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Hey there!

Someday down the road I want to learn to groom on my own, and I plan on keeping my dog's hair short (1/2"-1" cut overall). I've read through a bunch of threads on here and looked at different recommendations, but it seems a lot of items are particularly necessary only if you have longer hair?

So I just wanted to see what the most important stuff are if the dog's hair would be kept fairly short.

Right now on my list are: Force dryer, 5-in-1 clipper, grooming table, slicker brush, buttercomb, pin brush. How much of those are necessary in this scenario? Am I missing anything? Also, is the table with the loop/harness a big necessity vs., say, just doing it on a kitchen island or something?

Thank you for any help!
 

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Kitchen island is probably fine. I think the list is good. Personally I don't use a pin brush but some like it. If your dog is smaller you can get by with just the 5in1 bravura. Spoo coats are typically too dense for them but minis and toys are often soft enough. But you will definitely want the metal combs that go with the bravura.
 

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Kitchen island is probably fine. I think the list is good. Personally I don't use a pin brush but some like it. If your dog is smaller you can get by with just the 5in1 bravura. Spoo coats are typically too dense for them but minis and toys are often soft enough. But you will definitely want the metal combs that go with the bravura.
Ahh ok, yeah I saw in the reviews for the Bravura that it was a bit tough for Standard Poodles, which is what I will have. Is there a different Wahl line more suited for them? Or is Andis better?
 

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Ahh ok, yeah I saw in the reviews for the Bravura that it was a bit tough for Standard Poodles, which is what I will have. Is there a different Wahl line more suited for them? Or is Andis better?
Andis or Wahl are both good. Andis 5 speed and wahl km 5 are similar I think. But I'd still use a bravura for face and feet.
 

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I would say, if you are going to use the kitchen island think about how your Spoo will get up and down. When my pup was little, I just lifted him up on the kitchen table. Then I started hoisting him up on a chair then onto the table and then gently lifted him and to set him down floor. Eventually I didn’t think this approach was good for either of us and I bought a nice ramp. Depending on your plan, a ramp may or may not be needed. Not sure how other folks who groom their spoos on a regular table deal with this. I’m guessing size of the person matters. Bobby got too heavy for me to lift up and down and I felt like I was squeezing him and was worried I would hurt him. I think a grooming table would be lovely but it’s just another thing to have in our small house. The kitchen table works perfectly for us. I don’t use any kind of restraint but he is very good at staying on the table. The ramp just folds up and is easily stored. If you decide to go the kitchen island route, get some kind of mat so your dog is secure and doesn’t slip. I just bought a washable bath mat with rubber like backing which works like a charm.
 

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Ahh ok, yeah I saw in the reviews for the Bravura that it was a bit tough for Standard Poodles, which is what I will have. Is there a different Wahl line more suited for them? Or is Andis better?
Are you bringing home a puppy? Puppy fur is soft and you won’t need the heavy duty clippers at first. Of course if that’s all you have you can. I went for a while to a professional groomer who only used heavy duty clippers because she broke her Wahl Bravura and couldn’t afford to fix them.

You should be able to groom a spoo puppy with a Bravura. Until your dog is grown and had the coat change you won’t know if your dog needs the heavy clipper or if the bravura is enough. Many spoo owners just use a bravura.

Wahl and Andis are equally popular and their higher end equipment is used by professionals in grooming salons where they need quality equipment

If you can afford both you’ll use them both. If your dogs coat is too thick you can use them for face sanitary and feet.
 
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I would find the kitchen counter fine for a mini, but too high for comfortably grooming Peggy. I use our ottoman for all brushing now. I can stand for the upper bits, and sit on my couch when I need to get at her belly and legs.

But I'll be honest - I've yet to find the right brush for her body and legs. Her hair is too short for everything I've tried. A slicker is the only thing that actually grabs and detangles the hair, but it's impossible to use on her legs without making repeated contact with her skin/bones. I've googled "best brush for short poodle hair" more times than I can count!

Will be following this thread with interest. :)

For reference: The hair I'm struggling with was cut with a 7 blade about a month ago. So it's getting too long to ignore, but is still too short for all my tools.
 

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I would say, if you are going to use the kitchen island think about how your Spoo will get up and down. When my pup was little, I just lifted him up on the kitchen table. Then I started hoisting him up on a chair then onto the table and then gently lifted him and to set him down floor. Eventually I didn’t think this approach was good for either of us and I bought a nice ramp. Depending on your plan, a ramp may or may not be needed. Not sure how other folks who groom their spoos on a regular table deal with this. I’m guessing size of the person matters. Bobby got too heavy for me to lift up and down and I felt like I was squeezing him and was worried I would hurt him. I think a grooming table would be lovely but it’s just another thing to have in our small house. The kitchen table works perfectly for us. I don’t use any kind of restraint but he is very good at staying on the table. The ramp just folds up and is easily stored. If you decide to go the kitchen island route, get some kind of mat so your dog is secure and doesn’t slip. I just bought a washable bath mat with rubber like backing which works like a charm.
Good point, I need to consider that. I'd like to think I'm strong enough to continue lifting but we'll see 😂
 

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Are you bringing home a puppy? Puppy fur is soft and you won’t need the heavy duty clippers at first. Of course if that’s all you have you can. I went for a while to a professional groomer who only used heavy duty clippers because she broke her Wahl Bravura and couldn’t afford to fix them.

You should be able to groom a spoo puppy with a Bravura. Until your dog is grown and had the coat change you won’t know if your dog needs the heavy clipper or if the bravura is enough. Many spoo owners just use a bravura.

Wahl and Andis are equally popular and their higher end equipment is used by professionals in grooming salons where they need quality equipment

If you can afford both you’ll use them both. If your dogs coat is too thick you can use them for face sanitary and feet.
Hadn't even considered that, yes she will be a puppy when brought home. And that sounds like a great idea since I've seen a lot of comments about people having another set for FFT anyways!
 

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I would find the kitchen counter fine for a mini, but too high for comfortably grooming Peggy. I use our ottoman for all brushing now. I can stand for the upper bits, and sit on my couch when I need to get at her belly and legs.

But I'll be honest - I've yet to find the right brush for her body and legs. Her hair is too short for everything I've tried. A slicker is the only thing that actually grabs and detangles the hair, but it's impossible to use on her legs without making repeated contact with her skin/bones. I've googled "best brush for short poodle hair" more times than I can count!

Will be following this thread with interest. :)

For reference: The hair I'm struggling with was cut with a 7 blade about a month ago. So it's getting too long to ignore, but is still too short for all my tools.
I still have a few months before bringing my pup home but I really want to be prepared on all the grooming/daily care stuff beforehand, but my head is swimming with all the little details. Especially having to discern what works for longer hair vs. short hair, etc. I actually remember reading quite a few of your posts on various posts when I search so thank you!

For reference, I was wanting to keep the hair about this length: Pups

I remember seeing another comment that you could get away with just a pin comb on shorter hair, how well does that work exactly? Also, if I wanted to keep curls, what is the exact process you go through on grooming days (wetting the hair, blow drying, brushing, etc.), I keep getting turned around on the details!

Also, while we're on the subject (sorry for all the questions), what do you do in terms of daily/weekly care with short hair, on non-grooming days?
 

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I would find the kitchen counter fine for a mini, but too high for comfortably grooming Peggy. I use our ottoman for all brushing now. I can stand for the upper bits, and sit on my couch when I need to get at her belly and legs.

But I'll be honest - I've yet to find the right brush for her body and legs. Her hair is too short for everything I've tried. A slicker is the only thing that actually grabs and detangles the hair, but it's impossible to use on her legs without making repeated contact with her skin/bones. I've googled "best brush for short poodle hair" more times than I can count!

Will be following this thread with interest. :)

For reference: The hair I'm struggling with was cut with a 7 blade about a month ago. So it's getting too long to ignore, but is still too short for all my tools.
A counter would be too high for me too. We don’t have an island so I can’t speak for them but maybe they would be high compared to a traditional kitchen table. I am fairly short and the table works great but a few more inches would be trickier when Bobby is standing. It all depends on the height of the person. I use a cat brush to brush Bobby then a butter comb to follow up the brushing. When Bobby was really short I often just used a comb. It worked great but I have let his hair grow out a bit longer so I definitely have to brush first now. The bristles on the cat brushes (I have 2 different ones) are firm yet soft enough that they don’t hurt his skin. I don’t use the cat brushes on his topknot or tail. He really likes it when I brush him with these brushes. I think they massage his skin nicely.
 

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I still have a few months before bringing my pup home but I really want to be prepared on all the grooming/daily care stuff beforehand, but my head is swimming with all the little details. Especially having to discern what works for longer hair vs. short hair, etc. I actually remember reading quite a few of your posts on various posts when I search so thank you!

For reference, I was wanting to keep the hair about this length: Pups

I remember seeing another comment that you could get away with just a pin comb on shorter hair, how well does that work exactly? Also, if I wanted to keep curls, what is the exact process you go through on grooming days (wetting the hair, blow drying, brushing, etc.), I keep getting turned around on the details!

Also, while we're on the subject (sorry for all the questions), what do you do in terms of daily/weekly care with short hair, on non-grooming days?
I've yet to blowdry her myself. I'd planned to do professional groomings every four weeks, but our wonderful groomer is indefinitely off on sick leave. I'm reluctant to give any more groomers a chance after a bad experience last month, so we've found ourselves facing a steep learning curve. You're making the right decision educating yourself from the very beginning!

In between professional grooms, I wasn't doing much of anything. A slicker on her topknot to fluff it up, a daily wipe of her eyes with clean fingers or a warm cloth, but that was about it.

Now I'm brushing her every day. It's our rainy season, and we have a near-constant mist, so I just do it right after she comes inside. It takes me about five minutes, but I'm not having any real impact on her body and legs. A pin brush just seems to slide over it. A comb nicely catches tangles, but I need a tool for actually working through them.

It's all a little overwhelming for me, as I'm trying to learn without the safety net of a groomer I can call for an emergency appointment. Wish I'd started sooner like you are.

This book is helping a lot, but it's DENSE:

472202


Poodle Forum is also such a great resource.
 

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I've yet to blowdry her myself. I'd planned to do professional groomings every four weeks, but our wonderful groomer is indefinitely off on sick leave. I'm reluctant to give any more groomers a chance after a bad experience last month, so we've found ourselves facing a steep learning curve. You're making the right decision educating yourself from the very beginning!

In between professional grooms, I wasn't doing much of anything. A slicker on her topknot to fluff it up, a daily wipe of her eyes with clean fingers or a warm cloth, but that was about it.

Now I'm brushing her every day. It's our rainy season, and we have a near-constant mist, so I just do it right after she comes inside. It takes me about five minutes, but I'm not having any real impact on her body and legs. A pin brush just seems to slide over it. A comb nicely catches tangles, but I need a tool for actually working through them.

It's all a little overwhelming for me, as I'm trying to learn without the safety net of a groomer I can call for an emergency appointment. Wish I'd started sooner like you are.

This book is helping a lot, but it's DENSE:

View attachment 472202

Poodle Forum is also such a great resource.
I've seen that book around a lot but I wasn't sure how much I'd need it if I was planning on doing a straight, all-around trim with no scissor work or anything else.

And yeah, extremely overwhelming. I wish I could find something that showed a literal step by step for a short trim that I would want to do, that included all the other stuff besides the actual trim itself! I'm sure it's out there so I just gotta keep looking.
 

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I've seen that book around a lot but I wasn't sure how much I'd need it if I was planning on doing a straight, all-around trim with no scissor work or anything else.

And yeah, extremely overwhelming. I wish I could find something that showed a literal step by step for a short trim that I would want to do, that included all the other stuff besides the actual trim itself! I'm sure it's out there so I just gotta keep looking.
There's so much more to grooming than the trim, so I think you'd still find it useful. Understanding anal glands, ears, nails, eyes.... It can all get a little overwhelming.

I got my copy from the library and will keep signing it out as necessary (unless it shows up in my Christmas stocking).
 

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There's so much more to grooming than the trim, so I think you'd still find it useful. Understanding anal glands, ears, nails, eyes.... It can all get a little overwhelming.

I got my copy from the library and will keep signing it out as necessary (unless it shows up in my Christmas stocking).
Very good point, I'll check my local libraries for it as well!

How short does a #7 take the dog's hair, if you know? Does it curl back up afterwards?
 

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Very good point, I'll check my local libraries for it as well!

How short does a #7 take the dog's hair, if you know? Does it curl back up afterwards?
Here's the 7 on her legs and body, after being blowdried by the groomer.

472203


Here it is about a month later, after multiple soggy outdoor adventures and air dryings:

472204
 

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Here's the 7 on her legs and body, after being blowdried by the groomer.

View attachment 472203

Here it is about a month later, after multiple soggy outdoor adventures and air dryings:

View attachment 472204
Wow, what an absolutely gorgeous pup!!

That honestly looks like exactly what I'd want to do. Do you plan on doing the blowdrying yourself? Do you currently groom yourself and then get it dried at a groomers?
 

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Wow, what an absolutely gorgeous pup!!

That honestly looks like exactly what I'd want to do. Do you plan on doing the blowdrying yourself? Do you currently groom yourself and then get it dried at a groomers?
Our groomer did everything. We only decided to start grooming ourselves after this most recent appointment. We've got two different kinds of clippers (Andis corded UltraEdge, Wahl Bravura Lithium), a variety of combs and brushes, and a Waterpik attachment for the shower, but I think we'll have to invest in a high velocity dryer, too.

It's harder to get a nice even cut than it looks, and it seems that blowdrying the hair straight is essential. It also improves the efficiency of the clippers.

I groomed my last girl in her senior years, and she regularly looked like she'd been attacked by a lawnmower.
 

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If you are going to get a Standard you should absolutely should have a grooming table for the safety (non-slip surface, etc.) and comfort of the dog (and you) and get your puppy used to being on it and behaving as soon as possible after you bring him/her home. Even if not doing a full grooming, just for short time periods for some brushing, nail clipping, getting used to standing, sitting and laying down and staying, etc. Be firm and make it clear that they can't misbehave on the table, but be fair and encouraging and treat repeatedly for good behavior and make time on the table happy time as much as you can. Though many people do, I don't ever use a grooming post and loop on mine, they are taught from the time they are first home to stay on the table without one. If they ever should fall off the table, or the unlikely chance they do jump off, I don't want them attached to anything that could cause neck injury. As far as jumping off, since mine are taught they are never to jump off the table, I don't let them jump down when they are done. I take them off. I can leave either of them on a down on the table and go off into another room, whatever, and they will stay there as placed until I come back. When they are younger I let them jump on, but when they get older I lift them up. For instance, my 7 1/2 year old is still jumping on. My 13 year old gets picked up and put on the table. You can get a perfectly servicible stainless steel folding leg grooming table with non-skid top for about $125 from Pet Edge or many other pet suppliers for the size that would suit a Standard (36 x 24 x32). Mine is 14 years old and still in great condition after years of regular use with 2 Standards.....Of course, if $$ is no option and you want to go fancy, there are all sorts of hydraulic and electric tables for hundreds to thousands of dollars LOL:)
 
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Our groomer did everything. We only decided to start grooming ourselves after this most recent appointment. We've got two different kinds of clippers (Andis corded UltraEdge, Wahl Bravura Lithium), a variety of combs and brushes, and a Waterpik attachment for the shower, but I think we'll have to invest in a high velocity dryer, too.

It's harder to get a nice even cut than it looks, and it seems that blowdrying the hair straight is essential. It also improves the efficiency of the clippers.

I groomed my last girl in her senior years, and she regularly looked like she'd been attacked by a lawnmower.
So you start off with a bath (just wet or also shampoo?), then blow dry, then clip?
 
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