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I know many on here have raised dogs from a puppy and others that may have been a little older, 1, 2,.. 5 years.

What are the pros and con of taking on a dog that is older?
 

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It really depends on what kind of life the older dog had. If they were trained, socialized and housebroken properly, then I can definately see the advantage to haveing an older dog. You really do get to skip all the puppy problems. If they were isolated in a kennel or backyard for the first part of their life, it's going to be a lot of work. (Not that it won't be worth it.) I have one of each (neither are poodles). Bailey was at least one and was left for dead in the backyard of a rental property, then brought to the local shelter by the landlord. He was an absolute mess! He was very fearful, sometimes aggressive and suffered from separation anxiety. He also wasn't housebroken and still isn't 100%. That's mainly my fault b/c I shouldn't have given in on crate training. I baby'd him a lot too. Harley was 10wks and an just an awesome puppy. He was super easy to housebreak, never chewed on anything innapropriate and does well in new situations. I posted pics of him from Halloween and I took him to Petsmart last weekend and he was great.

I don't think you should rule out a dog that hasn't had the best start in life, but you should be aware that there will be hiccups along the way. I'm always a bit annoyed when people start pushing rescue b/c you don't have to deal w/ the puppy stage. It gives people a false impression and they freak when a problem comes up. I think that's may be why some dog are returned to shelters and rescues. People are given the idea that dog is perfect (by the rescue or well meaning people who support rescue). IMO, it's easier to start w/ a blank canvas (puppy) then to correct the problems others have created (rescue dogs from bad situations). Again though, it's definately worth it if you're prepared and determined.
 

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I had someone tell me (she works in GSDs with schutzen training) that you can take a dog from the shelter and even though it's had a rough start to life, it be the most happy eager to please dog and go on to make a great partner. I think a lot of it just depends on the dog. Early training and socialization are very important especially in certain breeds and certain personalities but you can find an older dog that's a wondeful fit for your family out of any situation.
 

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I've always loved puppies, but since adopting Mitch at 2.5 years old, I don't think I could ever go back to puppy days.

It is definitely dependent on the dog's background. Some puppies are incredibly easy, others are hellions. Some adult dogs are great, house-trained, well adjusted, others are behavioural messes.

Some behaviour problems are easily solved with increased exercise, basic obedience, or the use of a crate. Other times, behavioural issues like separation anxiety are far more difficult to manage.

I think it's impossible to say the pros and cons of puppies vs. adults because there are too many outside/individual factors to take into account.

I treated my adult rescue the same as I would a new puppy. I set out the rules, got a feel for his personality, discovered his problem areas, and went from there.
 

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I think adopting an older dog would be great because you could be more aware of the personality type. I'll be honest, we love our Wrigley, but I wouldn't get another spoo with his personality again. However, I have seen other spoos that are much more content to be laid back and lounge lizards - that would suit our family much more than Wriggs. He is on the go ALL the time - pacing and pacing, whining and barking. It takes SO much to wear him out. My husband will jog with him and we give him outside time to run and explore but he is a really HIGH energy spoo. He was 1 in August and I just keep praying he will mellow out. (Don't mean to sound like we don't love him, it's just been a long rainy fall and he has been in ultra destructive mode lately -he actually ate part of my kitchen wall!)
The great news is that he loves everybody. I'm very happy for that.
 

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Just curious, did you get to meet his parents? Are they high energy? I know there are dogs that are just anomalies. My SIL has a pretty high energy Spoo that about the same age. I think part of the problem is he doesn't get enough excercise. (I'm not saying that whats going on with Wrigley, you made it clear that's not the issue.) I also think Paddy just a more active dog. SIL grooms his parents, but she's never mentioned if they are high energy.
 

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If you don't know the lines the dog came from it's hard to say whether he's been bred with hunting lines or not but they tend to be very high energy and need things to do. Harry is pretty high energy but he's not destructive inside the home thank goodness. That would be pretty difficult to deal with. Might try getting a treadmill. I hear they work wonders for those really high energy dogs.
 

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I did get to meet his parents and they were both calm. I've talked with the breeder about him (just to keep her informed and see what thoughts she has). She said that some dogs take longer to grow out of puppy stage and so I'm keeping fingers crossed.
I will say that I believe he is the kind of spoo that would be great for someone who was outdoorsy and on the go ALOT. We try to do a morning run and then I have a fenced in back yard and so I give him outside time but I'm sure he needs more. However, I can't do much more in that I babysit daily and hubby is teaching. If he would just come into the room (after his time out joggin or playing) and chill with me, it would be HEAVEN! But instead, he uses that time to run and find trash cans, kids shoes, etc. to chew up and string all over the house. So, I'm PRAYING that between 18 months and 2 years, we'll see a little more maturing and settling down. But if not, we love him and we'll have a Marley sequel to write! However, it has taught me ALOT about personalities and when we get another big dog (no plans now- just saying sometime in our lifetimes) I will really watch THAT specific puppy for personality signs. Or get an older dog that the personality is already obvious and established.
 

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I got Sport when he was about 4 years old. He is a wonderful couch potato and is very grateful. He is a true gentleman and very sweet natured. He is also absolutely bomb proof and doesn't get upset by anything (including blood work at the vet's). That all said he DOES have a few personality quirks that we have spent a lot of time working on. He does not love all dogs. He's great with most dogs but if one gets in his face there will be a problem (he's much better about this then he used to be). He also has a thing about cats. Not to mention he cringes is there is a spatula or some such thing lifted over his head.

These things are all issues that we have had to deal with and work on that are simply not a problem with our other 2 spoos, Betty Jo and Jenny. We got them as pups and have been able to raise them in the way we wanted to.

Then again Sport has never chewed anything since we got him. The same cannot be said about the girls. (However it has helped to teach the kids to put away toys least they be eaten, so it wasn't all bad)

Its kind of a mixed bag. You miss the puppy stage and all the issues true but then again you probably have to deal with other issues. I've got to say I love the puppy stage.

I also wouldn't have missed the chance to have any of my three.
 

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She said that some dogs take longer to grow out of puppy stage and so I'm keeping fingers crossed.
Have hope! Matrix was a wild thing until he reached about 2 years old. He's still a wild and crazy guy, but can relax in the house and be calm now.
 

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I did get to meet his parents and they were both calm. I've talked with the breeder about him (just to keep her informed and see what thoughts she has). She said that some dogs take longer to grow out of puppy stage and so I'm keeping fingers crossed.
I will say that I believe he is the kind of spoo that would be great for someone who was outdoorsy and on the go ALOT. We try to do a morning run and then I have a fenced in back yard and so I give him outside time but I'm sure he needs more. However, I can't do much more in that I babysit daily and hubby is teaching. If he would just come into the room (after his time out joggin or playing) and chill with me, it would be HEAVEN! But instead, he uses that time to run and find trash cans, kids shoes, etc. to chew up and string all over the house. So, I'm PRAYING that between 18 months and 2 years, we'll see a little more maturing and settling down. But if not, we love him and we'll have a Marley sequel to write! However, it has taught me ALOT about personalities and when we get another big dog (no plans now- just saying sometime in our lifetimes) I will really watch THAT specific puppy for personality signs. Or get an older dog that the personality is already obvious and established.
I dont know if this matters but is he crate trained?
 

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Yes he is crate trained - he is in it at night and if I am out of the house. I'm a stay at home babysitter, so out of the house is a trip to Wal-mart or church or getting the kids to and from school.
 

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I'm one of those "well meaning people who supports rescues" and I say if you are willing to put in the effort to raise a puppy you will have enough to put into an older puppy or adult dog.

I got my Standard at 11 months old and I could not ask for a better dog. Sure she had some issues coming from the situation she came from but now she is a happy well adjusted Poodle.
 

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I would so love to adopt an adult standard and give him or her a home. They normally come house trained, and although you may have to fix some issues that whoever used to own them had, but poodles are smart and catch on quick imo.

The only problem is that I'm going to be training my poodle for retrieving work, and I need to start young. =/
 

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When adopting an older puppy or dog into the household when you already have other dogs, wouldn't you have to make sure that the incoming dog meshed well with the existing dog or dogs? That was the problem I had with Ginger unfortunately.:( She was just too laid back for my Harry and it really did bother her and caused her to start snapping at him.
 

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When adopting an older puppy or dog into the household when you already have other dogs, wouldn't you have to make sure that the incoming dog meshed well with the existing dog or dogs? That was the problem I had with Ginger unfortunately.:( She was just too laid back for my Harry and it really did bother her and caused her to start snapping at him.
Sure you have to take into consideration your current dogs but you have to do the same with a puppy.

In all of the rescues I have had come though my home in past 5 years I have only had a handful that we could not keep/could not get along with our current dogs.

I get asked this question all the time but if you have a stable pack environment any dog should adjust to the way your pack runs.
 

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I don't see the same issues bringing a puppy in as an older dog just because puppies tend to be more submissive to older dogs but I'm sure it has happened where it's not the right fit.
 

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I desperatly wanted a spoo. But I really didnt' want a puppy. I would have loved a young (1-2 years old) poodle though, so I still had a long life with it... I didn't think my desires were at all realistic though! LOL

Along came Paris. 12 months old. Except she didn't live with me for another 18 months, BUT in those 18 months she would spend her days with me, and one evening a week with me as well, the occasional weekend etc... That, and it meant my (not-very-well-socialised) terrier coud meet her once a week and get to know her without trying to LIVE with her yet, meant they now get along great... they even share the big crate now! woooot!

Basically I never wanted to deal with puppy issues, nor the change of puppy coat, but I wanted a young dog. I got it, I love her, and I don't regret it at all. Will my next one be a puppy? Quite probably! But I certainly wont' turn away an older spoo when I'm looking either...
 

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I don't see the same issues bringing a puppy in as an older dog just because puppies tend to be more submissive to older dogs but I'm sure it has happened where it's not the right fit.
Depends on the puppy really, there are lots of things to consider here is a quote from my rescue site about adopting a dog:

Forever Home Animal Rescue said:
Looking For A New Dog?

First things first, when looking to add a new companion to your household you need to ask your self: Will getting another dog add to the harmony, health and happiness of my family? If you answered yes then your search begins. If you answered no then you need to look at the dogs you currently own and see what ways you can better your relationship and find fun new things to do.

Some people are taken by the first pair of bright eyes looking at them though the kennel doors but more often then not that sweet little puppy turns into your worst nightmare. So when choosing your new dog here are a few things to consider.

Puppy, Adult or Senior? Sometimes the allure of a puppy takes over our brains and nothing else matters but unless you look forward to sleepless nights, months of potty training and obedience classes then by all means go for that adorable puppy. But if you go to work very early and you would like to keep your new carpet, new for a little longer and want a calm companion then look for an adult or senior dog. Many, if not most have grown out of the chew stages, are semi to fully house trained and are ready to fall into a routine.
Puppies are awesome and tons of fun but not everyone has to start with a puppy and personally I like starting with an older puppy or an adult dog.
 

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I think it's really good. I personally think skipping the teething phase and the housebreaking phase is a plus in starting with an older puppy or young adult.
 
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