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Discussion Starter #1
We have a 3 year old Standard, a picky eater and she’s had digestive issues her entire life. We tried a
variety of foods (mostly kibbles, including Orijen), we even cooked for her, but we never saw much of
an improvement. For the past year she was on a Vet prescribed hydrolyzed (Hills) kibble.
Then, less than a month ago it all changed when a Vet got her onto RAW, and it’s given our pooch a
new lease on life, finally!
Now, there’s no more refusing to eat, no more vomiting/dry heaving, no more runny poops, and the
scratching’s gone too. Zero issues!. It totally blows me away, I’m so happy for her!
The Vet pretty much predicted this outcome. He said RAW is the natural food for dogs.
He didn’t have anything good to say about kibbles.
He mentioned too, that her new diet would result in smaller and firmer poops... check!

We joined a local co-op and got 2 samples of Titan, raw frozen dog food. It comes either finely or
coarsely ground and packed into 5 pound logs. We chose the fine.
We thaw it out enough to scoop it into a bowl. I thought our picky eater would give it a sniff and walk
away. I was sure of it, after all, it’s raw and cold!. She DEVOURS it!, licking the bowl clean, every time.

I hope someone will benefit from reading this. I don’t imagine there’s many RAW Vets out there.

Steve
 

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I’m very surprised a vet would have nothing good to say about kibble. Not all kibbles are bad, far from it, some have a very fine quality. Like everything is life, nothing is ever all black or all white.

Feeding raw did not help my dog but hydrolyzed vet food is promising. Every dog is different and needs a different solution.

I’m happy raw is working for you.
 

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Raw didn't help my pup either, neither did home cooking. Dechi I agree each dog is different, prescription diet didn't, I did find one kibble that agrees with my girl.
 

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This is such fantastic news. I'm so happy you shared with us. Some dogs go their whole lives without ever feeling truly well. It can be such an emotionally exhausting process for their owners. And expensive, too!

Does your vet take a holistic approach?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What's the cost per pound?
Roughly between 1-2 dollars a pound, depending on the recipe, and whether it’s packaged in tubes or in bulk.
We’re going to first try their ‘Blue’ recipe in bulk, at $1.14 /lb.
That’s a fraction of what we paid for the Hills hydrolyzed kibble.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This is such fantastic news. I'm so happy you shared with us. Some dogs go their whole lives without ever feeling truly well. It can be such an emotionally exhausting process for their owners. And expensive, too!

Does your vet take a holistic approach?
You’re spot on there PeggyTheParti, I felt badly for the poor dog for so long.
We could tell when she wasn’t feeling well, which was often!
Our vet is big time HOLISTIC, just love this guy!

Thank you for the nice reply!
 

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Olive had a similar problem, she was not eating her kibble and her coat was not shiny. She was only eating Kirkland kibble and that was not a good brant. Now she loves her Primal pet foods, raw diet and is doing very well!
 

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You’re spot on there PeggyTheParti, I felt badly for the poor dog for so long.
We could tell when she wasn’t feeling well, which was often!
Our vet is big time HOLISTIC, just love this guy!

Thank you for the nice reply!
This is the nudge I needed to reach out to our holistic vet. Thank you!! She's quite a trek from here (about an hour, but with a bridge between us that often opens up for marine crossings and leaves us stuck) so she's not convenient. But she'd be a great resource and I'd like her to meet Peggy while she's still so young and healthy.

I think having a veterinary team rather than relying on one specific person can be really helpful—someone for day-to-day concerns (like a ripped toe nail or bee sting), someone for after-hours emergency care, and someone for ongoing wellness support. Depending on where you live, that might not all exist under one roof.
 
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