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How often should a toy poodle's teeth be brushed?

Also assuming this is night time, is it important to take away all food after brushing the dog's teeth. I don't eat after brushing since I'm going to go to sleep and wondering if this also applies to toy poodles.
 

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I do it every second day, but every day would be even better. That’s just what I found to motivate me not to quit. I like to do it just before bedtime, so they don’t eat afterwards and don’t have food decomposing in their mouths while they sleep. I figure it helps having less tartar build-up.
 

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I brush daily in the morning, after the dogs have had their breakfast. Night time might be even more effective, but mornings work better for our routine.
 

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Dogs are less prone to cavities than humans - their biggest problem is gum disease from the build up of tartar. It is particularly a problem for toy breeds as they have the same number of teeth in a much smaller muzzle. Poppy has never needed a veterinary dental; Sophy, who is more prone to tartar build up, has had two in 12 years. The second time the vet warned me that she would probably need several teeth extracted, but once the gunk was removed he found teeth and gums all in good shape, which he put down to the regular brushing and a good diet. So don't give up brushing even if the teeth show signs of tartar!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Dogs are less prone to cavities than humans - their biggest problem is gum disease from the build up of tartar. It is particularly a problem for toy breeds as they have the same number of teeth in a much smaller muzzle. Poppy has never needed a veterinary dental; Sophy, who is more prone to tartar build up, has had two in 12 years. The second time the vet warned me that she would probably need several teeth extracted, but once the gunk was removed he found teeth and gums all in good shape, which he put down to the regular brushing and a good diet. So don't give up brushing even if the teeth show signs of tartar!
It's good to know that morning brushing works as well!
 

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I feed my puppy raw so bones help clean his baby teeth. He doesn’t have bad breath. Let’s see when he gets his adult teeth.
 

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Small dogs should probably be brushed daily.

A raw bone daily is just as good.
 

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I found this, Im not sure how to navigate it?? seems promising, though [PDF] Raw beef bones as chewing items to reduce dental calculus in Beagle dogs. | Semantic Scholar


I know I've read of things, and heard from vets the benefit of raw meaty bones, Its easier than tooth brushing for one, and the dog is better at getting at the very back of the mouth and gums. I don't know about you, but I struggle to brush my dogs teeth for 2 mins, my dog will chew on a bone for 40 mins and I am pretty sure that has to be more beneficial
 
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.... I don't know about you, but I struggle to brush my dogs teeth for 2 mins, my dog will chew on a bone for 40 mins and I am pretty sure that has to be more beneficial
Lol same, I get maybe 2-3 swipes with the tooth brush on each quadrant before calling it good.
 

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It took many months but even Sophy accepts around 30 strokes on each quadrant now - the trick is the lick of toothpaste that rewards good dogs. Mine have never been great chewers, and rather too prone to protect good bones from each other and from the cats, plus Poppy's health issues mean I avoid raw for her these days. Brushing is actually easier for us, now that it is built into the early morning routine.
 
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