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So I’m posting just to get some comfort really... I was grooming Norman today and had him on the table and he’s normally great with the table. He has never tried to jump or anything. Sometimes he will bite are the neck string but that’s it.
Today I was trying to do his paws and he was not too thrilled. I had my mom come in and pet him while I did his feet which helped.
Once I was done I turned around to put down the brush and then take him off the table. In a matter of seconds my dad walks in and talks to my mom and my mom then turns around and let go of Norman. I quickly went to grab Norman who got excited to see my dad (who thought we was released from the neckholder) and he jumped. I watched him hang from the table and I immediately had to flip the table on its side for him to get to the ground and be released. I can’t stop picturing that moment.
I am horrified. He was released ran away and has been happy ever since but shaken up. I of course cried I was so upset. After checking on Norman I went back to pick it all up. I came back to a broken table, clamp, blade, and comb. These materials means nothing in comparison to Norman, but it’s just so much at once I’m stressed out by it. Glad he’s okay though. He’s been giving me extra attention since it happened.
 

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That was scary. Glad he’s okay. He may need some desensitization next time he’s on the table to get comfortable before you do any grooming.

When my dog is on the table, I never turn my back. I have a tall set of plastic drawers next to the grooming table. It’s where I store all my grooming supplies. I pull everything out and have it handy so it’s easy to grab while grooming. The drawers are organized so if I didn’t plan ahead well, I can easily open and grab what I need while still keeping an eye or even a hand on my dog. If you had something like this or a shelf or table top next to the grooming table you can be organized so you wouldn’t have to turn your back.

You should discuss and have a plan about distractions with your parents. He’s still young and he was excited to see them. I know you will figure out a way to never have this happen again.
 

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OMG how horrifying! I'm so glad he's okay. You must be so shaken up! I never turn my back or take a hand off of the dogs when I'm grooming them. But I've had many close calls over the years that taught me to be uber-careful.
 

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Oh that is terribly scary for sure. I agree with Skylar about desensitization (counterconditioning for Norman and you). I also think you need a protocol about who can show up while Norman is on the grooming table. Nobody is allowed to visit while I groom.
 
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So I’m posting just to get some comfort really... I was grooming Norman today and had him on the table and he’s normally great with the table. He has never tried to jump or anything. Sometimes he will bite are the neck string but that’s it.
Today I was trying to do his paws and he was not too thrilled. I had my mom come in and pet him while I did his feet which helped.
Once I was done I turned around to put down the brush and then take him off the table. In a matter of seconds my dad walks in and talks to my mom and my mom then turns around and let go of Norman. I quickly went to grab Norman who got excited to see my dad (who thought we was released from the neckholder) and he jumped. I watched him hang from the table and I immediately had to flip the table on its side for him to get to the ground and be released. I can’t stop picturing that moment.
I am horrified. He was released ran away and has been happy ever since but shaken up. I of course cried I was so upset. After checking on Norman I went back to pick it all up. I came back to a broken table, clamp, blade, and comb. These materials means nothing in comparison to Norman, but it’s just so much at once I’m stressed out by it. Glad he’s okay though. He’s been giving me extra attention since it happened.
This is one of the main reasons I train my dogs, from the very first time they are up on it, to stay on the grooming table WITHOUT being hooked up to a grooming post. I never use one. In the unlikely event they do jump, or even for some reason, fall, off the table, they can never be hung. I can leave them on a down stay and leave the room and they will remain on the table. I would keep an eye on him for a bit. I know someone recently whose smaller dog fell off the table when being groomed and hung for just a few seconds, and had some back issues as a result that necessitated a visit to the dog chiro.
 

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Thanks all. And Norman usually stays on the table without the neck rope but I had to put it on while doing feet. I normally never turn my back but it happened. I will be for sure to never do it again. Out grooming table is set up right next to a table with all my tools. I just happen to be looking away a second too long. And I agree there needs to be some type of protocol but for now I’m just going to give him a lot of treats and happy praise while being in the room
 

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This is very scary ! I can understand why you were so upset. I’m sure Norman has forgotten all about it already but it might be harder on you.

I’ve never used a grooming post either. Mine are toys but they don’t move from the table. I never leave them without supervision of course.

Forgive yourself, mistakes happen. What’s mot important is that nobody was hurt.
 

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I'm so glad Norman wasn't hurt and I hope you're recovering from the scare.
 

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Accidents happen. Glad this one had a good outcome. It is very difficult to train parents... so, that means you should work on the dog. When you are not really grooming put him on the table and handle his feet and reward him with a high value treat for staying put. For now, learn from your "mistake". Reward yourself for being quick to come up with a solution. One time my daughter's Rottweiler got his collar stuck on his crate. The crate was not shut; he had just wandered in and somehow managed to tangle the collar in the crate door handle. He panicked and was thrashing around. My daughter screamed for me, and I realized that we were either going to have to undo the collar, or cut the crate handle. This rotty was the sweetest thing, but one hundred pounds of scared pup with a mouthful of big teeth was not my idea of fun. Somehow I was able to lift the pup up, which put enough slack on the collar, allowing my daughter to remove his collar. In the back of my mind I had been thinking I was going to have to run out to the garage and get the bolt cutters. Whew, disaster averted! So, yes, I know exactly how you felt. We decided then, that the Rotty would not wear a collar in the house. You will figure out what works best for you in your situation. Good catch, or tilt, what ever you want to call it.(y)
 

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Yes very scary and thank you for the thoughts. I hate that some of you have had scary experienced too but I guess that is what teaches us valuable lessons. We will go back today or tomorrow with some yummy treats and training skills to not jump off until I say so. Until then, I have to find replacement tools before I can groom again. :)
 

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Found some replacement parts that I am hoping will do the trick! Thankfully a LOT cheaper than expected. Makes things a bit better!
 

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If you have ever been to a dog show, you probably noticed that almost all the poodles were sitting calmly on their grooming tables with nothing attached to their necks (it messes with that long show coat!).
 

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Yes very scary and thank you for the thoughts. I hate that some of you have had scary experienced too but I guess that is what teaches us valuable lessons. We will go back today or tomorrow with some yummy treats and training skills to not jump off until I say so. Until then, I have to find replacement tools before I can groom again. :)
If you plan to train him to stay on the table, I wouldn't ever let him jump off, even when "you say so". That reinforces that they "can" jump off. Mine are never allowed to do so even when they are done. I always lift them (Standards) off and put them on the floor when the grooming session is finished.
 

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Accidents happen. Glad this one had a good outcome. It is very difficult to train parents... so, that means you should work on the dog. When you are not really grooming put him on the table and handle his feet and reward him with a high value treat for staying put. For now, learn from your "mistake". Reward yourself for being quick to come up with a solution. One time my daughter's Rottweiler got his collar stuck on his crate. The crate was not shut; he had just wandered in and somehow managed to tangle the collar in the crate door handle. He panicked and was thrashing around. My daughter screamed for me, and I realized that we were either going to have to undo the collar, or cut the crate handle. This rotty was the sweetest thing, but one hundred pounds of scared pup with a mouthful of big teeth was not my idea of fun. Somehow I was able to lift the pup up, which put enough slack on the collar, allowing my daughter to remove his collar. In the back of my mind I had been thinking I was going to have to run out to the garage and get the bolt cutters. Whew, disaster averted! So, yes, I know exactly how you felt. We decided then, that the Rotty would not wear a collar in the house. You will figure out what works best for you in your situation. Good catch, or tilt, what ever you want to call it.(y)
Had a similar episode with Peggy when she was very young. Her collar somehow caught on a low cabinet knob (the physics still baffle me) and within seconds she had twisted it, trying to get loose, and was choking herself. Absolutely terrifying how fast these things can happen. I don't like to think about the outcome had I not been there.
 

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That is so scary. I've heard of that happening at grooming shops sometimes and heard horror stories of dogs strangling to death because no one was supervising them. I'm so glad you were right there and had such quick reflexes.

I don't know how it is with standards....maybe it doesn't work. But with my toy poodle, Matisse, when he was young and at shows before his hair was all finished being "done up," he'd be in the noose on the table. This was when he was a puppy and hadn't learned to stay still that well. The cord had no slack in it. There was no physical way he could step off the edge of the table in any direction. I still hung around but some other people would wander away, leaving their dogs. I just couldn't. I'm one of those, what if, what it kind of people.

He and Maurice both learned to stay put though when they got a little older. Nowadays I groom on the kitchen table with a big vinyl table cloth on it...no noose needed. I can walk out of the room and they stay put even though they could jump down onto one of the upholstered chairs and then down to the floor if they wanted to without getting hurt. But they don't. They don't think there's an option because they've never been able to get down by themselves...so they just stand there or lie down when I go into the laundry room to get another tool or something I might have forgotten to bring out to the kitchen. So they can learn. But yeah, just like I never ever call a dog from a stay, I wouldn't recommend letting your poodle jump down by himself. Soon you won't need the noose. I like the idea of no one allowed to come around while you're grooming, at least until he's very well trained to stand still no matter what. Some of that training may require some mild distraction to start with and let him know he's to stay put.

Those are some scary stories about collars getting caught on things and almost strangling. How absolutely horrifying! I've heard many such stories but also many without happy endings. My own Doberman breeder found one of her Dobes dead when two of them were playing and one got his teeth and jaws hung up on the collar. So sad. These stories are why, for decades I have never left collars on my dogs in the house. The only time they wear harnesses (in the case of the toys) is for walks. Of course harnesses are less likely to strangle them, but something could happen that we don't expect. One time one of mine got a leg through the place where it's not suppose to go and it made it very tight by his neck. Of course I was right there and noticed. Even in crates in the car...all collars and leashes, harnesses off. And no toys because I can't see what's going on. I wouldn't know if one was choking on something or not. I never leave them with toys or chew things if I'm not around to supervise. I've heard way too many horrible stories.

I'm glad it all turned out okay Sammie Norman. I'm sure he'll get right back onto it. And it's good you found replacements for a reasonable price. Whew!
 

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PB, I've considered doing that, too, but do you worry about what would happen if they somehow got away and weren't wearing their collars? Especially in the car, if there were an accident. I have a hard time weighing the relative risks.
 

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That is so scary. I've heard of that happening at grooming shops sometimes and heard horror stories of dogs strangling to death because no one was supervising them. I'm so glad you were right there and had such quick reflexes.

I don't know how it is with standards....maybe it doesn't work. But with my toy poodle, Matisse, when he was young and at shows before his hair was all finished being "done up," he'd be in the noose on the table. This was when he was a puppy and hadn't learned to stay still that well. The cord had no slack in it. There was no physical way he could step off the edge of the table in any direction. I still hung around but some other people would wander away, leaving their dogs. I just couldn't. I'm one of those, what if, what it kind of people.

He and Maurice both learned to stay put though and when they got a little older they learned to stay put. Nowadays I groom on the kitchen table with a big vinyl table cloth on it...no noose needed. I can walk out of the room and they stay put even though they could jump down onto one of the upholstered chairs and then down to the floor if they wanted to without getting hurt. But they don't. They don't think there's an option because they've never been able to get down by themselves...so they just stand there when I go into the laundry room to get another tool or something I might have forgotten to bring out to the kitchen. So they can learn. But yeah, just like I never ever call a dog from a stay, I wouldn't recommend letting your poodle jump down by himself. Soon you won't need the noose. I like the idea of no one allowed to come around while you're grooming, at least until he's very well trained to stand still no matter what. Some of that training may require some mild distraction to start with and let him know he's to stay put.

Those are some scary stories about collars getting caught on things and almost strangling. How absolutely horrifying! I've heard many such stories but also many without happy endings. My own Doberman breeder found one of her Dobes dead when two of them were playing and one got his teeth and jaws hung up on the collar. So sad. These stories are why, for decades I have never left collars on my dogs in the house. The only time they wear harnesses (in the case of the toys) is for walks. Of course harnesses are less likely to strangle them, but something could happen that we don't expect. Once one of mine got a leg through the place where it's not suppose to go and it made it very tight by his neck. Of course I was right there and noticed. Even in crates in the car...all collars and leashes, harnesses off. And no toys because I can't see what's going on. I wouldn't know if one was choking on something or not. I never leave them with toys or chew things if I'm not around to supervise. I've heard way too many horrible stories.

I'm glad it all turned out okay Sammie Norman. I'm sure he'll get right back onto it. And it's good you found replacements for a reasonable price. Whew!
Yes, PB, my dogs NEVER wear collars in the house or yard. The only time they have collars on is when they are being walked/trained/shown, in their crates when we are in the car (I don't use wire crates, so there feel the chance of getting caught on anything is less a risk than them not having ID should there be an accident and they get out of the crates) or at any other time when I am on the end of the leash. Besides worrying that they could hook a collar on something and self-strangle, they play and mouth each other all the time around the neck and the chance of one getting caught in the other's collar and twisting is just not something I will risk. I personally know 2 people, both experienced dog people, who had collars on when they don't usually, whose dogs got a bottom jaw caught in the collar of another one of their dogs. In one case, by the time the suffocating dog was freed, she had blood vessels burst in her eyes and needed to have a follow up with an ophthalmologist to make sure there was no permanent damage. In the other, the dog had already passed out when he was able to be freed and if the owners had not known how to do artificial respiration, they would have lost him. As it was, he spent a couple days at the vet afterwards. In one case, the dogs were small and the other medium-sized. I can't imagine trying to free 2 thrashing, twisting standards, or trying to cut a collar, which is often the only way to separate. If I absolutely felt I had to keep collars on my dogs, it would only be the breakaway safety ones....
 
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PB, I've considered doing that, too, but do you worry about what would happen if they somehow got away and weren't wearing their collars? Especially in the car, if there were an accident. I have a hard time weighing the relative risks.
It's a personal choice. I weighed the risks and the risk of strangling to me is so horrific. My dogs are micro chipped and they won't run off if they "escape." So for me, the risk of death by strangulation scares me a whole lot more.
 

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I am so sorry you had to experience this kind of accident. I know that had to be ultra scary. Don’t beat yourself up about it though, but look at it as a learning experience. Now you know to not look away, and not letting him jump on or off the table. He should always be lifted both ways.

I had my little chi that I carried around in a handbag (for dogs). It had a short tether to clip on his leash ring so that he couldn’t jump out. I had used this most days for several months. So one day, when I had my hands full and was walking to the car, guess what he did? He tried to jump out, which threw his butt over his head and he twisted in the air and was hanging. I was able to get the handbag on the ground without dropping it (but everything else I was holding went flying). He was okay, but never tried that again. And yes, he was still comfortable in the bag.

What happened with Norman and my Bucky is just proof that the least expected things can, and will, happen. Don’t lose heart, it’s just a tiny blip in the whole scheme of things. Thank God he is okay and you are able to deal with it.
 
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