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Mia, a 1 year old toy poodle and Chico, a 3 year old cockatiel
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I had experience with this too, in a way. The breeder I got Mia from was a rehoming because the old owner of Mia gave her back. Even my teachers reacted like “Why did you buy?” Like it was the worst decision I made. I have since gotten over that. There are no poodles for adoption in my country, none. Only occassional rehomings, but they’re very rare. I was lucky to come across Mia. I wanted a specific breed for my first dog so that I would know what to expect, also because someone who frequently visits my home has a mild case of allergy to non-hypoallergenic dogs. Mia is the best and I do not regret my decision. Don’t let people guilt-trip you.
 

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Grow up, please. Don’t let other people’s opinions define who you are or how you feel. Be strong with your convictions. You can thank your friends for sharing their perspective with you can kindly inform them that your priorities are different. Celebrate differences in opinion and that you have a wide circle of diverse friends.
 

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Ugh. I just have to get this off my chest: I am visiting my hometown this weekend, and over the last 2 days, I've seen 3 friends who have all sounded just so disappointed when I tell them we are planning to get our future dog from a breeder, as opposed to a shelter or rescue or pound. I have explained my reasoning to them, about wanting a puppy from health-tested parents from a responsible, ethical breeder, and how we are nervous about a rescue dog with an unknown background, largely because we have a baby under a year old at home, and live very rurally. We contacted and met with a Spoo breeder a few months ago, were impressed with her, her dogs, and her home where the pups are raised. A litter we are interested in was just born last week and will be ready to go home in January. (So I am very excited!!) Obviously adopting any dog is a huge responsibility and commitment, and going to a good breeder means there is a price tag to match, which we are willing to pay for a healthy dog from healthy parents who are treated well. But still my friends are like, "There are so many puppies and dogs who will be great family pets whom you can rescue," or "Three thousand dollars for a DOG? You're crazy!" Yes, I feel like I'm nuts for paying so much when there are so many free or cheap rescue dogs, BUT my gut tells me that now is not the time to rescue a dog with an unknown background. I should note that none of these friends have small children to worry about. And sure, if I didn't have children, my husband and I would absolutely want to adopt from a shelter. I researched shelter dogs for a couple months before we decided to go the breeder route -- every time we found a dog that looked like a good match, there was some issue: it was listed as not good with cats (we have a cat), or not good with kids, or not good with YOUNG kids, or couldn't be adopted out of state, or the rescue agency never got back to me, or the dog had already been adopted when I called! We live very rurally and the closest small city is 70 miles away, the closest major city is over 100 miles away. Not really conducive to looking at shelters to meet animals before we commit to taking a dog home. Anyway, I'm tired of always having to justify to my friends and family why we're going the breeder route as opposed to rescuing. Has anyone else had this experience too? Thanks for reading my rant.

i am a senior dog owner. Meaning I am the old one, not the dog....lol. There is a dog out there for everyone. Some people have the time and ability to work with rescue dogs, and that is wonderful. I have both rescued and breeder purchased in my life. And there are people out there that don’t want to be bothered with puppies, and that is o.k. too. Adult dogs are great, but they also need time to adjust to a new home. So, for anyone to express to anyone what type of pet they should or should not have shows you who they are as a person. It is YOUR choice what is best for you and your family, not theirs. I am glad you made the best choice for you.
 

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Where do all those only get a rescue people think the dogs they find come from? Some sort of breeding right...

Personally I never bother getting involved with people like that. I once had a guy in Lowes come up to talk to Lily and Javelin. He asked me what rescue I got them from and I said they were from 2 different responsible breeders. He sneared at me and walked away. Good riddance I say!

Family members adopted two Puerto Rican street dogs. These dogs are both emotional train wrecks and loaded with various health problems. I actually tend to think for some dogs like these euthanasia is a kindness. It also bothers me that these dogs came from off shore. Don't we have enough dogs in need of new homes here already?

Go ahead and call me a snobby grinch if you want but for all three of our dogs (we also have a GSD) we wanted to know they were healthy and had spent their first weeks with breeders who nurtured them to be even tempered and healthy. They have all been performance sport dogs.
You are spot on. I have seen every situation you described, don't even get me started on rescue dogs that, sadly, just need to be euthanized. Have a cousin with some of those dogs, they are a danger to every visitor due to unprovoked biting.

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My standard answer is "I am allergic to dogs, this is one of the few dogs I can have, are you saying I cannot have a dog?"
Honestly it's none of their business, not their choice, so don't try to justify it to them, do what is best for you and your family and find the best breeder and get your pup.
Exactly our situation. Severe allergies should not disqualify people from the joy of dogs. Not that you should have to justify your choices, but I have a zinger that leaves those judgemental snobs breathless. "We chose to open our home to more than 2 dozen teenagers in need of a loving family home over the span of 30 years. I think we've done our fair share of rescue"

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When I was younger it bothered me more, but quite frankly I’m too old to be guilt tripped.

My first childhood dog was a cocker spaniel schnauzer mix, Charlie. He was such a sweetheart. Then came Rusty, who we found in the classifieds free. A true mutt. His mom (who had just shown up at someone’s house in the country) was a nondescript brown dog. Rusty was a fun childhood dog also. Then I went to college were my boyfriend (now husband) adopted Emily, a “red-bone coonhound” from the shelter. There is no way she had any kind of hound in her whatsoever, but she was red, sooo. Then a year later Zoe, a JRT mix most likely, that showed up at a family friends work. Good hearted family friend took her in but didn’t have the dog-sense to handle a 6 month old JRT so I got her. Then Diego about 5 years later from the pound and Jack the year after that from a rescue. Diego’s results are below (I wish we’d been able to get them for the girls!), and Jack was a bull terrier.

So no. I don’t have any guilt about my purebred poodle puppy that I’ve always wanted. I refuse to let anybody make me feel bad for making what I believe is the best choice for my family. It’s not just adults in this house anymore, and I need to know what I’m getting into. There was a time I adopted from the shelter, as well as fostered litters of newborn puppies and kittens, and I’m positive there will be a time for it in the future, but that time is not now for us. Diego is still with us at 13.5, and is and always has been the most bomb proof dog ever. New pup Starla will fit perfectly into our family, which I know because I know what we can handle and what we can expect.
What a lovely story. We were homestay parents for 27 teens who needed a stable family over the span of 30 years. Rescue work can take many forms. I agree with your reasoning. Now, with a little grandson, I feel I deserve a non allergenic, sane and safe dog I can absolutely trust in all situations

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I was walking Annie, lovely, pure bred Annie, who most people said was the calmest, happiest, most confident puppy they had ever met (people often thought she was a 2 year old mini poodle). A woman stopped and admired and cooed over her, age maybe 5 months? "Oh, what a nice puppy, she is so lovely. So pretty, such a nice temprament" "Thanks, she is wonderful". "What rescue did you get her from?" "None. I got her from a great CKC breeder. "
She snatched back her hand, took a big step back, and her eyes widened. It was as if responsible dog breeder shopping was contagious, and a religious heresy. She stopped admiring my puppy. People are silly and the "Thou shalt RESCUE" preaching had gotten a bit out of hand.

First - how many purebred poodle puppies with great temperaments are in rescue in Canada? Well, you can go on a 2 + year waitlist with poodle rescue. But I would guess the answer is somewhere close to 2 per year in the entire country- most well bred poodles have a return to breeder contract, so don't end up in rescue. The dogs available are either generally old, have multiple difficult to manage health conditions, have aggression issues, or all of the above. Nicer dogs are usually rehomed to a friend or a family member long before they hit rescues. Yes, I am and will be prepared to deal with all those things if they arise with Annie, but I do believe in setting myself up for success. Many of the things I want to do with a dog (hiking, camping, dog sports, etc) are difficult to impossible with an old or sick dog, or a dog with aggression issues.

Second - I would have qualified for basically no shelter or rescue dogs, even if I wanted one. I lived in a rented apartment with no fenced yard and worked. 4 strikes against me there.

Third - I am picky. I needed to be. I wanted a pure bred poodle since I do have allergies and was in a small apartment, no way to keep the dog out of my bedroom. I needed a small dog and cat safe dog, good with travelling, trustworthy offleash.thats a lot of asks! Even if I wasn't picky, dog are in such high demand that the local humane society imported them from the US and overseas, and they never last long. Rescues are in high enough demand that the shelter/rescue can afford high criteria.

I am not saying I won't get a rescue in the future, most of our dogs growing up were what we called "second hand dogs" - no formal rescue, but rehomed with us to have a better life with a more suitable family. Most had some major quirks that needed working through, and would have been easier to deal with as a puppy. But the appearance of those dogs in your life can't be predicted, and for now, I wanted a dog that could do the things I wanted to do. If and when I get another "second hand dog" it will be at a very different time in my life when I can handle a young, poorly trained large breed working dog, who needs a lot more structure and a few thousand hours of training, which are the sort of rescues/rehomed that usually appeal to me.

For your guilting friends - they can get their own rescues. One of my best friends adopted, after great difficulty getting one (months of applying for every small breed that came into the humane society), a small, older mixed breed non shedding dog. He had major food aggression, was returned to the shelter multiple time for aggression, was prone to snapping, was overweight, could barely walk, etc. She has worked wonders with him, but ... He is still not a dog I would ever trust. Now, a few years later, she has a new baby. I expect the dog will end up at her parents house once the baby begins to crawl. It's not the sort of dog you could trust to put up with a child poking it at all, and I anticipate either the dog goes, or it snaps and bites and gets put down. Your kid comes first, and if I was in your situation, I would only consider a puppy from a good breeder, or a well vetted rehome from someone you know, not a rescue. Your kid comes first. Dogs are lovely, but it's not selfish to set yourself up to have the best chance NOT to have to rehome the dog, and NOT to have to put the dog down because it snaps and bites a baby. Doing otherwise, is, IMO, irresponsible dog ownership.
Wow, have had your exact experiences! Spent 2 years on a poodle rescue wait list. Was sneered at because we did not have a big fenced yard. Every dog offered had serious $$$ medical issues, aggressive temperament. Finally bought from an established breeder. Adore our Charlie

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I figure we have done our part with rescues: we have a Lab, a Chihuahua, and a border collie/whippet - all three are from the shelter. And then there is Zoe, the miniature poodle, the life of the party. She is from a well-known breeder (Betty Brown, Donnchada).

I am the treasurer and the breeder referral person for our local poodle club. I get phone calls and emails just about every day from people looking for a poodle in rescue. We have not had a poodle in rescue for several years - people just don't dump them off. The last time we had some rescue poodles is when a club member died unexpectedly and we had to help place her dogs.
 

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Ugh. I just have to get this off my chest: I am visiting my hometown this weekend, and over the last 2 days, I've seen 3 friends who have all sounded just so disappointed when I tell them we are planning to get our future dog from a breeder, as opposed to a shelter or rescue or pound. I have explained my reasoning to them, about wanting a puppy from health-tested parents from a responsible, ethical breeder, and how we are nervous about a rescue dog with an unknown background, largely because we have a baby under a year old at home, and live very rurally. We contacted and met with a Spoo breeder a few months ago, were impressed with her, her dogs, and her home where the pups are raised. A litter we are interested in was just born last week and will be ready to go home in January. (So I am very excited!!) Obviously adopting any dog is a huge responsibility and commitment, and going to a good breeder means there is a price tag to match, which we are willing to pay for a healthy dog from healthy parents who are treated well. But still my friends are like, "There are so many puppies and dogs who will be great family pets whom you can rescue," or "Three thousand dollars for a DOG? You're crazy!" Yes, I feel like I'm nuts for paying so much when there are so many free or cheap rescue dogs, BUT my gut tells me that now is not the time to rescue a dog with an unknown background. I should note that none of these friends have small children to worry about. And sure, if I didn't have children, my husband and I would absolutely want to adopt from a shelter. I researched shelter dogs for a couple months before we decided to go the breeder route -- every time we found a dog that looked like a good match, there was some issue: it was listed as not good with cats (we have a cat), or not good with kids, or not good with YOUNG kids, or couldn't be adopted out of state, or the rescue agency never got back to me, or the dog had already been adopted when I called! We live very rurally and the closest small city is 70 miles away, the closest major city is over 100 miles away. Not really conducive to looking at shelters to meet animals before we commit to taking a dog home. Anyway, I'm tired of always having to justify to my friends and family why we're going the breeder route as opposed to rescuing. Has anyone else had this experience too? Thanks for reading my rant.
It is great if you want to adopt a rescue, BUT you have a right to your own feelings and reasons for getting a pure-bred dog from a reputable breeder. Those people who get mad at you for not doing the "correct thing" would not understand a fact if it hit them in the face. All of your reasons, though you should not have to prove those to anyone else, are spot on anyway. Good luck.
 

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A nice sounding woman called my club today to ask about training for an adolescent golden doodle adopted from from a town (public) shelter. We talked for a few minutes during which it came to light that this dog resource guards the person I was talking to against other dogs and there are many dogs in the extended family. The dog is only about 8-9 months old. I told her this was a dangerous problem (she already understood that). I recommended that her first work should be with a behaviorist and gave her the name of one person I really like as well as the CCPDT website and noted she wanted a CBCC-KA not a CPDT-KA. I also told her to make sure she connected with someone today!

I guess my reply could be here or in the current doodle conversation.
 

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A nice sounding woman called my club today to ask about training for an adolescent golden doodle adopted from from a town (public) shelter. We talked for a few minutes during which it came to light that this dog resource guards the person I was talking to against other dogs and there are many dogs in the extended family. The dog is only about 8-9 months old. I told her this was a dangerous problem (she already understood that). I recommended that her first work should be with a behaviorist and gave her the name of one person I really like as well as the CCPDT website and noted she wanted a CBCC-KA not a CPDT-KA. I also told her to make sure she connected with someone today!

I guess my reply could be here or in the current doodle conversation.
That lady is lucky she was able to get help from you. A potentially dangerous situation

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A nice sounding woman called my club today to ask about training for an adolescent golden doodle adopted from from a town (public) shelter. We talked for a few minutes during which it came to light that this dog resource guards the person I was talking to against other dogs and there are many dogs in the extended family. The dog is only about 8-9 months old. I told her this was a dangerous problem (she already understood that). I recommended that her first work should be with a behaviorist and gave her the name of one person I really like as well as the CCPDT website and noted she wanted a CBCC-KA not a CPDT-KA. I also told her to make sure she connected with someone today!

I guess my reply could be here or in the current doodle conversation.
That lady is lucky she was able to get in touch

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I also believe, it’s fair to say you tried but couldn’t find the perfect fit for your family from any local shelters. I volunteered at a private, no kill shelter for over a year and was not tempted by any of our residents. I looked at what was available from the public and private shelters when my last Scottie passed. They had pit bulls, pit bull crosses, and a lot of sad Chihuahuas/ crosses. I didn’t know about breed rescues at the time, but after my friend’s experience with Golden’s, hard pass.
 

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I didn’t know about breed rescues at the time, but after my friend’s experience with Golden’s, hard pass.
Mfst, do you mind my asking what kind of trouble your friends had with a golden retriever? I was under the impression they were fabulous dogs, despite some health issues.
 

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They are fabulous, well bred, in their prime. My friend had to have a GR and took whatever the rescue had available. That meant they were older and she had to deal with very expensive health issues within a year or two. She was adamant that she wanted an older dog, not a puppy. She brought each and everyone of those Golden’s into peak condition, paid enormous vet bills along the way, and then they eventually had to be euthanized. I think it was unfair that she never got a younger adult GR from the rescue. I’m glad Waldo and all the others had a great last chapter, but it was emotionally and medically very costly. From her experience, I wouldn’t take an older poodle from a poodle rescue. She was lucky none of them had behavioral issues at least.
 

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Yep, Goldens are marvellous when well-bred. The ones around here are neurotic messes. It's heartbreaking.

I watched a young one try to climb out of the dog park in terror. None of the other dogs were even going near him. He finally managed to hide under a picnic table.
 

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Good to know, Mfmst and PtP, thanks for the input. My sister was interested in a GR so I've been doing some research into them out of curiosity.
 

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Yep, Goldens are marvellous when well-bred. The ones around here are neurotic messes. It's heartbreaking.

I watched a young one try to climb out of the dog park in terror. None of the other dogs were even going near him. He finally managed to hide under a picnic table.
I have a friend with a goldendoodle which has killed two sheep which got into their yard (they're next to a farm). He's also nearly killed a cat. It's all terror-aggression according to her; he's afraid of everything. I have never in all my days heard of a poodle tearing out the throat of livestock, so I'm guessing it's the retriever in him..?!
 

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I have never in all my days heard of a poodle tearing out the throat of livestock, so I'm guessing it's the retriever in him..?!
Wow, that's crazy. Incidentally I've had two retriever mixes ("oops litters" picked up from farms) and they both had aggression issues...

My next dog will be a well-bred, pure-bred poodle from an excellent breeder.
 

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I have never in all my days heard of a poodle tearing out the throat of livestock, so I'm guessing it's the retriever in him..?!
Or it’s just a nasty mix of genetics or an unstable dog because golden retrievers are not known to do that either. In fact, it’s the opposite. Have you ever heard of the famous soft golden mouth? They were bred to retrieve birds without damaging the goods. Definitely not dogs that (when stable) harm livestock.
 
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