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Hello
I have mentioned this before, but as a poodle rescuer, having a foster dog come into our home is LIKE having a puppy. Nearly every time a needy foster dog arrives, I think 'what have I done? Can I rehabilitate this dog?" I have no idea what the personality is going to be. Will he/she play? Is he/she aggressive, especially on groom table? How much effort is it going to be to potty train this dog? Is he/she going to eat? Kennel training, here we go again! Sleepless nights (just a few), spay/neuter surgery risks, compatibility to our dogs, Leash training...

I can honestly say we have fostered over 40 dogs and all were wonderful house pets when it was their time to go to permanent homes. All kennel trained, leash trained, properly fed (pounds gained, pounds lost), on a strict schedule, accustomed to grooming and socialized. This comes at a complete loss of sleep, time invested and hours of rehabilitation. They were all worth it, every one.

How did we make it through over 40 times? The families who graciously went thru the adoption process, who came out on the other side smiling, the first meeting of their new pet. The photographs I took of that very first introduction, THAT is what keeps me going.

PS. TO those of you who have adopted a rescue dog, PLEASE keep your foster/rescue apprised of your new pet. A short email, a photo, an update means so much to us who loved your pet first! It's those words of a dog's new life that really keep rescue going. It means a LOT to us.
The time and trouble you invest in gathering those fosters from shelters or wherever and spend getting them over their health problems is a lot, but wow, it would pale in comparison to the time and trouble you must face housebreaking them and teaching them basic indoor manners. I admire it so much. Housebreaking puppies is my least favorite task, but housebreaking an adult dog would be so much more frustrating because their needs are less predictable and they aren't as eager to please as puppies. And to teach them to mind manners and soothe them into showing personality to make them good pets...MUCH harder than those undamaged puppies.
 

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I was looking at my kitchen island today and noticed that there is a line of objects out of Poodle snout, Poodle paw reach. There is no margin of error with Buck. The one time the toilet lid is up (slurp) or the one time the trash lid isn't completely secure... If you are a pushover, he will not only push you over, he may run over you! He is smart and stubborn, high energy and exuberant. Everybody has to be consistent and firm or reap the whirlwind. So it's been wild. A lot.

I see the promise in this dog and I am not going to let him down. The first thing I realized was that I needed help training him. I had no experience with this caliber of dog. While some of you have MPS, my fantasy is to have all of our best PF trainers work with Buck. I found a good trainer and do the best I can in between. Potty training was a breeze and it also helps to be good-looking or I might have posted a "so disappointed" or an "at wit's end" thread. I celebrate my small successes and take the long view. I will have a future perfect Poodle but it doesn't magically happen.
 

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I see a pattern emerging - the more experience you have with animals in general and puppies in particular, and the more inclined you are to go with the flow and not be perfectly in control, the easier the ride! Not surprising really...

Poodlefoster, there must be dogs and families everywhere blessing your name daily, and some families perhaps who do not quite realise how much they owe to you, and other people like you.
 

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Our new spoo puppy is almost 13-weeks. We have had her for 2.5 weeks. Like most folks, we forgot how much work it is ! Outside every hour, 3 feedings and lots of play to tire her out.

Her 8 year old big sister helps out alot. They play with toys non-stop, and wrestle. We are most happy that our older spoo is taken with the puppy.

No accidents in the crate, and sleeps all night without having to go out. We have designated areas in 3 rooms that have been puppy proofed with tarps, where we tether her in with us. Accidents are getting fewer, but with all the playing going on, sometimes even going out every hour is not enough.

She is eating alot now. Bag says 1.5-2 cups daily, and most days she goes 2-3 cups. We have never had an overweight spoo, and have always free fed our adults, so I am sure the new puppy will self regulate soon.

Can't wait until fully house trained though.
 

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I have raised multiple dogs (and children). I never for a second wanted any of them gone. But at times I wished for a clone of myself to come take care of them!

We brought Chagall home as a nine week old pup eight days after our 16 year old terrier was PTS. We were used to living with an adult dog, which is a world apart from living with a puppy! I remember having talks with myself.

"You brought this little furball into your life. You want a dog. Life is better with a dog. The best way for you to get the dog you want is to raise a puppy to be it. One day he will be old. And one day he will be gone. Breathe deep and enjoy the ride."

As puppies go Chagall was easy enough, except for his surprising land shark prowess. He didn't destroy or chew things that weren't his (or soon became his, like toilet paper rolls). But his needle sharp puppy teeth on my ageing skin was a not a fun thing. Leash training tried both our resolve. In retrospect, my expectations early on were grossly unfair. I wanted him out prancing nicely alongside me far too quickly, not appreciating how his puppy curiosity would cause him to break stride and bop around.

I had the luxury of raising puppy Chagall while being retired, that made things altogether much easier. I'm one who wakes up easily and early, so the 'round o'clock housebreaking outings weren't that big a deal. (Though scurrying outside in the early morning to let him go first, before me, as I stood there with my knees pressed together wasn't always the height of pleasant.) I went back to work part-time when Chagall was 9 months old (got an offer I couldn't refuse). I only needed to be away from him for four hours at a time a few days a week. But I pined for him! I resumed full retirement when he turned two.

I readily admit having to adjust my schedule around his puppy needs wasn't all rainbows and roses. There were times when I didn't much feel like it but knew I had to stop whatever I was doing or get back home to attend to his needs. But that's part of the lifelong commitment you make to a dog and I knew it going in.

I do feel badly for those who buy into the Disney-like fantasy of the perfect-from-the get-go puppy who is house trained in 24 hours, learns how to sit/down/give paw/go to mat/fetch/walk on leash/do tricks/play the piano and embroider within hours. (And never, ever throws up on the carpet!) That sort of hype can really inflate a novice puppy owner's notion of what to expect. Real love takes effort! Poodle puppies are little bundles of pure love with four a paws and a tail. And they are so worth the effort!

To all those currently "raising baby," hang in there! You'll be so glad you did.
 

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I will admit that Silvie was an extremely easy puppy. One of the best I have ever had. Vidia was hell to house train. I swear little dogs are much harder to house train than big dogs. With all this being said we are bring home a new puppy Dec. 27th and then another in the spring of 2016. We are excited for this. ask me again next summer... I may or may not be too exhausted to respond LMBO! :)
 

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I think this is a great thread. It's good to dispel the myth of the completely easy puppy. I know some puppies are easier than others and my Chloe (youngest) was easy compared to Theo (oldest) but there still were days with Chloe when I felt trapped in the kitchen. (because it's where she could have accidents without staining a carpet and i stayed there with her so she wouldn't be alone and I was tired of watching her.) They were so cute though, and they were so joyful and funny, I would raise a puppy again without a second thought.

They did need constant watching for months to intercept poops and pees and chewing things. I was a good watcher, so they only had about one accident a week after the first few weeks, but they would've had more had I not been intercepting. At 5 months I could trust them completely not to pee or poop in the house.

I think they cried at night in their crate next to my bed for a part of the night for the first few weeks. I was home from work for the summer when I got them at 8 weeks til they were about 4 months, b/c I work at a school, so I didn't have to crate them during the day too much when they were young. When they were 4-5 months, I crated them while I was at work, and that helped them get used to the crate too.

Theo was an alligator (or shark) until he was 5 months. It was very upsetting. He wouldn't let me touch him without him biting me. I did everything they said to do; yell ouch, squeal, turn my back to him, stop playing, say no. The only thing that worked was to put a toy in his mouth. He might still decide to bite me anyway. This stopped at 5 months. Chloe did not bite at all-what a dream girl! Well, she bit Theo, ha, ha- payback for him. He didn't mind her biting him. He was about 1.2 years old when she came to us.

Theo also never slept during the day and had high energy. Chloe slept like a puppy is supposed to and she goes to bed at 8:30 every night.

Things that saved us were: long, long walks where they could say hi to neighborhood dogs, training sessions, teaching them things, bully sticks and most importantly, our play dates with other pups their age and a big fenced in backyard.
 

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I am sure I will kick myself for this later, but I WANT a rotten little puppy! I want a naughty, loud, destructive monster! I want to be up all night, I want to be outside every hour! I want my cats to think I've lost my mind!

If it means having a puppy, then I want it.
 

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I see a pattern emerging - the more experience you have with animals in general and puppies in particular, and the more inclined you are to go with the flow and not be perfectly in control, the easier the ride! Not surprising really...



Yep, I think you hit the puppy nail right on the head, lol!
 

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I think it makes a HUGE difference in the breeds you had before you got your first Poodle. There can be a real culture shock when you have had dogs that were lower energy and not the sharpest knives in the drawer. I joke that I'm training a lawyer! Buck is going to find the loophole, the weak link and exploit it, if he can. When folks join PF and say they have always had Poodles or wanted a new breed after dealing with GSD's, BC's shedding issues, I always think they have the chops and will be delighted. Not that one's first experience with a Poodle would be bad whatsoever, but if you go into it with the 'yeah,yeah, I know what I'm doing' and you've only ever had a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, let's say, then you are in for a ride:) Or Scotties as in my case. The point is that Poodles are a higher order of dog, and you have to bring game. "So Disappointed " "Not What I Expected", could be more about you than the dog.
 

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I think it makes a HUGE difference in the breeds you had before you got your first Poodle. There can be a real culture shock when you have had dogs that were lower energy and not the sharpest knives in the drawer. I joke that I'm training a lawyer! Buck is going to find the loophole, the weak link and exploit it, if he can. When folks join PF and say they have always had Poodles or wanted a new breed after dealing with GSD's, BC's shedding issues, I always think they have the chops and will be delighted. Not that one's first experience with a Poodle would be bad whatsoever, but if you go into it with the 'yeah,yeah, I know what I'm doing' and you've only ever had a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, let's say, then you are in for a ride:) Or Scotties as in my case. The point is that Poodles are a higher order of dog, and you have to bring game. "So Disappointed " "Not What I Expected", could be more about you than the dog.

Overall, I agree with that. That's a more realistic view of things.

With me, I never had a dog of my own until I got married, and our Poodle, Tinker, was our first ( and Poodles has been the only breed since). The only dog who was in my life when I was growing up was a cocker spaniel named Lady, and she passed away when she was 12, and I was 11.

I do think a lot of it has to do with the general personality of the owners. I never went into Poodle ownership as thinking I knew what I was doing, but I did go into it with the "oh well" kind of attitude when things went wrong. I do remember checking out a lot of books at the library, reading up on how to take care of Poodles, but the overall day to day life was just a learn as we go type of thing. I honestly don't remember ever wanting to pull my hair out or thinking that it was not what I expected. My husband and I chose not to have children, but my family always said that we should have had kids because of the way I deal with stress and everyday life. I just seem to have that 'go with the flow' kind of attitude. At least it helps keep the blood pressure down, lol.
 

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I am sure I will kick myself for this later, but I WANT a rotten little puppy! I want a naughty, loud, destructive monster! I want to be up all night, I want to be outside every hour! I want my cats to think I've lost my mind!

If it means having a puppy, then I want it.
I am bookmarking this, so that I can remind you when the time comes! But you are certainly going into puppy owning knowing what to expect!
 

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I'm a first time mom of puppies... And they're litter mates! I have an older dog which was raised by my husband as a puppy, and he's such a fine dog. I thought having more of him would be a great idea. I still do, but I didn't know how demanding it would be.

The first time I saw Phoenix and Copper, I fell in love. They were fluffy, with cute little wagging tails, teddy-bearish features, playful, and inquisitive. My husband and I had a hard time choosing between the two, so we got them both. My "What did I get myself into?" moment happened the night they came home, when I read about the horrors of Littermate Syndrome on the Internet. But my husband and I are committed. Hence, while I cry of exhaustion at least once a week, has significantly decreased my gaming with my husband, and had a lot less sexy time with him, I find comfort in the fact that this is temporary.

What keeps me going? They are cute. Sounds shallow, but I find myself basking in delight everyday in the many little things that they do (or don't, like the rare days with no potty accidents). Part of it, I think is because I like kids a lot. And maybe, I find that these puppies are kinda like kids too. Or maybe, I just really love them. I don't really know. I only feel.

Anyhow, I've had them for 6weeks now and they seem to be doing ok, except for some potty training accidents. But, who knows what the future will bring? I take things one day at a time, and hope that I can make it through.

And yes, reading about people's experiences with puppies and knowing that there's help from this forum makes me hopeful.
 

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I'm a first time mom of puppies... And they're litter mates! I have an older dog which was raised by my husband as a puppy, and he's such a fine dog. I thought having more of him would be a great idea. I still do, but I didn't know how demanding it would be.

The first time I saw Phoenix and Copper, I fell in love. They were fluffy, with cute little wagging tails, teddy-bearish features, playful, and inquisitive. My husband and I had a hard time choosing between the two, so we got them both. My "What did I get myself into?" moment happened the night they came home, when I read about the horrors of Littermate Syndrome on the Internet. But my husband and I are committed. Hence, while I cry of exhaustion at least once a week, has significantly decreased my gaming with my husband, and had a lot less sexy time with him, I find comfort in the fact that this is temporary.

What keeps me going? They are cute. Sounds shallow, but I find myself basking in delight everyday in the many little things that they do (or don't, like the rare days with no potty accidents). Part of it, I think is because I like kids a lot. And maybe, I find that these puppies are kinda like kids too. Or maybe, I just really love them. I don't really know. I only feel.

Anyhow, I've had them for 6weeks now and they seem to be doing ok, except for some potty training accidents. But, who knows what the future will bring? I take things one day at a time, and hope that I can make it through.

And yes, reading about people's experiences with puppies and knowing that there's help from this forum makes me hopeful.
You'll be fine. They'll be fine. Don't worry. Just be prepared to be busy for a year or so. Everything will work out fine if you are caring, which, you are or you would't be here. It's a little bit of a chore but you can do it just fine. Read my pm's.
 

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You'll be fine. They'll be fine. Don't worry. Just be prepared to be busy for a year or so. Everything will work out fine if you are caring, which, you are or you would't be here. It's a little bit of a chore but you can do it just fine. Read my pm's.
Thanks again. You guys make this world a little better to live in. Sincerely. :)
 

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What a great thread, fjm, thank you!

Dulcie was a fairly easy puppy in many respects - she did house train with astonishing speed, adjusted to her crate within a couple of days, had no health issues and was a little star at puppy obedience (in between being a little terror at puppy obedience class lol).

The issues I had been concerned about before I got her (would I be able to house train her effectively? Would she be able to learn her manners with my inexpert training?) turned out to be non issues.

HOWEVER, LAND SHARK AHOY! Oh my oh my, those puppy teeth! And playful! And trying to walk without her lunging on her leash to get to other dogs to play play play!!!!!!

That went on for a few months and I despaired of ever training her out of it!

As others have said, having resources to consult (like PF here and also training classes) is the answer - and a clear -eyed commitment to ongoing, every day training. I learned that it is true that training doesn't have tot make hours every day - but several brief training sessions daily to work on specific behaviors and ongoing, consistent messages all day long are so important. And yes there were days when I got so frustrated - when all my efforts seemed to be making not the slightest dent in her behavior.

Then, inevitably a corner is turned and one unwanted behavior after another begins to disappear - while one wanted behavior after another begins to pop up regularly. YAY!

Dulcie keeps me humble. Just as I am patting myself on the back and smiling smugly about how good my girl is --- she will walk into the sitting room with a loaf of bread in her mouth that I had left cooling on a rack - and BAM, I now have a counter surfer at 18 months. :(

Yes, it is a challenge and it is hard and it is beautiful and fun and crazy and I wouldn't trade it for the world. Dulcie is my heart dog and I am thankful every day that I have her in my life. When she sighs in her crate at night as I turn off the light, I smile and am glad as always that she and I are on this journey together!
 

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nifty I can't believe I forgot to put counter surfing on my list of things I mis handled with Lily. I started putting booby traps on the counter the first time I saw Javelin look up at all. He seems to be keeping his nose out of harm's way.
 

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Catherine, I don't even know if there IS a way to handle counter surfing so it doesn't develop. I read all the threads back when DUlcie was young and I did everything advised, because I really did not want her to get the idea or be reinforced even ONCE for surfing -- I haven't had food on the counters for over a year! About a month ago, I made the mistake of briefly leaving steaks unattended on the kitchen counter. Dulcie did not get at them, but she was staring up at the counter where they were with a lot of interest! I congratulated myself that she really WAS trained not to counter surf! Go me!

And then after her illness last week, I had the bread on the counter after getting a new bread machine and in she trotted with the loaf in her mouth. You could have scraped my jaw off the floor. So much for the non-surfing Dulcie! At 18 months, she is a late-bloomer I guess!
 

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Poodle Pogo shark with attitude

Attitude, I was once a professional trainer of both horses and working dogs. Working dogs are the easiest for house training. They aren't. I trained GSDs for police work, Sight Hounds for hunting and horsed for police work and eventing. The worst horses were Shetland ponies for children (more important to train the child than the horse) I inherited a large mini poodle from my mom when she took her own life. The dog had not eaten for 2 weeks and was in bad shape. I called at my sisters place and the dog rose walked to me wagged her tail and lay on my feet. I think she adopted me. She was a constant and uncomplaining companion for another 8 years. I never had one issue with her. After I retired in 1996 I traveled, remarried and Had 17 years of dog free time. (missed them) When I decided to have a dog I remembered the one standard poodle we had in the police force. She would calm the felons. "Call that a police dog" dog shows teeth and growled bloodcurdlingly. "Well I guess she means business." Dog leads felon to the truck while felon pats dog and says "can I ride with her in the truck?"
I arranged a standard poodle from a breeder famous for hunting retrievers. Visits to puppy showed her to be high energy but calm with children. Enter Poodle pogo shark with attitude. Had I not had all the previous experience I could not have coped, period. She was the most demanding and most intelligent dog I have trained. House training, she trained me (at all hours) Chewing, she chewed me, my wife and everything I gave her. She never chewed anything she did not regard as hers. From the time she awoke to the times she slept (Oh heaven!) she would jump like a demented pogo stick with a shark on it. Attitude!! She would submit to my demands with stink eye. She wanted to be my wife's superior and would even take her place in her bed (not wanted) It was a strain to teach my wife to master her.
Today she is a loving, cuddling, obedient, careful, much loved by all, and easy to live with dog, that adapts to ANYTHING.
Excellent thread. I had contemplated something like it with all the new guys on the block. But FJM has done better than I could have.
Eric.:amen:
 
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