Poodle Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone had experience with retinal atrophy and/cataracts in their poodles? I understand it's a genetic trait. Mine developed RA at five (she's now nine) and was managing until a giant cataract developed in one eye. I'm taking her to the doggie optho this month, and I might consider an operation for the cataract in that one eye. Anything to help this brave girl would be worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,686 Posts
I can't tell you about treatment or prognosis, but you bring up an important point that can't be made enough.

Toy and Mini poodles, but not Standards, have a genetic form of Progressive Retinal Atrophy known as prcd-PRA. This condition causes juvenile blindness usually starting around age 4-5. The condition is only expressed in Poodles who have two copies of the gene and are thus affected. There is no cure and affected Poodles will go blind.

Since the early 2000s there has been a genetic test (Optigen) to identify the gene in Poodles. This test lets breeders know if a dog is Clear (A), Carrier (B) or Affected (C). By breeding only As or As to Bs, breeders can avoid producing Cs. Unfortunately for the OP, the test probably came a bit too late.

Poodles of all varieties are also subject to cataracts which can cause blindness. Because of this, all breeding Poodles of all varieties should have their eyes evaluated every year via a CERF exam.

Anyone looking to buy a Toy or Miniature Poodle should make sure that the dam and sire of a litter have been Optigen and CERF tested.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the RA info

Thanks very much for the info. We got Friday in 2001, just on the cusp of this new test, alas.

The parents were supposedly champs, and I doubt the breeder knew about this. We got our full price back for another problem. Teeth nearly in an underbite. Cost us 500 to get the baby ones pulled. Her adult teeth are so so, but not show quality. We didn't intend to show her anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,398 Posts
Cbrand:
Is it possible to go to the vet and simply ask for the test? Or would you have to seek out a vet that does the test?

Lou Allin:
(Tate is about the age where this begins to affect the dogs, and I would rather know now than really late whether or not this will be a worry.) What is the course of treatment for Friday on a daily basis? Eye drops/etc?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,737 Posts
My previous toy had PRA. Since it is the retina that is affected, there is no daily treatment or medication to treat it. Things may have changed since then, but from what I know, there are not many options as far as treatment is concerned.

I'll keep your little one in my thoughts and prayers as you decide what to do. If it's any conciliation, blindness is a slow process which means they can acclimate pretty well. As an owner, you can't let yourself be in denial. The dog will need your help to get through their daily routine, especially when you are away from home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Recovery SA for RA

Friday gets a daily half teaspoon of Recovery SA, which supposedly not only helps joints, but supplies a vitamin (D?, A?) which slows the retinal deterioration. Honestly it's the overnight cataract which is doing the most harm. She's seeing the doggie Optho this month.

It is a slowish process, four years plus in all, and so far she is doing very well. Most people would not suspect she is growing blind until she bumps into one of the other dogs or something obvious. Still jumps onto the bed and into the car.

Lou
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top