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Am I nuts to get a 8 month old poodle pup at age 71? I've had dogs all my life--but this is the first time I can actually be at home to work with and train a dog. I wouldn't get a young dog before (we always adopted older dogs) because of family work obligations. Can I do it?
 

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My husband and I got a mini poodle pup in December. We're 75. Before we decided to buy we asked our children if they would take him if we could no longer care for him. Once we knew we had a forever home for him, we brought Normie home and haven't regretted it.

I doubt that I could easily handle an untrained standard, but a mini is the perfect size and weight for us.

I have to ask why he's available at 8 months and if he has any basic training or health issues?

Good luck
 

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My husband and I got a mini poodle pup in December. We're 75. Before we decided to buy we asked our children if they would take him if we could no longer care for him. Once we knew we had a forever home for him, we brought Normie home and haven't regretted it.

I doubt that I could easily handle an untrained standard, but a mini is the perfect size and weight for us.

I have to ask why he's available at 8 months and if he has any basic training or health issues?

Good luck
She has basic training and is crate trained. The breeder shows and says he couldn't decide which of two to keep from the litter, so he kept a M and a F. Now is is willing to let one go--my choice. I'm trying to check the breeder out
 

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What size poodle ? I’ve learned from other members that standard poodles start settling down around 3. They remain active dogs, so it depends on how much energy you have.

If it’s a toy poodle, I say go or it if the pup’s energy is what you need. If not, find a calmer one. Toys are definitely the easiest of all three sizes in term of exercise requirements.

As for minis, they are said to be the most active of the three sizes, so again, it depends on your overall health but it will be more work.
 

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Lots of variables to consider. These are questions anyone should ask themselves.
  • Do you anticipate needing to move in the next 15 years? If so, will the next place you live allow dogs? Will there be a pet size limit?
  • Do you currently have any medical conditions or predispositions that could suddenly flare up and put you out of action?
  • Do you have friends or family who could take care of the dog if you have a crisis? Multiple candidates, because lots of things can change over 15 years. Friends retire out of state, kids move into no-pet condos, the grandkid gets engaged to someone allergic to anything with hair.
 

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What size poodle?

If it's a standard, unless you live on a large fenced property, I'd probably advise against it. But otherwise, assuming you're feeling physically and mentally up for the challenge of training, and you've got folks who have promised to be a second home to your pup in case your short-term or long-term circumstances change, I say go for it. (And, for the record, I think both those caveats apply regardless of one's age.)
 

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Being older myself and having a standard I'd go for it. As long as your healthy and can take it for a daily walk and play a game of fetch in the yard. Its fun to train them too. At first I thought I needed my head examined but my guy is now 2 and he is doing so much better. Just being older should not prohibit you from owning the dog of your choice. I am even thinking of a 2nd one. LOL My neighbor is 84 and 71 and they have two standards. The dogs help keep them healthy.
 

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I hope I didn't offend by advising against a standard. I was just speaking from my experience with my neighbours, parents, and other owners in our classes.

But resilience and physical ability varies at all ages.

You should of course get the dog that is the right fit for you. :)
 

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LOL didn't offend me. I have big girl panties. LOL I as most seniors know what we are capable of, provided we are "dog people". It is important to remind people, all people that their physical capabilities are important and should have a plan as to what would happen if we were taken ill. Even when I was young and had young children I had a plan for the "what if".
 

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Ah--the rational side of this, We've already moved to our forever, one story home; I'm healthy, nothing brewing that I know of. I do have an "if I'm gone plan"
Since that's your situation, I see no reason not to get a puppy if you want a puppy.
 

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My Babykins was a similar situation. She was a puppy held back for conformation and they chose to show her sister. I got her when she was almost a year old. Because she was considered for conformation she was extremely well socialized. She loves people and other dogs and cats.

She had no obedience training so she didn’t know basic commands like sit or lie down. Didn’t take long to teach her. She was completely toilet trained which was a huge plus.

You didn’t mention what size. I specifically chose a minipoo because I wanted a dog I could pick up in any emergency. I might have been able to pick up a small standard but I knew it would be easy with a minipoo. I know that my daughter will take her joyfully if that’s ever needed.

I don’t know why people say minipoos need a lot of exercise. My minipoo I had growing up didn’t. As a thank you to friends and family when my father had a heart attack, they bred her with help from the breeder and all her puppies were couch potatoes needing modest exercise. My current minipoo is very active because we train for dog sports, however on days when I’m lazy she’s happy to spend the day snuggling on the couch.

I would get this puppy if the breeder has done all the health checks on the parents and the parents were carefully choose for diversity in the gene pool.
 
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If you have as much planned for as a human reasonably can, I also say go for it. My husband and I are a bit younger than you, and after we got thru tearing our hair out with the puppy antics - we got littermates, 2 almost 9 week old mini boys - it's been quite the amazing life for us all.

If you feel comfortable naming the breeder, we can offer any experiences with them, if any, or simply use the Search function and see if any PF members have asked about or offered information on the breeder. Proper genetic health testing for variety generally figures highly in any breeder assessment. If they've registered any test results with OFA, you can look up by kennel name, or if you have the sire and dam's name or AKC number (if AKC registered) here:

AKC Lookup

Health Testing Criteria - Parents Are Tested Not Puppies - Additional Testing

Toy Minimum Testing Criteria
prcd Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) DNA testing from an approved laboratory
Eye clearance by the Companion Animal Eye Registry (CAER)
Patellar Luxation OFA evaluation

Miniature Minimum Testing Criteria
prcd Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) DNA testing from an approved laboratory
Eye clearance by the Companion Animal Eye Registry (CAER)
Hip Dysplasia evaluation from an approved agency
Patellar Luxation OFA evaluation

Standard Minimum Testing Criteria
Hip Dysplasia evaluation from an approved agency
Eye clearance by the Companion Animal Eye Registry (CAER)
Health Elective (At least one of the following tests):
OFA Thyroid evaluation from an approved laboratory
OFA SA Evaluation from an approved dermapathologist
Congenital Cardiac Exam
Advanced Cardiac Exam

OFA Lookup
 

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I would absolutely if I were you, it can be a ton of fun for you. Going to obedience classes is something I always enjoyed with our two, and practicing, taking them out to romp where I knew they'd have fun. It's all a lifestyle choice but enormously enjoyable! The one thing I would check first is the dog's personality and if you click. Also, if you do go ahead with it, it is very nice to have an alternative for exercise if you can't take him out one day or don't feel like it. Doggy daycare, dog walkers, dog play date friends you can ask to take your dog and burn off some extra energy are great ideas.

Sent from my VOG-L04 using Tapatalk
 

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I say go for it! You have an owner succession plan in place and time to spend training and enjoying your well-bred mini. A friend of mine is 75, does multi mile jogs with two dogs separately and then plays tennis! Nearly every day. A mini is a manageable size and in these times an adorable distraction and company. Even if you trust the breeder consider pet health insurance, cheap in the early years. I hope you decide to get a puppy:)
 

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Am I nuts to get a 8 month old poodle pup at age 71? I've had dogs all my life--but this is the first time I can actually be at home to work with and train a dog. I wouldn't get a young dog before (we always adopted older dogs) because of family work obligations. Can I do it?
Assuming you are an active, healthy person, you should go for it. I am 79 and would not hesitate to add another dog to our pack.
 

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Am I nuts to get a 8 month old poodle pup at age 71? I've had dogs all my life--but this is the first time I can actually be at home to work with and train a dog. I wouldn't get a young dog before (we always adopted older dogs) because of family work obligations. Can I do it?
Same problem here. I went ahead, and loved her. But my kids know her and will take over in case I cannot care for her. Can you make some souch arrangement. Otherwise, I think my girl loves an at home parent.
 

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I am 82 and recently got a 'big' toy poodle! She was a kennel dog, and is very timid. I don't take her out much, she has indoor washable human grade pee pads to use. She is a ball freak, and demands many chase the ball episodes all day long! I love her. She makes me laugh, get up in the am (it is so easy to turn over and go back to sleep!) Not with her! She also has a 3.5# long coat chihuahua as a pal. They get along, but do not play. The toy weighs almost 9 pounds, and is considered by the tiny one too big!
 

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I would go for it also, depending on how the breeder checks out, the health texting, what 'basic training' means, and if it is snugly lovable, .... or if it has bad habits like barking a lot, chasing people, agression, etc? Some people just think that basic training means it is housebroken. (To me basic training means it has at least passed the CGC).

I too am interested in the size (I would prefer a standard or a mini) and who the breeder is. If it passed all of the things prior mentioned, and is a standard or a mini, I would see how you get along, and then take it to a neutral vet for a check up. ................ Yes, it could be lots of fun, if it is the right dog for you!
 
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