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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any recommendations for clippers to do basic groom on FFT? I've seen the Wahl Bravura and Arco discussed--those seem lighter weight than some of the others, and for weight in my hand, I prefer lighter and cordless. There's a big price difference between them, but I want to get what works. I have never done any grooming, so simple/ease of use is also a consideration. I will be taking the pup to a groomer for overall body groom, so this is for the in-between trims.

And, for the toenails, I think i'll prefer dremel over clippers, and again cordless. Please tell me what you use, if you like yours?

Thank you!
 

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What size is your dog ?

For a toy the Wahl Arco is perfect. I think the ones who have Spoos prefer the Bravura.

As for dremmel, buy a regular one, the one you use to work on wood. They’re more powerful and cost a fraction of what those for dogs will cost. Male sure it has many speeds, as you will need to use a lower one for nails.

I have a thread somewhere about dremmels, with the exact name and link to thr one I bought. If you search «*dremmel*» you should find it.

Found it : https://www.poodleforum.com/9-poodle-grooming/248250-dremel.html
 

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I have a minipoo currently and a tpoo in the past that I groomed. I have the bravura for face and sanitary trimming and a mini arco for the feet. If you have a minipoo or tpoo you will love the minibravura or miniarco for the feet.

The bravura and arco are similar.
 
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I am really old-fashioned - I have an Andis clipper with blades sized from a 5 to 40. I use 40 blades on face-feet-tail on a black dog who does not have sensitive skin. Dogs with sensitive skin would be done with a 30. For non-showing dogs I use a 7 blade on the body in summer and a 5 in winter. I use a 15 blade on the back of the tail, around the anus, on the belly, and inside the upper part of the back legs.

I also have an old Oster clipper but prefer the Andis. Be aware that blades are specific to clipper brands. My Oster blades look as if they would fit the Andis, but they don't.

The most critical thing about clipping is to constantly check the blade to be sure it's not getting hot. This is why I have 3-4 blades of each size that I use. If you cannot afford that many blades, you can just switch from the FFT blade to the body blade and work on part of the body while the FFT blade is cooling.

Also, only clip a clean dog - that protects the dog's skin and prolongs the life of the blades.

Blades should be brushed free of hair, wiped clean, and very lightly oiled after each use. If you live in a humid area you may need to wrap them in oiled paper when you put them away. I brush the hair out with "glue brushes" - they are available on Amazon as "acid glue brushes" and are $7-$8 for 3 dozen brushes. (I use those brushes for all kinds of things - cheap and handy!)

Finding someone to re-sharpen your blades can be tricky. Your best bet is to attend a dog show - people who sharpen scissors and blades often set up a booth at a show. I take all my scissors and blades to the first day of our show circuit to get them sharpened or else mail them to the guy who does them in our area. Ask people who show poodles about someone who does a good job on blades and scissors.


If you find someone at a dog show who has scissors for sale you can "try before you buy". Scissors are highly personal. I like ones that are fairly light weight and not too tight. Others like them heavier or tighter. Curved scissors are my favorites. Good scissors are expensive, unfortunately.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you all, what great information! My apologies, I should have said our pup will be a standard, so it sounds like the Bravura will work. I think to start I want to try the simplest possible option. At least I now understand that higher number means closer trim! :)

I will not be showing the dog, but I might be doing some sports. I don't know about sensitive skin yet, b/c I won't have the pup until later in the spring--i'm trying to gather all the supplies in advance.

Great tip on the dremel, Dechi! thank you for the thread link!
 

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I'm with Dechi as far as a Dremmel that you work on wood with. I have this one with variable speed and very powerful. I don't turn it to the highest with the poodles, but quite up there. It can burn if you're not careful...two or three swipes, then onto the next nail. I also have the flexible shaft accessory...very helpful. https://www.amazon.com/Dremel-395-3...0000302XV/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_pdt_img_top?ie=UTF8

With these tiny ones, their faces, ears etc are so close to their feet where you're working that it's very dangerous...scary. If they ever got their ear hair caught it would be just horrendous. With Matisse, he always stuck his head down close to see what was going on and it would block my view. I use to have him in a show coat and I took those pony tails and held his head up with my teeth...by the pony tails that were on the top of his head. Well...needless to say, that was ridiculous. So, I taught him to put his little chin on my chest and look heavenward. The cue is "head up." So he promptly plasters his head with his chin up right on my chest. It's gotten so I don't have to use the verbal cue too much, other than a reminder because the cue has become the act of dremeling. lol.

Maurice bit it when he was very young. Thank goodness it stopped the thing from spinning. I freaked...was shaking like crazy...thought he'd never go for it again. But it stopped and apparently didn't hurt him or scare him. The next time I tried, he was fine. But he has never shown an interest in what I'm doing since. And keeps his head back and out of the way on his own. So, the moral of this story is be sure your baby keeps his head out of the way because it could be dangerous.

I must add that I also bought a cordless Dremel to keep at someone else's house that I visited often and sometimes for long spells. I returned it because it didn't hold a charge well AT ALL. My advice is to stick with the corded one...it's a long, sturdy cord and it keeps the thing nice and powerful, which you want, as Dechi explained...too slow and the nail catches.

Good luck!
 
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I use the Mini Arco from Wahl for shaved places. (I have toys) You might do fine without if you have a big poodle. My main clipper is the Wahl Chromado lithium, which is very much like the Bravura...both great. You can compare the differences online. Here it is. Plus, get the clipper comb attachment set shown below. Metal is a must.

https://www.groomerschoice.com/Wahl-Chromado-Lithium/productinfo/WALICHR/
 
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I have a standard - I use the Oster A5 (I think the current model is the A6) for the body. For FFT I use an Arco SE. Lightweight and comes with 2 batteries so you can switch them out. I don't use a Dremel - I have the Andis nail grinder and found it much superior to a regular demel.
 

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I have the Andis nail grinder and found it much superior to a regular demel.
Asta's mom...could you tell us about the grinder? In what ways do you find it superior? I'd be interested...always like to make these jobs easier and safer.
 

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I've been using the Dremel from Amazon that Dechi recommended in her linked thread and it's been fabulous! Very idiot-proof! Same with the Wahl Bravura. It's all you need to put a dog in a pet clip. Very lightweight. I personally can't deal with anything corded or heavy. As Johanna said, just keep those blades cleaned and oiled, and always clip a clean dog and you'll do fine.
 
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I've been using the Dremel from Amazon that Dechi recommended in her linked thread and it's been fabulous! Very idiot-proof! Same with the Wahl Bravura. It's all you need to put a dog in a pet clip. Very lightweight. I personally can't deal with anything corded or heavy. As Johanna said, just keep those blades cleaned and oiled, and always clip a clean dog and you'll do fine.
I stopped using it myself. Merlin wouldn’t have it and I was afraid he would flip and bite me. I made the mistake of staying too long on one nail and it burnt a little. Beckie let me but since I had to take Merlin to the pet store to have it done, might as well bring her too.

Oh, and I tried to do her dewclaw but it caught the hair while spinning and I really freaked out. She stayed still though. So I couldn’t do her dewclaws after that, too much anxiety for me.

I kept it in case I decide to work on wood one day...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This is all so helpful! The dremel is starting to sound slightly terrifying--I'm imagining getting my hair caught, the pup's hair caught, pup wriggling away with smoldering toenails...

I can't find who mentioned it now, but on the Wahl clippers it sounds like it's important to get the extra metal combs rather than using the plastic combs that come in the box?

Thank you again for all the great info!
 

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Here's the Amazon page on the Andis grinder.

https://www.amazon.com/Andis-2-Spee...6&s=gateway&sprefix=andis+nail,aps,149&sr=8-6

I love that it has 2 different apertures at different angles - a flat and a conical one. - I use the flat side of the aperture as I have a standard. The
conical aperture may be good for a smaller size dog. It also has 2 speeds - I use the high with Asta and again the low speed might be better for a smaller dog.
The lithium battery lasts a long time before it needs to be charged. Charging is quick. Lightweight and cordless makes the nail grinding easier. I know there is another member of PF that has this grinder and loves it.
 

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I use the cordless dremel on Poppy. I put a snood on her to hold the ear hair back. In the beginning she was curious and would stick her head down to watch me dremel. After the first time she now sleeps through the dremel process. I used to quick her nails from time to time, when clipping them. No more of that.

Here are some helpful pictures. If the nails get too long just dremel them a little bit every 4 days and it pushes the quick back and soon the nails are short again.
 

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I have a Wahl bravura that is my go to trimmer. It is cordless which for me makes a big difference in just being able to maneuver. I started with an Andis AGC 2speed corded that now I rarely use. The biggest difference to me is the Andis blades can be swapped out and most anything is available. With the bravura you have to use the 5 in 1 blade. Not so terrible as you can add combs that will give you pretty much any length. I’m a home groomer and have built my arsenal of tools slowly over the years. At first cost was everything, then I started leaning toward quality. Its a difficult choice because what works for you may not for others. I hope this helps more than confuses.
My best to the group
 

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This is all so helpful! The dremel is starting to sound slightly terrifying--I'm imagining getting my hair caught, the pup's hair caught, pup wriggling away with smoldering toenails...

I can't find who mentioned it now, but on the Wahl clippers it sounds like it's important to get the extra metal combs rather than using the plastic combs that come in the box?

Thank you again for all the great info!
You just have to be thoughtful of what's going on. Tie your hair up or cut it off. LOL. I love the flexible shaft attachment...makes it much more maneuverable and keeps the actual motor part a little away so it's not as noisy, not that it's that loud. My dogs have become very relaxed doing this. It's hard to get at the little one's one back foot...the angle gets awkward. So they have learned to lean back on their backs against me and while Maurice is still a little awkward with that, Matisse relaxes completely...legs spread eagle and he almost goes to sleep and I can stretch his leg out a little so it's away a bit. So, with practice and lots of goodies, yours can get fine too so that it makes the job easier and rather a pleasant bonding experience. It's just one more thing where the dogs learn to put their trust in me. Sure, I'm made booboos here and there, gone too short. One thing, if it bleeds, it immediately cauterizes so then it doesn't bleed...much safer than clippers. They wince a little and then it's over and they're no more worse for wear. This only happened a few times. I don't hold the Dremel on a nail. I swipe, once, twice, three or four and then go onto the next, letting that one cool. Just keep your own hair, strings from sweatshirts, loose clothing out of the mix. If your dog has a hairy foot, you can put a nylon (panty hose...remember those?) lol...on their foot, poke the nails through and that will hold the hair back. I shave my dogs feet prior. I've gotten little tiny hairs on their feet if they weren't totally clean and it didn't bother them...not long enough to wrap around the thing.

If your dog is not use to it, it will take some conditioning...usually not too hard because it's more comfortable for them than clipping. If you need help with that, just ask.

I go straight across until the nail is as short as I want it. Then bevel it all around to get off the rough edges. I bevel quite a ways back and let the center part finish getting worn down on it's own on pavement...just naturally. The quick will recede. In theory, it's not a bad idea to do this a couple times a week and then you don't have to take much time at all and the dog continues to stay accustomed to it. It keeps the quick back so they can get nice and short. Of course, naturally, I procrastinate so they don't get done twice a week. LOL. More like when they get groomed...about once a month. But more would be better.

There use to be the best instructions...Doberdawn's Dremel instructions. But I can't find it anymore online. It says can't reach this page. So dang. She had pictures and good instructions.


Anyhow, good luck.
 

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Thanks Asta'smom. It is sure less expensive. I think I spent something like $95 on my Dremel. Of course, it came with loads of attachments and I can use it for all the wood working I do...(not. lol) a whole kit with a carrying case with a handle and everything. And I DO like the variable speed on my Dremel and that it has very high rpms which I have thought necessary. I'm glad the Andis works well for you. If anything ever happens to my Dremel, I might try the Andis. But I did try one something like that and found that it would catch...trip and that would drive them up the wall...uncomfortabe. Petipaws or some such thing. Maybe that's not as good as what you have though...maybe not as high rpms. Gotta love those rpms. :act-up:
 
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