Poodle Forum banner

21 - 40 of 41 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,147 Posts
That GSD is scaling the fence, not clear jumping it. It is quite a feat, but I bet it took a lot of training and clearly wasn't a spontaneous leap decided on by the dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,169 Posts
Well yes...he is scaling it. But sailing or scaling, he and lots of dogs I think can get over a tall fence and escape if they have a mind and body to. lol. The op's dog probably scaled the fence too most likely.

Here's something about coyotes. They scale, leap, climb very high fences. Kind of cool to watch.

https://www.ocregister.com/2017/06/07/how-high-a-fence-can-coyotes-jump/

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
The trouble with Guiness records is that only a fraction of statistics are gathered. Not everyone reports their dogs' jumps most likely. I have no doubt there are dogs that can jump a 6 ft. fence or higher. I knew of a dog in Idaho that jumped out of his fenced yard. I think it was a 6' fence. The dog that bit me jumped the 5ft fence in his yard and that was not a large dog at all...maybe the height of my knees or a tad taller. One of our GSDs jumped over our 4.5 ft fence we had in the front yard. That wasn't that tall I guess.(I scolded him harshly and he never did again. That was many years ago) Coyotes, I know for a fact can jump a 6 foot fence or higher.

Check out this GSD



Wow. That was one difficult Rottweiler. Terrible about the chickens. Glad he liked little dogs. My Dobe liked little dogs too, grew up with them. But he didn't want to go far from my side. True velcro. lol.
yes he was quite difficult but was the sweetest dog ever and super trained just could not get him out of jumping fences when no one was around. The chickens we felt awful about he wasn’t even trying to kill them they kept running from him understandably and when he would finally catch them he would bite down a little too hard. But me and my mom were able to find a family selling chickens and we replaced the chickens our dog killed. So in the end everyone was happy. We trained him up and later rehomed him as a service dog to a young couple. It was the best decision I ever made he goes everywhere with his handler so no more need to escape.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,386 Posts
The trouble with Guinness records is that only a fraction of statistics are gathered...

Jesse Owens was the first black solo track runner to win in the Olympics in Germany in 1936, attended by Hitler. (The first to run in the Olympics was John Taylor, who ran with a team in 1906.)

An excerpt about Jesse Owens: "He specialized in the sprints and the long jump, and was recognized in his lifetime as "perhaps the greatest and most famous athlete in track and field history". He set three world records and tied another, all in less than an hour at the 1935 Big Ten track meet in Ann Arbor, Michigan—a feat that has never been equaled and has been called "the greatest 45 minutes ever in sport".

"He achieved international fame at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany by winning four gold medals: 100 meters, 200 meters, long jump, and 4 × 100 meter relay. He was the most successful athlete at the Games..." Wikepedia
.

Amusing forgotten quote: When I was coming of age in the late '70s in DC, however, it was fairly common knowledge in the black community that Jesse said, "Growing up, I could never outrun my brother." :)

His brother didn't continue with track, so of course, never made Guinness World Records.

My point is there are always exceptional individuals in humans as well as the animal kingdom, including poodles like this one, and in the video below of a piano-playing chicken, so I keep an open mind about Loni's experience with her poodle leaping over the 7ft fence where she showed a photo of it.

Invisible Electric Fence? Years ago my brother dug a trench around an area of the backyard and then installed one for Pugs so they wouldn't wander into the woods. They had to wear an electric or radio thingy attached to their collar, and it worked.

However, I don't know how this would play out with a flying poodle. :)

Here's the chicken playing a piano:


Btw, Loni, if trained, your dog would rock in Agility!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,169 Posts
Amazing Vita! They probably shaped that behavior with a clicker. Birds aren't dumb, that's for sure. I trained some pigeons in animal behavior class and it was a trip how clever they can be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
LONI'S I seem to have offended you at some level. I apologize.



As to fence jumping I just don't recall much discussion on that as an issue. I don't worry about fence jumping since our dogs have all been taught to respect gates and other sorts of barriers. Even though the poodles could certainly jump the gates they are familiar with they just don't do that, but training to respect fences does sound like something you need to work on.
Thank you for you apology. Yes, now that this issue has presented itself, we will be honing in on it.

I was somewhat offended. There I was asking advice on what could be applied to a fence. You respond: "I don't think she jumped it. She probably scaled it. I don't know why you bother with daycare. It's unnecessary."

No mention of my question. No mention of how I could make a fence more secure (you've yet to make mention of it even still).

Not helpful at all with a hint of judgement at the end.

It's fine if you don't believe how she got over it -- skepticism is a great thing -- but if it were me and my only purpose for commenting in a benign thread was to debunk at risk of ignoring the question, I would have skipped the thread all together.

Maybe that's not the practice here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
Jesse Owens was the first black solo track runner to win in the Olympics in Germany in 1936, attended by Hitler. (The first to run in the Olympics was John Taylor, who ran with a team in 1906.)

An excerpt about Jesse Owens: "He specialized in the sprints and the long jump, and was recognized in his lifetime as "perhaps the greatest and most famous athlete in track and field history". He set three world records and tied another, all in less than an hour at the 1935 Big Ten track meet in Ann Arbor, Michigan—a feat that has never been equaled and has been called "the greatest 45 minutes ever in sport".

"He achieved international fame at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany by winning four gold medals: 100 meters, 200 meters, long jump, and 4 × 100 meter relay. He was the most successful athlete at the Games..." Wikepedia
.

Amusing forgotten quote: When I was coming of age in the late '70s in DC, however, it was fairly common knowledge in the black community that Jesse said, "Growing up, I could never outrun my brother." :)

His brother didn't continue with track, so of course, never made Guinness World Records.

My point is there are always exceptional individuals in humans as well as the animal kingdom, including poodles like this one, and in the video below of a piano-playing chicken, so I keep an open mind about Loni's experience with her poodle leaping over the 7ft fence where she showed a photo of it.

Invisible Electric Fence? Years ago my brother dug a trench around an area of the backyard and then installed one for Pugs so they wouldn't wander into the woods. They had to wear an electric or radio thingy attached to their collar, and it worked.

However, I don't know how this would play out with a flying poodle. :)

Here's the chicken playing a piano:


Btw, Loni, if trained, your dog would rock in Agility!
Thank you. I've been hearing that she would do well in agility a lot lately. That is something I've always intended on doing, but she had pretty severe food sensitivities (yay sick every meal) and lost quite a bit of weight. Blood work was always perfect, but the weight loss reduced her energy levels. Generally not the best time to start besides a few intro classes.

Now that we've figured it out and she's putting on great weight and muscle... my bouncy, spinning top of a puppy is back. She's jumping further and higher, taking more risks, leaping, spinning and hopping, and building her confidence.

Next year, it is definitely on the list.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
Loni's,

I've had more than my fair share of escape artists of different varieties. I'm not going to get into what's possible. I've seen dogs do things that I would have never thought possible. I will say if she's a high flyer then you won't ever be able to truly trust her to stay behind a fence. You can train until your legs fall off however if something motivates her more on the other side... alleee-ooop! You must be super careful about putting a wire up top due to safety reasons. If she's managing to jump or spring board off of something to go that high (I speak from experience as I've had a dog who used other dogs OR ME to springboard off of). Hooking a foot in the wire could be a mess for her. So you could put the dealies up there that lean in but make certain you put something solid threated through there so she can see there's a lid on the box (so to speak). Often times this will do the trick.

If she's doing any scaling, climbing then you can simply put something slick at the level of where she tries to hook in & she will sliiiiiiide & it'll stop her from it once she is corrected by sliding each time. A climber works best with electric fence. Because they're not moving with tremendous momentum like they do when they jump or springboard.

If I got to have my dream fence it would be solid block wall on a poured concrete footing, perhaps 4-5 feet tall with some sort of decorative rail on top. This prevents my dogs from sounding off on my neighbors' business but it also prevents my neighbors from teasing/harassing my dogs... which sadly has happened. The worst of these is the person who thinks they are a master in training dogs & their behavior when in fact... ugh... just no. This dream fence of mine is among the safest but it's quite pricey
Wow major jump..I only have a 4 ft no dig garden fence across my backyard. The rest is a stockade 6 ft fence. I am lucky the none of my dogs has scaled a fence but then again they are never outside unsupervised so that could be reason. We have covenants and I can only put a 4 ft picket fence along my backyard. The rest 6 ft is allowable. I have no clue what would work. I have used doggy daycare in the past for my terrier, it was good until she kept getting kennel cough. They were strict about shots but apparently a new strain came in that year and we stopped going. It was a nice time for her. I kinda wish I did it with my poodle I think he would be better socialized from it. I think its a nice break for them occasionally as opposed to sitting home alone all day everyday. But we all do what works for ourselves, dogs are creatures of habit.
Loni's, I could understand your concern for sure!! I think I would get a tall fence that is wood (cant see through) and do the "No mans land" like "rose n Poos" suggested!!! If my Norman was a jumper, I would do anything to make him safe. I know Lowes or Home Depot have lots of fencing options that are (to me) aesthetically pleasing.

For the daycare, I wish I could send Norman to one every once in a while! There is a great one here in town but it has a very very long waiting list. They are so great that they are building another facility!! I think if your dog enjoys going, send them! Some dogs thrive in large pack sizes! Some people do not believe in daycare, and that is understandable! :) Everyone's lifestyle, like you said, is different! Daycare would be perfect for ours but since it is booked, we make it work without!! (lots of puzzle games LOL!) If your pupper likes daycare, send her! Making our dogs happy should be our top priority, if not why do we have them??

Maybe ask if you can get a video of the jump? (If they have cameras) This could help you see if she might have used anything for leverage or if shes just that good!!! Also if they do not have cameras and if they happen to separate her again to let her rest, ask them to record on their phones and see what happens! They may have a faulty fence system going on and need to rethink it !! :)

Good luck!!!
Just remember any time you think something's impossible... that's what everyone said before they saw it the first time.

A friend reminded me that you can also put something along the top of the fence that moves. Scary eye balloons come to mind due to the fact that they're used to spook off birds of prey but that might look pretty silly, as if you've a fear of hawks or owls. but if you got something that you could thread above the top of the fence through those lean overs & give it enough room that it could wave in the wind, it might be just enough to deter her because it's always moving in a different manner. I know a few folks that this has worked with their dogs. One used a metallic 4 inch stuff that wasn't really plastic but reminded me of plastic. Another used the stuff you put up for sun screen. They cut it in long strips & hung it at the top & at the bottom of that lean in thingy. For the dog they look at this & it changes their perception of if it's safe to go over.

Another very crafty elderly woman with a Siberian Huskey who could jump, climb, & scale like it had cleats on its feet, went to Hobby Lobby & got these beautiful tassels. Then she got really pretty clear or frosted Christmas lights & she stretched & twisted them around the base of the dealy for the top of the fence (I'm talking about the 3 wire lean in thing). So she had a fence that she explained to the home owners association that she turned the lights on at night not only for safety purposes of her dog but also they provided a nightlight so she could see in her yard. (She had had an intruder hiding in her back yard once who was a prison escapee). So her concerns were valid. The dangly tassels were dark & quite pretty even if they were unusual. The HOA approved the irregularities on the fence & the Huskey remained inside her fence from that point forward.
I can't seem to figure out how Multi-Quotes work on this website. I've quoted most of you all, but they won't show up. Thank you so much for your suggestions (and that warning about wire).

There are some trees and wild grape that need to cleared before we move forward with our fence plans. I have some time to do more research and come up with a strategy. By then, she'll be much more trained on how to properly respond to fences. This could very well be a one off given she's never reacted to fences this way before despite having ample opportunity, but I want to be safe and nip this in the bud.

PS: I posted it and the quotes showed up. Marvelous!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,885 Posts
Well, whatever method she used, 7 ft pretty darn impressive- she’s a little wild child- lol!

The first day I brought Lily home (a poodle mix, and my wild child), she jumped from the floor straight up to the back of the couch. It was a high back couch, probably at least 3-4 times her height at the withers. I’m not sure what that works out to be proportionately for your girl and a 7 ft. Fence, but I think it’s a similar kind of thing...like “OMG, I can’t believe she just did that!”

I had a lot of moments like that with Lily, though scaling fences was not one of them. She never tried to get out of the fence, even if the gate was open, if I call her, she’d stay right with me. She’s ten now and with a new poodle puppy in the house and I am remembering many of her young, crazy antics, but Gracie puppy is doing her best to keep the memories near and dear!

The new puppy, Gracie, is high energy and crazy, but in a different way. She’s not as unpredictable as Lily was.

Whatever she does, enjoy her and do your best to keep her safe. The young years go so fast, I still can’t believe my Lily girl is ten years old. A healthy ten thank God, and has occasional zoomies in agility still(running around the course haphazardly like a mad dog)!

Let us know how it goes, somehow I think your girl will continue to provide many entertaining moments for you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,169 Posts
https://coloradocoyoterollers.com/


I'm not sure if the coyote rollers are 100% reliable. I'd look into that and find out if there are ever any failures or problems with them. But they, at first look, appear to be a very possible solution.


Another idea is to rig up something, maybe with those attractive lattice panels they sell at Home Depot and make a frame so that the two foot high (or so) panels attach to the top of your fence and angle inward at about 45 degrees. I think something hovering over their heads would make it difficult to jump, if not impossible. Not sure. Can't find anything so far online but you might be able to if you spend more time than I have. Of course, you'd have to make sure it's okay with your HOA if you have one or the city regs. I see things made of wire but that might be dangerous if a dog would catch his foot in it. And not very attractive either. Here's something: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/730146158307172072/?lp=true


I'm on a roll. Lookie here: http://www.waysidewaifs.org/site/DocServer/FENCE_CLIMBERS_FENCE_JUMPERS__DIGGERS15.pdf?docID=3485
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,169 Posts
That GSD is scaling the fence, not clear jumping it. It is quite a feat, but I bet it took a lot of training and clearly wasn't a spontaneous leap decided on by the dog.
Yes, that dog was trained. But I know of dogs that weren't trained and they were able to get out of their fenced yards via over the fence. I chose a poor example with that picture. I do think that there are dogs, not unlike coyotes that can make it over a tall fence, albeit very rarely. That's likely why most municipalities use 6 ft. as the maximum height for a fence. Most dogs don't get over that height. Probably coyotes are better at it. They do have exceedingly long legs. And survival pressure is on them still very strongly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,125 Posts
Once upon a time at Cantope Kennels *7' chain link fences everywhere* I watched a dog that was in for a grooming, 'bounce' in the run that it was in.

A medium sized Poodle... jumping/bouncing... over and over.

It's head reached the top of the fence every time.

I've not seen anything like it before or since.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Try an underground fence or use an invisible fence with your fence they sell them at Petsmart just place it along your fence and if she gets to close to the fence the collars are set to your preference so it can do a sound, vibrate, or give a small shock and eventually the dog should learn its boundaries. My mom uses the invisible fence with her fence to keep in her GP mix that breed is notorious for escaping and roaming
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
Try an underground fence or use an invisible fence with your fence they sell them at Petsmart just place it along your fence and if she gets to close to the fence the collars are set to your preference so it can do a sound, vibrate, or give a small shock and eventually the dog should learn its boundaries. My mom uses the invisible fence with her fence to keep in her GP mix that breed is notorious for escaping and roaming
I agree here. I would maybe look into an invisible fence, but some people are against them which I understand, but for me it comes down to Norman safety. I use it because we dont have a fence (and are not allowed to have one) and live on a mountain where my Norman is distracted by all sorts of wild life LOL! Miles and miles for him to run off into! Only once did Norman run after a deer into the woods (came right back though) and that terrified me enough to get this fence for his safety the SAME DAY. We have teenagers speeding on the roads, construction workers making loud sounds, bob-cats, and other things that could hurt/kill him if he ran off, got spooked, or too curious!
Since I got this fence he will NEVER cross the boundaries at all (on level 3 of 10!) It trained him right up, one 1 day. Now I seldom put on the collar (pending on what we are doing outside) because he is very cautious to go a certain distance from the house knowing its a "no no" zone.

But you have a fence, so I think using it for a couple weeks really could work! It will tell your dog that the yard is good, but coming up to the fence (within 3-5 feet) is a "no-no"! The underground wires can really pinpoint where you want the barrier to be. The invisible fence may be a bit more tough to shape to your fence since it is a circle around your house, not a square. Its low cost compared to getting a whole new fencing system put in. But its all perspective in what is right for you and your lifestyle!

This collar has been a true peace of mind for me. Please let us know what you decide!! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,361 Posts
Where I live by code I was unable to put in more than a 3' fence. Hilarious as he could jump one from a standstill, and it would cost $1,800 for a small area. Then I looked at the underground electric fences, however it would have cost over $2,000 for the same area. And, in my mind it would not have kept out other aggressive dogs, or coyotes or wolves (yes we have them up here in the UP).

So I gave up on the idea of containment, and taught him to want to be with me, to be able to go explore a safe distance and then come back. I do not leave him outside unattended (as a highly trained Standard Poodle Service Dog he would be way too attractive to simply take). So many people have expressed a desire for him! (While walking in Washington DC one man actually tried to grab him from me and take off.)

So in my yard I throw balls and play games and he stays here. He joyously greets guests, only makes two barks when it is a new person on the porch. I take him to the woods near here every day to crazily run loose, always within sight, and then we go home. I guess you would say he is never unsupervised.

At first I was so upset about the city regulations, but now I realize it encouraged me to train him better ( and saved a bunch of money on fences, both visible and invisible! ).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,386 Posts
... So many people have expressed a desire for him! (While walking in Washington DC one man actually tried to grab him from me and take off.)...
Kontiki, thank goodness you and your dog are okay!

I live in DC, and there have been at least a half dozen dog kidnappings in the city in the past two years. The media and police are extremely aggressive and often successful in getting these dogs back. They're usually poodles or pitbull puppies, which sell easily. The dog 'nappers have typically been addicts wanting a quick buck and sell them to an unsuspecting neighbor or friend, although one creepy mother and her teenage daughter assaulted a woman walking her four dogs so they could have the one that's a poodle. The cops got it back!

My breeder, who lives in nearby Maryland in a quiet, nice, low crime neighborhood, has a neighbor whose small dog was robbed at gunpoint last year. For these reasons (and fears of encountering an aggressive dog on a walk) is why I take them to very specific areas.

Do you remember the cross streets or approximate location where this happened? I want to know so I can check off that area.

And how did you get the man away from your dog? Did he look a street person, or was he the type you'd never suspect to try to grab your dog and run? And how did your dog react when all of this was happening? Did it bark a lot, pull away? Try to bite the guy?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,871 Posts
Now that is interesting..instead of trying to stop the behavior and getting yourself all frustrated you give them their area. I kinda like the idea. I am fortunate i do not have any diggers, likely because they have never been left unsupervised outdoors so they didn't learn the behavior.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,125 Posts
A little tip about dogs chasing Deer. Deer will not run in a straight line away from the dog. They won't leave their area. They'll run in a large circle back to where they came from.

Your dog's gone after a Deer?? Sit down and wait. The Deer will lead it back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
I have successfully used rover.com for boarding several times, in different parts of the country (we are fulltime RVers). The plus is that your dog is in a home environment, with more attention and eyeballs on it. You have to do your due diligence, for sure, but if you find a good person, it's really a wonderful option. Karma has enjoyed getting to know new houses and their dogs & people, and does fine. The person also sends pics and videos so you can see how things are going.
 
21 - 40 of 41 Posts
Top