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Discussion Starter #1
I was so excited 2 weeks ago to tell everyone that we were starting agility! Sort of...
I live in a smaller but booming city near a big city but we still have a lot of catching up to do in infrastructure and opportunities. I have wanted to do agility or some type of competitive activity even if just for fun. We travelled down to the city for 2 levels of basic obedience classes but the closest agility is about 1.5 hours away. The drive is not good much of the year because it’s a dark and windy coastal highway with heavy rain, poor visibility, sometimes snow and a lot of bad skier traffic etc.
You can imagine my delight when I ran into a woman in the spring who just moved here and was an agility instructor. I explained that many people would be interested and there apparently used to be a club here but no one knows where the equipment is, and there is a space issue.
So she just started courses, but is still working on a covered space. We started last Monday and it’s in a school field with some basic equipment she ordered.
I am trying to be positive but the first class was super casual, lasted only 35 minutes (I thought it was an hour) and Sage’s two best dog friends are the only other participants (the goose poop on the field doesn’t help!)

Any thoughts on how I can make sure I teach him the skills in a way that would transfer to a proper ring and to focus in such an environment? I will ask the instructor but like a lot of things in my town, it is so far pretty “cas(ual.”)
We had fun but he did want to play with his buddies and I am really new to this.
I am on a waitlist for a formal agility class in the city but they haven’t offered any yet on weekends and I’m not sure about the drive in winter.
It’s good to be just down the road, I guess I am just a little disappointed even though I knew it was just in a field!!
Jen
 

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I would make sure Sage has great impulse control in exciting environments so that you will be able to have reliable start line stays. You can also make sure you teach clear criteria for the contact obstacles. So decide if you want running contacts or stopped contacts (generally would be two on two off) and teach the contacts that way. If there is a teeter on the field make sure you lower it (ideally) and teach it to build confidence showing Sage that it moves and makes noise.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Catherine.
Being new it’s hard to know what to start with! I will talk to the trainer - she does seem to know what she’s doing (as far as I know!)
Thank you so much for giving me something to work on! We’ll see how things progress in the course.
 

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Thanks Catherine.
Being new it’s hard to know what to start with! I will talk to the trainer - she does seem to know what she’s doing (as far as I know!)
Thank you so much for giving me something to work on! We’ll see how things progress in the course.

I hope it works well for you and that you and Sage have fun.
 
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