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We get our mini in a few weeks and I am trying to get ready with everything but I am still confused about the food schedule and needs for puppies. Sorry if there is a thread in here already but can anyone point me to a good resource that gives feeding guidelines from 8 weeks to adulthood? Like information on portion, dry wet options and change that goes from 8 weeks onwards. Also any other nutritional information as well as a list of ‘do not give’ foods and training treats. I’m also open to book recommendations. It would be super if there was potty training info and how to schedule food around the potty schedules if there is anything like that.

Also, does anyone do a mix of raw and store brought food? i would love to give raw but can not commit to it full time for now.
 

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For all things puppy, including potty schedule and feeding tips:


I would read this cover to cover as soon as possible, as it provides cohesive, reputable puppy-raising guidelines in an easy-to-follow chronological format. Getting advice in bits and pieces can be overwhelming.

You can also read it online for free, in two parts, but I prefer the book format:



How much food you serve will depend upon the brand and formula you choose. All pet food packages will give you general portion sizes according to weight. Puppy foods will also include portion size and schedule by age. These serving sizes will be a starting point, and can be adjusted up and down as necessary to keep your puppy at a healthy weight.

Speak with your breeder about what they're currently feeding, as you'll want to maintain puppy's routine while he or she gets settled. Then you can transition slowly to a new food, if you like.

As far as a can eat/can't eat list goes, here's a good one:


As a general rule, keep puppy treats to kibble or a single ingredient as much as possible (e.g. bits of plain white chicken breast). This is easiest on baby tummies, and will also help you to easily track down any food intolerances or allergies.

Keep in mind, too, that puppies typically get lots and lots of training treats. Another good reason to make healthy choices.

Dr. Dunbar also explains the benefits of hand-feeding in the book I linked. I highly recommend incorporating this method at least partially into puppy's first year.
 

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@JivaPoodle You get your mini in a FEW weeks?!

It's excellent that you are planning and prepping before you get your pup! You're laying a very good foundation. I, on the other hand, was so focused on what I was going to get that I barely considered what I would do after getting my pup. Big mistake as it was a very steep learning curve.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
@JivaPoodle You get your mini in a FEW weeks?!

It's excellent that you are planning and prepping before you get your pup! You're laying a very good foundation. I, on the other hand, was so focused on what I was going to get that I barely considered what I would do after getting my pup. Big mistake as it was a very steep learning curve.
Haha I have two small kids and if I am not prepared this is is not going to work. Plus I have not had a dog in 10 yrs and it’s amazing how much you forget.
 

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How very sensible to be planning ahead, and working out how to fit the puppy's routine into your day - pups thrive on routine and it can be tricky to establish in a busy family. Do be aware that pup's appetites vary over time - mine have always gone through phases when they are growing rapidly and are ravenous, interspersed with less hungry periods.
 

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I hadn't had a puppy in years so I went with the usually recommended 3 meals a day til my mpoo boys were about 6m.
As for scheduling, yes meals were generally at about the same time every day and still are. As young puppies, there was some correlation between eating and then the need to eliminate, but puppies are notoriously unreliable in doing what seems logical :).
As they got older and into adulthood now, they're pretty darn reliable as to when they need to eliminate vs when they ate.
 

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@JivaPoodle "Haha I have two small kids and if I am not prepared this is is not going to work. Plus I have not had a dog in 10 yrs and it’s amazing how much you forget."

Your common sense is not so common:) Your pup is very lucky to be going to your forever home.
 

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I'd also have a nice conversation with the breeder. Find out what time she was getting up with the pups and what her feeding schedule was, what she was feeding. Its best to try and follow her recommendations and slowly transitioning to whatever works for your household. Usually I also feed 3x a day until the pup starts to skip a meal or lacks interest in one, then I go to 2 meals a day.
 
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