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We brought home Hagrid at the beginning of October when he was about 10 weeks old and he settled in fairly well! I started basic training with him basically the day after we got him and so far he’s been the star of his puppy classes since we started 4 weeks ago!!

About 2 weeks into having him he started sleeping through the night (or at least keeping himself occupied silently) from about 9-10pm till 6am but in the last week that’s all gone out the window!

Hagrid will wake up barking between a number of times between 2am-4am and won’t settle down. He has an exercise pen and his crate set up in kitchen (we’re still working on him with the crate as he’s still not a fan). We live in an apartment community so we can’t easily ignore him when he’s barking out of fear of annoying the neighbours but he just won’t settle. I take him out and he just wants to play so we come back inside and then I can’t leave him alone or he starts barking again.
I’ve had to lay on the couch next to his pen every morning and just him out till he goes to sleep again but if I leave the room he starts barking and going nuts.

I know he’s also in full teething mode (lost another baby tooth yesterday and has a few adult teeth poking through! He’s been eating lots of ice cubes and chewing everything) but is there anything we can do to help him sleep the night again?
 

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Is there anything specific that happens around then to wake him? Someone coming home late in a neighbouring apartment, central heating firing up, vehicle patrolling? Has the weather been bad, meaning less exercise, especially late in the day? I would try more exercise, including play and brain work in the evening, and perhaps also moving his crate into a room where there are fewer noises - or into your bedroom, where he can be close enough to you to feel reassured and you can sleep rather than camp on the couch.
 

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I agree with fjm that you will probably see better resettling if the crate is in the bed room at least at night). Do some training (brain game stuff) in the evening to make him tired and hopefully he will sleep through.


Don't add to his excited state if he does wake up. Keep lights off, don't engage in play. If you think it is needed take him out for potty with no talk or play and then put him right back in the crate.
 

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Maybe lots of ice cubes added to the amount of water he is taking in? Teething is really awful and so painful. If you can rule out that there is nothing physical (Coming from having had UTIs all my life - so very painful) and knowing that dogs get those too - especially in winter - I would definitely mention this at the next vet visit and do a kidney panel - which is not expensive at all. And I agree night pee-pee outings are boring, stern, on leash short opportunities and definitely not fun and games! Having him with you in your room might chill him out - but you may have to build in one night time outing for now - it will go away once the teething is over.
 

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Is there anything specific that happens around then to wake him? Someone coming home late in a neighbouring apartment, central heating firing up, vehicle patrolling? Has the weather been bad, meaning less exercise, especially late in the day? I would try more exercise, including play and brain work in the evening, and perhaps also moving his crate into a room where there are fewer noises - or into your bedroom, where he can be close enough to you to feel reassured and you can sleep rather than camp on the couch.
Our building is relatively quiet, there are imposed quiet hours from 10pm-9am so people are quite respectful of that. I heard this morning some loud motorcycles and cars driving by so maybe that’s setting him off?

I normally don’t engage when he barks I come into the room with the lights off and just check to make sure he’s okay and get a glass of water for myself so he doesn’t think I’m coming out for him but as soon as he sees me leave the room he starts barking again - I think he’s figured out that he’s not allowed to bark and we’ll have to come out and be around when he does ?.

We take him out for a walk in the evening followed by a few hours of on an off play and training every night to tire him out and he’s clearly exhausted. He’ll pass out on the floor and refuse to go into his bed he’s so tired normally... I’m just worried somethings upset his schedule and DH thinks it’s the teething
 

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Because of your situation (appartment complex) the best solution is to bring him in your room.

Inadvertently, you’ve taught him to bark and you come. You probably just went to get some water one day, he made a fuss, you talked to him and he made the connection.

The way to correct this is to undo what has been done and let him bark. If he’s been doing it for 2 weeks, it might take another 7-10 days before he stops, and that’s if you don’t make one single mistake. Everytime you make one, the counter resets to zero and it’s 7-10 days of barking again.

Since it’s not a suitable solution for you, bring the crate in your room. Pay no attention to him once he’s in his crate, except maybe reaching your hand to let him know you’re there, when he’s not fussing or barking. If he has to go pee, don’t turn on the lights, don’t talk to him, don’t pet him. Just tell him the command words to go pee, let him do it and bring him back right in his crate. If he hasn’t gone after 5 minutes, he goes back.

The other solution is to ask a very nice friend with a house if he can break the habit for you amd then you can have him back in 2-3 weeks. If you do that, you’ll have to be very careful not to create the same scenario when he comes back to you. Maybe change the room his crate is in so he doesn’t get back into his old habits.

Also, make sure he doesn’t have food 2-3 hours before going to bed and very little water. I wouldn’t get him exhausted right before sleep. I would do the exhausting part of the day, and the training, before dinner. Evenings would be for calm play without excitement and watching tv, so he is in a calm state of mind before going to bed. You don’t want to have a pup who needs to be drained every night in order to sleep the night. He needs to learn to find ways to settle down by himself. Routine will set slowly and he will adjust to it.

Good luck !
 

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Aversives?

Hi I guess everybody's against negative punishment? Sorry to say, I have resorted to the bark collar for my Standard Boy. He has a bad habit of running to the edge of our property and barking his head off at passersby and neighbors going about their business.

Bark collar is a godsend. He now runs at the deer and squirrels and watching people, but never barks. (Until the batteries run down and he gradually realizes he can again.) . Seems like you could put it on before bed and let it shock him if he barks in the night. He won't keep barking after one or two shocks and that's the end of it.

I know many think these things are cruel - some consider invisible fence (which we also have) cruel. Just my 2cents...
 

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I think a shock collar would be extremely cruel in this case, for this young puppy. He is just lonely being away from his family. Dogs are social and love to sleep with their people. If they can't sleep in bed, always nice for them to sleep in a crate in the bedroom. If they can't be in the bedroom, then they need a buddy to sleep with. Shock collars have no place in this situation, or on a poodle period IMHO.
 

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OP I am glad that moving your pup's crate/bed has fixed your issue.


I do have bark collars for our dogs, but would never have put one on a puppy or adolescent dog without trying other methods first. At this point Lily has figured out she doesn't like the sensation of the vibration from it and doesn't bark when she wears it. The boys may bark once or twice, but for all of them if they aren't wearing them they bark. As to the in ground electric fence if the dog isn't wearing the collar then the fence doesn't do anything. I think a smart dog will figure that out too. I generally prefer methods where a person trains a dog rather than letting a device train the dog and when I do rely on devices I make sure I have a way to be able to fade its use built in.
 

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I'm so glad you sorted it so easily and so happily!
 
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