or where I expect to see other dogs/people. So- if you work with a poodle from puppyhood, and anticipate teenaged hijinks, probably fine?

Fenris- wow, Sisko has made a lot of progress! Is that demand-sitting instead of demand barking I see :D ?!
Thank you!😁 He really has! It is😀
 

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Is it common for poodles to not be able to be trusted off leash? My golden retriever and German shepherd have been off leash pretty much since the day they came home as puppies with no problems, or even any close calls. Just wondering if this is something I should write down in my “poodle traits” list for when I eventually get one. Note to self: DO NOT let puppy off leash outside. ;)
My Spoo is seldom on a leash, only if walking in town where it is required. Start training a great recall from the first minute, and have being by you be the most wonderful place to be. I am 74 and there is no way I would ever be able to give him enough exercise if he couldn't race through the woods.

We didn't have a fenced yard as the city didn't allow one tall enough he couldn't jump over for fun, and I was told my dog might be stolen if I left him outside alone! So I bought 2 30' horse lunge lines, or dog training leads. If I wanted one longer than 30' I tied them together, so 60' Then I would fasten it to a spiral tie-out stake. That gives you a 60' radius circle, or 120' diameter. It was great for practicing recalls or teaching fetch in an open field. I also used the 30' one when camping looped around a tree, etc. When I was traveling and we would be near a road, or if there were a lot of squirrels around, they were wonderful. I haven't needed to use them for years though.
 
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