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Discussion Starter #1
I predict that everyone will tell me this is a bad idea.
I have an almost 7 month old female standard poodle. She’s not perfect and still needs to learn some things but she’s a pretty good girl. I’ve been waiting to get another puppy until she is well trained. She has lots of energy so I want her To have a buddy!
We love in California and we are a shelter at home state. My daughter is 14 and home schooling now because of it for the next few months. Because we can’t leave our house nor can anyone else I feel like right now is the perfect time to get another puppy. I just don’t see a more perfect time than now.
Please give me your thoughts/opinions/advice.
thank you!!
 

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I'll be the downer and say: This is actually not a very good time to get a puppy. :( Socialization would suffer tremendously. Our trainer has been getting calls and emails from people in this exact position and they're panicking. No puppy classes. No meet and greets. No interactions with a variety of dogs and humans.

At the very least, I'd wait until you're allowed to interact with the world again so your puppy gets a good start. That early socialization window is so small and soooo important.

Or (and I personally love this idea) consider an older dog. You might even be able to find one from an excellent breeder, and then you'd have the added bonus of getting a doggy mentor for Willow!

Willow is heading deep into adolescence right now, and some of the biggest behavioural challenges can emerge in the next year.
 

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I completely agree with PeggyTheParti. I wouldn’t because you would miss out on that crucial socialization stage. Some dogs are resilient and can make up the difference later while others will be permanently damaged and suffer difficulties.

Instead of a new puppy, make a short list of what behavior you want to train your current puppy. You can ask for help here or find training videos on line to work on. Look for some fun tricks and involve your daughter.
 

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If you are ready for a puppy, and have one in mind, and don't have to shop around and get exposed to a lot of homes, it could be a good time.

I never experienced issues with socialization, and I have been raising dogs for a really long time without ever needing to consider it.
So if you prefer classes, interactions, etc to socialize your dogs, then I'd agree with Peggy's keeper.
Outside resources for socialization just has never been a requirement for any of our dogs and they have all had exceptional manners and balanced personalities.
I guess it depends on your lifestyle and how you integrate your dog into it, and what has worked best for you in the past.

As for the adolescence- I've had problems with that with a single dog at home- (just one rottie,) but when I have had multiples, I really didn't notice- probably because they were
partners in crime and I just lowered my standards at the time. ^.^ I don't think that a puppy would make it worse and it might make it easier.

I honestly would tell you not to wait too long because I'd love to have another puppy but now that Noodle is nearly 2 and in easy mode- I'm quite reluctant to take on the
challenge, whereas six months ago I already had him picked out but we decided to buy a second home and I had to tell the breeder
I wanted to wait until we were unpacked and settled. Now that we are- I'm just not ready for all the work involved- I keep thinking maybe later :)

If you are up to the task, I'd say go for it!
(keep in mind that a puppy who has been with his mom for 12 weeks is a lot easier to train than an 8 week old.)
 

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Outside resources for socialization just has never been a requirement for any of our dogs and they have all had exceptional manners and balanced personalities.
Just so I understand - Your puppies didn't meet a variety of people? I'm talking neighbours, store employees, other owners on walks, children, visiting family members.... Just all those normal interactions that aren't currently possible. Your puppies didn't have those?

Same goes for meeting a variety of other dogs.

Socialization doesn't need to be a structured thing. But the experiences a puppy has in that window are formative, regardless of temperament.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Willows breeder and vet told me to not let Willow out of our house AT ALL for like four months. They had me so paranoid about parvo I did what they said. Willow interacted with my daughter and I in our home and a few times a week my parents came over and saw her for like ten minutes. We took her out in the car for school drop off and pickups. She would see all the kids from the car. Beyond that willow didn’t start puppy class until she was four months. I’m not sure if she’s just special but she’s done fine with other dogs and people. She loves everyone. Is this rare??
 

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Willows breeder and vet told me to not let Willow out of our house AT ALL for like four months. They had me so paranoid about parvo I did what they said. Willow interacted with my daughter and I in our home and a few times a week my parents came over and saw her for like ten minutes. We took her out in the car for school drop off and pickups. She would see all the kids from the car. Beyond that willow didn’t start puppy class until she was four months. I’m not sure if she’s just special but she’s done fine with other dogs and people. She loves everyone. Is this rare??

Nope.
We lived on a farm- several acres. No neighbors, no puppy classes,
1 trip to Birmingham when she was 5 months old evacuating for hurricane, she was fine.
Fine with new people, new dogs, new hotels, sitting in the car.
She went to her first dog park at 16 months, she played very well with everyone, even some very impolite dogs.
 

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You can make it work. Even with social distancing. That said, my boy, Buck took every second of three years and then some to mature. If you’ve got the energy, the training chops, the time and a fenced yard, a puppy might be a godsend. I would love to have another little rascal these days, but it isn’t in the cards. Sigh.
 

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There ya go! Some diverse perspectives and experiences to weigh, including your own.

Personally, I've won the easy temperament lottery annnnd I've also been challenged in expected and unexpected ways. I've even had to rehome a dog (a gut-wrenching failure for which I take full responsibility.....but thankfully one with an extremely happy ending for that sweet little boy).

All you can do is make your decision with a clear head and your whole heart.

And keep in mind—whether it's now or a year from now—we'll be here to ooh and ahh over your puppy pics. MOST of us are in a perpetual state of puppy fever. I've got my next five or so lined up. 😂
 

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A few things come to mind.

First, if your current dog is not 100% housebroken (at 7 months there is a good chance it isn’t), then it will regress and you will end up with two dogs soiling the house. It will be harder to train the new pup and having to retrain the current one will add to the equation.

Also, your current dog is not finished teething and it hasn’t gotten through puberty yet. You haven’t done the hardest part with this dog. Adding a puppy on top will make it a lot more than double the trouble. Coat change, another challenge, hasn’t happened yet. This means a lot more work too.

Last but not least, this new puppy needs to learn the « real » family routine, as this situation will not last forever. Which means if you’re usually not home, then you have to find ways to leave him on his own and create a routine resembling the « real » one so that when things go back to normal, you don’t end up with an anxious dog who destroys the house because he’s upset his owners are not with him all day long.

Having said that, if you have solutions for all these important problems, then it could be feasible. But I don’t personally think now is a better time to get a new puppy then it would have been before this crisis, because routine is so very important to dogs, just like children, and what is happening right now has taken most people right out of their usual routines.
 
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