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Molly sounds pretty normal to me too! I hear you on the mouthiness as being annoying since Javelin still can be pretty teeth on (vs. hands on) sometimes, but never with malicious intent. I agree with fjm about upping her exercise, but urge you to make as much of it mental exercise as possible. The working brain is a huge consumer of energy, so working her brain will make her more tired than just running around. The other spectacular outcome of brain work is that nearly all of of does really tremendous relationship building which leads to better attention to you which helps the dog develop impulse control which leads to telling dog to stop using teeth actually working.
 

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I am no poodle pro - we just got our first spoo pup this year. Shae is about 5 mos and is a little bit behind your girl on a few things, so I would say you are on track and Molly is normal.

Ditto what fjm and lily cd re say; make sure she is well brain-exercised. On our busier days when we don't have the usual time to do a lot of training, Shae is much more rambunctious, bark-y, pesky and is a bigger thief. I try to work at least two 1/2 hour dedicated to training only session (am and pm using her meal) into our day and add outside play, fetch, etc. on top.
 

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You guys are awesome! Molly had her trainer here this afternoon just after I posted to this thread. When we told him how she was doing, the first suggestion he had was additional mental stimulation! Guess great minds think alike! He gave us some suggestions for activities along with additional guidance on some of the other issues we were having. He keeps telling us how great Molly is, and how incredibly smart she is. DH and I kept thinking he was nuts, but now we realize that it has been more of a 'user error' issue on our part, and
not a Molly issue! We will learn and so will she! Thanks again!

P.S. How much longer do you think Molly will continue to grow in height? At 7.5 months she is 22 inches at the withers, and 41 pounds.
 

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Having a puppy is work

With Puppy number four I am a little better prepared and yet not. Leonard is a sweetheart and a happy confident boy but he isn't used to being left alone. He just wants to be with his person, bit anxious when I leave him.

This how it's going so far

Saturday
Cried in the carrier on the hour trip home.

Cried in carrier on the way to vet, it was dark I don't think he liked it.

He wasn't keen on eating I hand fed him his food.

First night he cried a lot woke me, when he was crated for the night, five times fussing so, but no accidents in the crate, peed three of the five times that I took wordless took him out and put him into the X-pen to potty, returning him to the crate after 15 minutes.

Sunday

We hung out

Mealtimes
Leonard still wasn't keen on eating, I primed him with the raw that was sent home with me.

First meal I hand fed entirely

Second meal I primed and but fed part raw and dry with Leonard sitting in my lap

third meal primed with a pieces of dry kibble Leonard ate sitting next to me

Pottying every couple hours I would pop Leonard into his X-pen to relieve himself other wise he was tethered to me.

Sunday night - Leonard only woke me once to pee and whined twice but quickly settled when I reassured and hushed him.


Monday

I pottied him in his X-pen upon waking, pee poo on pad

Breakfast I gave him his raw portion which after a few moments eat sitting next to me.

I took Leonard to work with me

He happily greeted my co-workers asking for pets generally bounding around. No fear at all though he did prefer to snuggle in my lap and follow me about.

Lunch I primed him a tasty bit or two of the raw, which he finished eating on the floor about two feet away from me.

Leonard didn't potty at all when I was at work

He whined a bit on the way home until the car warmed up, can't blame him there.

I put him in the X-pen when I got home, he peed all over his front legs and poo-ed on the pee pad

Dinner Leonard ate two feet away from me

we did two sessions of alone time when I got home, first so I could eat undisturbed second just because, he did whine but I only fetched him when he was quiet.


Progress in my book

I am happy he is starting to eat and drink regularly, the rest will come

Leonard is 19 weeks old and left everything he knew, I was told his routine but it didn't matter, everything is new, his sister isn't here only a strange new person and strange new dogs.

All and all I think he is doing well, we'll get there
 

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I am 4 1/2 days in with my toy boy, he is so good in many ways but drives me bat crap crazy in other ways.

He absolutely does not being alone, but then again he never has been his breeder did say he was needy in this respect. He whines so during alone time, but he is so much better in the crate because he can see me and this is now our routine.

Last night I had a Christmas party to go to and I penned him with Beatrice and Pia and he was fine.

He is busy, and excited about everything feeding is a bit of trial , not interested because there is *insert whatever is going on*, I've brought with me to work all week, where has a wonderful time socializing or just chilling, believe or not no potty accidents.

On top of all this Miss Pia tested positive for Giardia( oh Pia my poo eater), so everyone is getting treated for it. So Leonard is taking Panacur and is also teething.


Not keen on his harness

Not keen on sweater or sweatshirts that keep him warm, bothered by collars. He chews on them
 

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:smile:Thanks Dechi, I know this will pass but I wanted to share as marvelous as Leonard is, he is still work
 

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I think I went through a late life crisis, that's the only thing I can think of as to why I'm putting myself through this.

First I go to the county animal shelter and haul home a 9 month old aeirdale/hellhound cross. It didn't take long to see why he ended up at the pound. I had brought a large, powerful, hyperactive, mouthy, destructive, demon into my nice quiet life. Believe it or not, I'm not even exaggerating. It was not a easy time and we still have a few issues, but under it all was a very intelligent, good natured, loving dog, I just had to bring that side of him out.

So 9 months later when I'm just starting to get my nice quiet life back, I go and get a 3 month old spoo and start the whole mess over again. Compared to Eustace, Roland has been a dream, but he still is a pup with all the trouble that comes with having a pup. At least this time I'll be starting with a clean slate and Roland will be trained properly instead of having to fix the mess Eustace's former owners made of him.

Well at least Roland has the cute card to play when I get frustrated with him, poor Eustace didn't even have that when I got him. The only thing that kept Eustace in his happy home is that I knew in my heart there was a good dog under it all and wasn't going to give up until I found that good dog.
 

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Then, inevitably a corner is turned and one unwanted behavior after another begins to disappear - while one wanted behavior after another begins to pop up regularly. YAY!
Wow, yes to that!

This whole thread is making me remember those first months. Hilarious that my first reaction was 'what problems'? I literally had to stop and think about it:)

I had searched a long time for a Service Dog prospect, so wanted to be able to train as well as I could so there wouldn't have to be too much retraining.

I loved him (still do!) so much that I ended up making almost all of his training an affectionate game. So he loves it.

He was 13 weeks and my breeder said the first thing to train was not to jump on me (or others) . He learned that in a day, and then I also taught him To jump on me so that he knew the difference and would be able to do that if I needed it for part of his Service Dog training, which I did later. I was traveling in a tiny trailer so it was sort of like both of us living in a big crate. It sure made it easy to keep track of him!

We hired the best trainer we could find three days later since I wasn't that experienced at the time and wanted to be trained well myself to train. (I am still learning). She was an awesome help, and kept saying that she was going to have to get a poodle herself as he was so easy to train. For months even after I was home I could call her for suggestions. By now I have even worked with Turid Rugaas for a weekend! 'Calming Signals' was one of the first books I used.

I had sworn I would never let a dog sleep in my bed. Well, that went out the window by the 2nd day! He still does.

I had been a widow exactly one year to the day he came to me. His mom chose me actually. Apparently she normally didn't make up to people but kept pushing him out of the way insisting I pet her. They were so startled at that he suddenly was mine. I had gone to visit the breeder and possibly get on a wait list for a future puppy. Jeepers, this is making me teary eyed just remembering.

However he is 9, and I would like to find a 1 or 2 year old to train as a service dog to take over. I probably should have started a year or so ago. But he is so lively I keep forgetting he is not a puppy:)

Cheers to everyone here who love their awesome poodles so!
 

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Wow

I came here looking for information, and boy do I feel informed!

I will be a first-time owner and training (with professional help/classes) the dog to be a SD. I hope.

I have been looking at breeders versus shelters, and my biggest fear with breeders is starting with a puppy, considering my complete inexperience! If I were living in my own place, it would be a different story, as I'm fairly laid back, and don't own many treasured items. But, I live in my family's house. I've been reading this thread, and trying to imagine how I could possibly prevent an adorable, fluffy whirlwind of destruction and poop/pee from destroying my parent's beloved sofas and clean carpets. . . . I can't imagine them staying calm with a screaming, crated puppy in the room above theirs. I can't imagine them remaining calm thru 4 months of potty-training -- honestly this would probably be the most challenging for them.

They agreed to a dog for pSD help, but I don't know if they could handle living in the same house with a baby dog. o_o

Thanks for all the stories and information, everyone. I may start a separate thread asking you all for more stories and specifics. X)
 

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I live in my family's house. I've been reading this thread, and trying to imagine how I could possibly prevent an adorable, fluffy whirlwind of destruction and poop/pee from destroying my parent's beloved sofas and clean carpets. . . .

I can't imagine them staying calm with a screaming, crated puppy in the room above theirs.
My Spoo as a pup never had one instant of "screaming, crated puppy". I trained him to absolutely love going in his crate and being there. I have only asked him to go there 3 times in 9 years. (Once when we had rowdy company, once when there was an uncontrollable dog visiting, once when workers might have stepped on him.) The other times he has gone totally by his choice, usually several times a day.

If you are following any trainer that has these results, it is not a trainer I would ever use.

Ditto for any 'whirlwind of destruction'.
 

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@kontiki, It's comforting to read your experience differs from what I was reading on the forum -- my post came from summarizing and combining some of the previous posts on this thread. Although, I should have put in landshark in there to make it a comprehensive summary. ;)

I truly hope raising a puppy will be possible here, especially with help.

I'm still at the meeting-trainers-stage, so I've yet to receive any pearls-of-wisdom (or otherwise) from one. :)
 

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Hi Zara,
It sounds like you will need to learn a huge amount about training before taking on the task of training a SD. Even with the best prospective dog, and the owner being a great trainer already, it is only about a 50% chance of an owner trained dog becoming a successful SD. Is there a reason for not going through a program?
 

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Another service dog handler here. I agree that unless your trainer has experience with SD's, and you work with the trainer before you get a dog, you might find yourself in over your head. Many aspects of training an SD are different from training a pet. If you can go through a program, that could be a better option. If not, search hard for a trainer and learn as much as possible about training dogs ahead of time.
 

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Unfortunately, you are both 100% correct. Owner training a service dog is currently inconceivably beyond my skill level. I have a pipe dream of finding a trainer in driving range that could help me overcome this.

Unfortunately I fall into the odd category of being a legal adult, and a civilian (non-veteran) with PTSD. This excludes me (or makes me less perceptibly 'in-need' in applications?) from many of the PSD programs I have researched and the few I've directly contacted.

If you or others have program suggestions and/or further thoughts, I'd be incredibly appreciative; I can create a new thread if preferable, respond to one of your creation, or am up to IMs, to avoid further derailing the thread x).
 

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Well for one thing I would not count on a rescued dog to be likely to succeed with SD training. Any dog in a shelter or rescue has some reason for having been in need of re-homing and can itself have the canine equivalent of PTSD.


As to screaming in the crate and all of those other things they are not always going to happen, but you have to know what to do to avoid such issues. If your parents are really not going to tolerate the things that do go along with a puppy (and they do make mistakes usually because we make mistakes) then is it really fair for them to have that imposition placed on them and their home?


Understand that most trainers who would work with you one on one are not necessarily likely to know the ins and outs of SD training. With you never having raised a puppy and not being able (seemingly) to use an agency to get a started dog the slope of the mountain you will have to climb is very very steep. About the only good suggestion I have for you on finding a trainer is to use the search tool of the APDT and look for someone who is CPDT-KA certified.
 

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Thank you for the insight; this thread and your responses truly were beneficial, even if they were not what I hoped to hear. ?

I understand that what I had to offer were not likely to be what you wanted to hear, but I think it is better to be candid and if possible based on one's own experience offer up what needs to be said rather than reassuring people of what they want to hear.



It isn't that I think what you hope for is a unicorn wish, but close to it and it will be better for you, your parents and your future dog being able to work for you to go in with your eyes wide open. I do wish you success and patience to find the right situation. I cannot imagine what horror you must have endured to have PTSD from a civilian life experience. I can barely say that I understand with a straight face.
 
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