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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We don't get much snow where we live, so when it snows, it is an exciting event!

One problem though, are those "snow balls" that get stuck in poodle feet and legs after a romp in the snow. I have tried wiping with a towel, and that doesn't work well at all, so I have already carried 40lb Betty to the bathtub twice today to rinse her legs off. It is a pain!

For those of you that live in snowy climates, how do you deal with the poodle snow-ball legs?
 

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I know some folks use boots and/or snow suits to protect the coat. We haven't used or needed either yet, though Oona is still a puppy. Her puppy coat does attract snow balls if there is enough snow of the right consistency. She hasn't been bothered by the snowball legs and her feet have been trimmed enough that she hasn't gotten snowball-y toes which really drove my old bearded collie crazy (so he did need his boots). We've resorted to putting her in a crate to thaw out for 10 mins or so, with with a towel down and a stuffed kong to keep her busy.
 

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Because snow is cold you wouldn’t think this would be helpful but clean shaved poodle feet really do help. The more hair there is between the toes the more the snow will stick and ball up and the harder it is to get out. Boots definitely work but sometimes you don’t want to put the boots on every time poodle needs to go outside, at least I don’t. 😉 I usually put Bobby’s boots on him when it’s really cold, icy or for extended time outdoors. Putting some Musher’s Secret between the toe pads helps a lot too, especially on clean feet. It does make the toes slippery though so I try not to use too much. It helps the snow not stick so much. As for the legs, I just towel them off several times. We keep Bobby fairly short so it‘s not a huge issue on his legs, for us anyways. There are definitely various sorts of leggings you can purchase to protect the legs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you Oonapup and Spottytoes! OK, I can see why it would be a good thing to get boots and/or leg coverings. But I am reluctant to buy them since snow is relatively rare here. Betty's feet are shaved, so its mainly her leg hair that is the issue. So it looks like my choices (outside of the bathtub routine) are letting the snow thaw for a few minutes, then toweling, or, get more aggressive with the toweling :).
 

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My family uses boots when it is really cold, icy, or after a fresh snow. We also keep them shaved pretty short (0.5 in/ 25 mm). Additionally, when the snowballs do pile up, I have found a brush breaks the snowballs up pretty well and we can towel them off better. Whatever we don't get, the dogs will lick off themselves.
 

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Fill a plastic container with warm water and put each paw in it for a minute or two to melt the snow balls. Restaurant take away soup containers work well for this because they are tall and narrow. Have a warm towel handy to dry the foot and a wide tooth comb to comb out any small snow ball out of the hair. Don’t try to comb out large snow balls because that’s painful.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you all- I am liking the idea of the container of water and paw-dipping. I'll set that up in the laundry room before the next outing.

Fluffy Poodle - I am not sure about trying to brush them out. Her leg hair is about an inch long, and the snowballs get really stuck in there tightly. I think if her hair was shorter I would try that though!

I appreciate everyone's suggestions. I am a snow newbie.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
f I let the dog in, I try to have him place on an absorbent microfiber mat, then towel and comb.
If my kids let him in.... Let's just say thank goodness for vinyl flooring and I pull out the mop!
Haha! Yes, I feel like I have been spending a lot of time wiping up water from the floor!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Reraven- The lazy person in me says "that sounds like lot of work, and icy cold fingers would be involved. lol!
 

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We're in Nova Scotia and we get a fair amount of snow over the winter. Austen loves it!

A friend of ours who has a doodle gave us this tip - we run a plastic whisk down our pup's legs and tummy to gently remove snowballs before we towel him off. It works surprisingly well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Austen - a whisk like is used in the kitchen? How intriguing! I only have the metal kind but I would love to try it!
 

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I use a slicker brush and brush the snow off. I’m trying to find leggings for them, that would be the best.
 

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Yes, exactly! We have a metal one but also happened to have one with plastic or silicone tines that came in a set with other kitchen utensils.

Your Betty is very cute!

Austen - a whisk like is used in the kitchen? How intriguing! I only have the metal kind but I would love to try it!
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I slather Vaseline on paws before heading into the snow and it drastically increases the amount of time before anything sticks in between their toes. They sell dedicated balms for that, but they’re usually in a base of petrolatum anyways!
 

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I had tried a few things to keep the snowballs off, boots didn’t work because they would fall off, the balm was great for the bottoms of her feet but not for the rest of her. I tried the water method but that just made her a muddy mess. So I ultimately bought a cheaper pair of leggings (walkeepaws) and a more expensive pair of backcountry paw’s gaiters.

I used to use walkeepaws which worked okay for walks outside on the streets/sidewalks. I didn’t like them for the dog park, backyard or if there was a lot of snow because they didn’t cover her full legs, weren’t 100% waterproof and would fall off if she was running.

I loved the gaiters from backcountry paws which were great. They were 100% waterproof, didn’t impact her range of motion and didn’t come off. She would zip around the mountain trail when we snowshoeing and would get back to the car and be 100% dry and I felt they were worth the money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
GoldieMom - a hairdryer is a great idea too! For me though, it seems that a quick dunk in a container of water is going to work better (faster?). I have a perfect area to do this on the tiled laundry room floor.

Vanessa - since her feet are shaved we havent had a real problem with snow stuck in her feet (thank goodness!)

Dechi - a slicker brush makes sense too!

I love all of your feedback and help in teaching me about this new thing in my life! :).

Yesterday, Betty got at least two hours of ball fetch time (in a couple sessions). She loves it!! It was hard to get her to come inside. Here's a photo of a happy poodle
 

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