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Discussion Starter #1
For whatever reason, Sabrina bloated again. I took her out of her crate in the morning and she waddled out in full bloat. She has been tacked so I gave her some GasX and waited to see if she would pass the gas herself. No such luck, so it was off to the vet where they put a tube down her throat. She's fine now.

Bloat is clearly a serious problem in Sabrina's line. I found out last week that another full sibling bloated and died and that two littermates coming down from Sabrina's sire who were both under 3 yrs of age also bloated. This brings the total to 9 dogs that we know about. :(

I just want to stress again how important I think a prophylactic gastropexy (tack) is. If a Poodle is not tacked, it always runs the risk of torsion. When that stomach flips, it can be very hard to save the dog's life.
 

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How horrible, I'm glad to hear she's ok now. Perhaps the problems occuring in Sabrina's line will help Poodle Breeders understand the possible genetic component to bloat better. Do you know if any research is being done in that area?
 

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Purdue famously did their bloat study, but that was a while ago. I don't know who is studying bloat now.

I wish I could get breeders to wake up and take Bloat seriously. Every time I hear a breeder say that bloat is environmental and not familial, I want to scream!
 

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I'm sorry to hear about Sabrina!! I am glad she is doing better now!!

How do you feel about raised food dishes to prevent bloat? I have heard that they can increase the risk of bloat, but then I have heard some vets say that is not true.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm sorry to hear about Sabrina!! I am glad she is doing better now!!

How do you feel about raised food dishes to prevent bloat? I have heard that they can increase the risk of bloat, but then I have heard some vets say that is not true.
Purdue study showed that there was actually an increased risk of bloat with raised dishes, but theorized that the correlation might be due to the fact that owners with breeds at risk for bloat often used raised food bowls.

So anyway... no. Raised food bowls don't help.
 

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I'm so sorry to hear this Cbrand. It must be very upsetting to have to worry through these episodes. I am happy to hear that everything came out ok.
 

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I, too, am glad to hear that Sabrina is okay! I can't imagine how scary it is to see her like that. Is a bloated dog very obviously bloated?
 

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Oh, I'm so sorry....poor Sabrina, and what a worry for you.
It upsets me, too, when breeders put their heads in the sand and say that bloat is not genetic. It so clearly runs in lines.
As far as I know, any studies have failed to pinpoint exactly what causes a dog to bloat. Certainly, anatomically, torsion is more likely to happen to a dog with a deep chest. But the bloat episode precedes torsion...wish we knew what causes it. It's a horrible experience for both dog and owner.
All the best to Sabrina for a speedy recovery.
 

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I, too, am glad to hear that Sabrina is okay! I can't imagine how scary it is to see her like that. Is a bloated dog very obviously bloated?
When Henry bloated he did not appear bloated at all. He was spinning in circles, wining, rolling and biting at his stomach though, so I suspected bloat. The vet did not think he was bloated upon examination because his stomach was not distended, but did x-rays to be sure. Sure enough, he was bloated and twisted.

Vet said as Henry was on the operating table, his stomach was rapidly distending. Maybe he twisted first? No idea.

To answer your question, I think they often do appear bloated, but not always.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
You can tell with Sabrina because she blows up like a drum. Seriously, she is like three times larger in size. It is quite a thing to see.

Many dogs don't do this though, and I think ChocolateMillie's dog, Henry, is an excellent example of why owners need to know the various signs of Bloat. Bloat is a time sensitive disorder. It is absolutely not a case of taking a "wait and see approach".

I think this is an excellent article on the value of doing diagnostic X-rays if bloat is suspected:

If you read NOTHING else, Please read this about Bloat
 

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So sorry to hear that you are going thru another round of bloat with Sabrina, Carol. Fortunately, you are all too familiar with the needed response time. Thank goodness, she'll be ok.

Thank you for sharing the link to The Purdue Study. It is very informative.

It does appear that there are varying degrees of visible signs of abdominal expansion. According to Dr. Glickman @ Purdue, "deep-chested dogs may have a large portion of their stomachs under their rib cage which makes the distention less obvious." Conceivably, it may be easier to see distention in a standard with a more narrow rib cage than those with a wider rib cage.
There is still so much to learn about this risk to our precious breed.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Here is another good article on bloat:

PREVENTION OF BLOAT AND TORSION IN DOGS
Interesting connection about bacteria and bloat. We did go hiking on Monday and both dogs drank stagnant trail water. Delilah got some wacky, liquid diarrhea but Sabrina seemed ok. Maybe the bloat is connected to picking up bacteria from the water?

One thing.... That article says that bloat is unknown in dogs who eat a raw, protein diet. I personally know a Great Dane who was fed only raw and who still bloated and died at age 4.
 

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I'm so glad that she is ok now. What a scary experience. Its fortunate that you are so experienced and know how to handle it.
 
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