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Don't take too much concern out of prerequisites or names of classes there are no universal squences or requirements. that must be done to be able to train for rally. A lot of training for it can be done "at home" especially if you use the app and the video links to learn the signs. Remember that when you read descriptions of what is to be done what is bolded is the essentials part of the sign. You can also think of each sign as being like a trick. You can teach each trick in isolation. Then you can string them all together to start to show the dog that they can't break off from the game after single tricks.Remember that rally is supposed to be fun and demonstrate team effort.
 

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In lower New York, northern New Jersey, Connecticut and Rhode Island the two big rally venues are AKC and to a lesser extent WCRL. I don't look much at other venues so I don't think there are lots of events in our neck of the woods. The other thing is that there are so many AKC events you don't need lots of venues to stay busy. I make enough stupid mistakes with only one set of signs that I don't do anything other than AKC rally. Tom just have fun getting started. Be aware there are diferent venues and you can pay attention to them or not depending on how big the bug for doing it bites you.
 

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Yes, you will likely learn AKC version of signs. Have fun with it and I am sure you will learn nice sign/trick combos that will be fun and that will encourage connectedness and those are the two most important outcomes.
 
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Tom that sounds like quite an adventure! You did great supporting Elroy for doing signs that take some work to teach. One thing I noticed was your issue with having Elroy circle around you. This is a bit of a challenge for many teams. I suggest having a treat in both hands and starting Elroy to going around with your right hand and once he is behind you use your left hand behind your back to keep him going in the right direction. During the time you are doing this on leash it will also help you to make a smooth transition with your leash. You will find many of these moves are easier once you are able to get rid of the leash. Stick with it and I am sure you will find rally to be lots of fun and a great way to build your relationship deeper than you can imagine possible.
 

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Danette Chorney? She is one of my favorite judges. We've shown to her a number of times and we are friends on FB. You will learn lots from her, not just about teaching the signs, but how to navigate courses.
 
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I would only pay for a sit at heel when Elroy keeps his front feet on the board. To help make that happen you can use a mild aversive by pulling up on his collar using his leash (I would not do this off leash until he is showing that he understands what is supposed to happen). With that bit of upward pressure to keep his feet on the board you can lure him to look up with a cookie above his head held along the seam of your pants. Another way you can work on this is to sit him between you and a wall. You will kneel next to him facing him and the wall. Hold your leash and a cookie in your right hand and use your cookie to direct his head up. This will also tend to move him towards sitting. Use your left hand to guide him to the sit while he tuacks and keeps his feet on the board. Once he has built some sucle memory you should see him tuck more readily. You may want to assign a new order to the tuck sit as separate from a casual sit. I use "come up." Another thing to be careful with is to not encourage inadvertent forging. Make sure the cookie always come from your hand right above his head and along your pants seam, not in front of you.
 

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Oh my words don't convey what pictures can. Elroy will be parallel to the wall and once you kneel next to him you should be looking at him and then the wall so that your chest and abdomen are facing his side. Keep his feet on the board. Hope that says it better.
 
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Thaat's brave playing with the flirt pole in the house! We would have insanity and massive destruction of property if we showed the flirt pole in the house. I am glad see see that the tuck sit is starting to catch on.
 

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Remember there are two eager flirt pole players here though so definitely more hazards possible. My mom hates being out in the cold too. She is retreating to Florida on Feb 6th for a month. I wish she wasn't going because of COVID, but she is her own person and in charge of her daily doings. Besides she wants to see my brother and his new house. Are you all ready for the snow?
 
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We are in Huntington so north shore western Suffolk county. I think we may get more than you but who knows. Poodles wll be happy to have enough to make it playful. I am bummed because I was planning to take Javelin to a nice training place off NJ Tpke exit 7, too far to go if the weather is on the bas side of the forecast.
 

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Your 2 second rule regarding staring is excellent. Staring is one of the most surefire way for dogs to get in trouble.

It is really wonderful that Danette is teaching all levels of signs. Javelin knows almost all signs from all rally levels too. If you decide to trial you will find yourself flying through the titles so it is good to have master signs mastered early on.
 
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I had a feeling the staring avoidance rule probably came from your focus class. I spend a lot of time in my focus class and novice classes making sure that nobody is allowed to develop staring habits. The other day I was talking to my novice folks so I had them put their dogs on down stays. Of the four of them only one was really relaxed and off duty on the down. He had his head down and his eyes closed. I asked the other people if they thought their dogs were relaxed. One of them said no because she could see her dog was scanning the room IBelgian Shepherd, so the herding dog thing) The other two said they thought their dogs were relaxed since they were on downs. I said I didn't think either of those dogs was really relaxed and to show them why they weren't I took just a few steps towards one of them and he broke his down because he was watching me and I was moving towards him a little bit. For the other one (a very green dog) all I had to do was point at her to call out to the handler that she was trying very hard to engage the really relaxed dog when she jumped up and took steps towards him. Thankfully I only had those four people and they were well spread out. It is very worthwile to learn to read canine body language. Seeing intention signals before they turn into full blown behaviors is a great skill for all of us.
 

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Lily has never loved that call front with the side steps. We muddle along with it, but Javelin is getting the hang of it. And I see lots of people who stop on their way around the dogs for the satnd sit and down while handler keeps moving. Lily is awesome on those three. I taught those by playing at noodley heeling with random sit, stand or down while i kept moving and then turned it into me going around her. I just started working on that set of behaviors with Javelin yesterday. I am glad you are having fun with this Tom. If nothing else you can do AKC trick dog titles and CGC but I think you would have fun showing it too.

Tell Danette hello right back when you see her for your next session. I know she is watching us on FB, but let her know we only need 11 master points to finish. We have 3 trials in March so hopefully we will finish next month. After that we will be at a poodles only trial in April. I wish we were going to show to Danette for one of those.
 

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It is essentially the same here. Rally obedience and classical obedience events are separate trials with separate event numbers. Some people just call rally rally, but it is a sport that has origins in obedience and is thought of by many people as a stepping stone to get into classical obedience and by others as something to do with a dog that has finished its obedience career but still likes to do stuff. Since rally jumps are lower than obedience jumps it works well for many older dogs.
 

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Ha I always spin slower than Lily. I tell her wait when she is done so that she doesn't do anythng strange to take points off. I hear you on "waiting" for having a dog. I didn't wait to retire. I waited to have a nice dog friendly yard.

You know Danette and her boy are going to Rally Nationals. They made it through the draw. I am happy for them.
 
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