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We are hopefully getting a puppy in mid October. This puppy is a mini poodle from a reputable breeder. The question is related to travel without her.

At what age and where would we leave her to travel out of the country? In country there wouldn't be a question as she would always be with us. Travel and all. However, we want to do some foreign travel and taking her with us is not an option.

We did some foreign travel when our last dog (standard poodle) was about 8 months but she went to stay with the breeder and we knew she would be happy there. This time it is not an option as the breeder is too far away.

So the question is what age is it safe to leave a puppy in a trusted kennel? I know she will need shots beforehand. And how do we find a good kennel? I didn't get a good vibe from our last dog when she came back from the last place where we boarded her. The good one before that closed. We have no one nearby that we can leave her with.

Thanks
 

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I have the same question. This is the absolute hardest part of having a dog!

We've got a trip scheduled for May, when our pup will just have turned 1. Looking forward to reading the responses here.

The breeder certainly would be ideal, but ours is also too far away.
 

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at what age? when they have all their shots and i believe some kennel mandates kennel cough vax. i know i would give it to milo. how to find one? perhaps stroke of luck and trusted reviews? we went away internationally twice so far and left him once with a trusted friend and the other we drove 8 hours one way to leave him with his breeder. so obviously i am not the best person to give out advice on where to leave your dog..lol i am also a bit terrified that i might come home to a diferent dog. we have a small boarding facility where i live but there's mixed reviews. plus i find milo, maybe its a poodle thing, is sensitive. he is not one to be staying in the crate surrounded by other dogs. he is more "i want to be with humans" kinda dog.
 

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Saphira, first congrats on the minipoo you're going to get!!! Yay!!!

But as for the age to start boarding, I would call and ask a vet! We do know a friend who started sending their pup there at I believe the age of 9 months?

So I have typed up a response to this many time but have deleted my big long rant about how I feel about resorts to not waste your time LOL. To make my own personal opinion (which is likely unpopular) short and sweet I would say to do heavy research on your location.
We sent our two English bulldogs there for about 4 days when they were around 3 years old, maybe 4, and they came out different dogs. Terrified and would flinch when we went to pet them.
I wont get into details unless you're interested. My personal opinion is to maybe ask a close friend or a family member for help. That is only because I am highly cautious of ever sending our dogs back! People I know have had good and bad experiences, it all depends on the location and your pup!! My family now will only go on a vaycay if we have help, if not one the family members stays back with the animals.

But if your only choice is to board, I would research extensively and ask around about other peoples experiences with that boarding location. Some pups absolutely love being boarded and they have a wonderful time!! I only say to be cautious because I would hate for anyone else to have a bad experience.
 

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I agree, this is a very difficult part of having dogs. Someone has already mentioned 'a trusted friend.' I was in this same situation when my spoo was 4 months old. I was expected to attend a work conference in Germany. In the end I was able to cancel out of the conference (turns out there wasn't a shortage of people willing to step in for me -- for a trip to Germany!).

My agility instructor had mentioned the possibility of my dogs staying with her, but staying home turned out to be the better option for me. It really was my other dog (she takes Xanax for her fear of noise: fireworks, thunderstorms) that forced the decision. While I'm willing to manage her fears (telework, hold her in my lap when needed) it's not something that most people are ready for, even other dog owners. I pay close attention to the weather, especially during thunderstorm season, ready to stay home with her if I need to.

If you don't have a trusted friend who can step in, search high and wide for a 'special' kennel. I used to go to one located in the country, the kennel runs looked like small rooms with plush dog beds, and the dogs had long walks twice a day. The owner would stay up late when thunderstorms came. Sadly she went out of business and left many of us scrambling. It would be worth it to drive a distance if you could locate such a facility. Have you considered a 'trusted' house sitter?
 

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Thank you all for responding. No one we can leave her with around here. I don't want to leave a puppy unattended even if can have someone come in to walk her.
So the original question stands. What age and how to find a place? I have started talking to people walking dogs around here, but so far they all use family members. We don't have any family around here. And don't want to burden friends..
 

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I would wait until you find a person you feel 100% safe with. For me, that was either my family (who have died or are no longer able to, due to location), my dogs' training center (where they received minimal care, but I knew they were safe, and currently, I would ask a dear poodle friend who lives nearby and hope she would take them all on!

What about asking your vet for recommendations?
 

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I called around to different boarding kennels, and asked so many questions. The one I ended up using told me all about their practices and what they do for the dogs on a daily basis. They did not have a fenced yard at the shop, but did have plenty of grassy area to walk each dog. They also had big play pens set up in the front of the shop so the dogs could be out front and meet and greet people, play with other dogs around their same size, and had toys. They did not have crates, they had kennels... chain link fencing with a gate. They went in size from 4’ tall to 12’ tall for the bigger dogs. They provided blankets, beds, and anything I took in for their comfort. They were walked 5 times a day, with the last being around 11 pm, then they were back at 7am. The kennels were kept clean all the time. There was no smell in the shop. It was absolutely amazing... and mud dogs were both happy when I went to pick them up. I could tell they had been treated very well. Also, I think they had a limit of 8 dogs per day so they could give all this extra care.

So maybe that will help you to ask questions on the phone when you call around? Once you get the answers you want, go and visit. Ask to see the kennels or crates where they will be. If you go middle of the day and it doesn’t smell, they’re probably good at keeping it clean.

As far as age, I think once they are fully vaccinated, there is no problem. But get to know your dog, see how she is with strangers. I think only you can really know when she will be ok with it. Due to an emergency hospital stay a long time ago, I boarded a 4 month puppy and he was just fine.

Hope this helps some.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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We used a chain day care/boarding business for the times we needed to board our girls. Overall, we were pretty satisfied. We took the girls and visited first to check the facility each time for general impressions of the current staff, cleanliness and to ask questions. We selected a place also for their policy of having someone on site 24/7, although there were no cameras available for the clients to hook up to.

It may have helped that we had family and friends that dropped by unscheduled to check on the girls at least once a day.

We used a well recommended dog/house sitter one time and that was not a great success. She hardly answered the phone when we called and just seemed a bit off. The girls seemed ok when we got home. Another time we had the teenage and very pet oriented son of friends stay at the house. That was fine except that he didn't get them out quite enough and didn't clean up after.

We're back to square one ourselves. We travel with our pups or DH goes on his Mini jaunts solo. We'd like to take a couple of trips out of the country and just don't have a solution that lets us feel comfortable leaving them.

I would recommend that whatever you find workable, add Plan B also. In our case, that was having family or friends also checking on our pups daily.

Do you have a trip planned or is this more general research? I don't think I'd leave a new pup until they'd had time and then some to feel at home with you. If there's a possibility of a trip very shortly after the proposed pick up date, could the pick up be postponed, if the breeder agrees?

If you decide to board, I'd take the pup there at least one time before, to help them get familiar with the place and maybe connect with a staffer. If they have daycare, even better. The pup doesn't even have to play in daycare, just be there without you for a bit. Then when you come back, they start to get the idea that leaving them somewhere isn't permanent.
 

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I think, and this is just my personal opinion leaving a young dog who is not potty trained may hinder the training as many kennel don't care if they potty in the kennel. I would find a trusted neighbor who would either keep the dog at their house or house/pet sit for you. I and another woman actually do that in our neighborhood. My friend only sits days. I and my daughter do both. I usually do the day part and my daughter (adult) will spend the night. Its a few extra $$ for us and a convenience for my neighbor as their home isn't unoccupied, mail gets brought in , trash out, plants watered, etc.
 

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Thank you all for responding. No one we can leave her with around here. I don't want to leave a puppy unattended even if can have someone come in to walk her.
So the original question stands. What age and how to find a place? I have started talking to people walking dogs around here, but so far they all use family members. We don't have any family around here. And don't want to burden friends..
I rely on word of mouth for nearly every service, followed by verification by other means. Is there a local training club — ours has a facebook page where a question could be posted. Vet offices or groomers may be able to help. There are national pet sitting services such as DogVacay, that list local service providers. One of our club members does this and will either visit your home or bring your dog into her home. Of course, ask for and follow up on references.

Perhaps post your location and a PF member might have more specific suggestions.
 

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I just don't know..I wouldn't leave my dog (thats me) in a boarding kennel that is unsupervised at night, most are unsupervised. I have left a dog to be boarded with my vet, did it once not again. Also unsupervised at night. At least I knew they were safe and they were older and fully trained. I've considered a place like a "camp bow ow", they at least get play time if you have that included. I guess you should contact our local poodle club or any dog club/training facility. We are pretty lucky in my neighborhood we will sit for one another. Sometimes it sounds expensive but your having your home watched at the same time, people notice the coming and going and the house doesn't appear empty. Personally I probably wouldn't want to leave my pup (at a facility) till they were at least 2 by that time they are trained and bonded to me and I wouldn't worry to much about them back sliding.So start with poodle club/vet/training facility.
 

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Has anyone tried the Rover app? I browsed my area today and there are a couple of people that sound like good candidates. They board in their house.

I've tried getting referrals from neighbors with no luck. And we don't know a lot of people here. Certainly no one's offered to help out when they heard we were looking.

I do agree that boarding an immature dog at a kennel could really set them back. Then again, only you know your dog. Some are just so laid back, they'll roll with anything. Whereas my last dog would have fallen to absolute PIECES in a kennel environment, at any age.
 

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PeggyTheParti, so I have not heard about the Rover app but I just found yesterday a place in my area called Petz Pack. Its an in home boarding too!

They are people who take in a pet for DayCare or an Overnight stay. They are trained to read Canines Body Language. I have seen a LOT of positive reviews about them online. I have asked friends but no one has used them. but the online folks seem to love them? I was thinking about using them as a daycare for Norman every once in a while to keep him active if I have to stay away from the house all day.

So maybe check the online views on Rover app? Though I like word of mouth better..
 

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Would never leave a small dog in a kennel but if you can have somebody house sit - as in live in your house for the duration - to water your plants, bring in the mail and be there for your pup. In our town (college town) lots of students who offer that. Also your vet should have references for people who offer to come a few times a day to your house (second best option).
 

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I found someone using Rover who seems to be a great gal, lots of verified positive reviews, clear communication, etc.

We're going to bring Peggy over for a meet & greet next week and then, if all goes well, drop her off for occasional day visits and an overnight or two throughout her first year, with the goal to feel comfortable leaving her there for ten days in May while we do an Alaskan cruise. She'll be a year old at that point.

Would be a dream to have a sitter that Peggy has grown up with and loves. She charges $35 a night for puppies and $30 a night for adult dogs, to board in her home, which is roughly the same rate as our most highly rated local boarding facility.

Fingers crossed!!

The app is super easy to use and it's really just a tool for local petsitters to use to connect with potential clients and manage bookings. Worth checking it out to see who's in your area.
 

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Use extreme caution with Rover!!!!

I have met the shadiest, and I do mean the shadiest people on this website. Even those with tons of verified positive reviews!!

Some highlights of my Rover experiences:

-Zooey was attacked and developed cellulitis from a bite on her head when I boarded her from our TOP Rover woman in the area. The woman never disclosed that she would be having any other dogs stay--I was under the impression that it was just her little Pom and Zooey for the 4 day stay. That is just the worse of it. I'm not even mentioning the minor details that the woman lied about. Fortunately, to keep her reputation in tact, she agreed to pay for half of Zooey's medical bills.

-I hired a young graduate student to come stay at my home with my dogs during one day. I told her she could come and go a little bit, but I was paying her (way over her Rover rate!) to actually stay at the home with my dogs. This is when Frosty was a puppy and I wanted more care than my dogs usually require. I get a text from her less than 5 min. after her arrival saying she was locked out when she went to get Starbucks. Um, could you have possibly gotten coffee on the way to the job???? I was paying her GENEROUSLY. Really generously. She was also obsessed with the money. Wanted to be paid up front, whereas with most jobs like this you are paid after you finish the job.

-Okay, and the grand finale: My home was burlgarized by another Rover woman, who received top reviews in my area. I had to deal with the police, who caught her, but it was a huge ordeal. Rover was totally crappy about it and was protecting her privacy instead of mine. Their wonderful compensation was to not charge me and to pay for the damage she did to my security cameras. Wow. Great. Long story short, I was able to find this woman on Nextdoor.com, having the nerve to look for more jobs. I got her last name there and did a background check and found out that she was a criminal felon! Even though Rover.com said she was background checked!!

Sooooo, I will never ever ever trust anyone on Rover.com again. I have also heard of animal abuse occuring by people who join Rover. In the scheme of things, I was extremely lucky that my dogs were never harmed!!! Unfortunately, just like childcare, dog care sometimes attracts some extremely shady characters.
 

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Is nextdoor.com active in your area? It is a site that you can only join for the neighborhood that you live in. Then neighbors post about things like a new restaurant that they like or or a lost dog, or they ask about how to find a refrigerator repair person or a new doctor. Of course everyone weighs in so you get some good sharing of opinions, all from your neighbors. Maybe that would be a good place to ask for recommendations.

Also, dog parks, dog sports clubs, trainers, groomers, and vets are all good places to get recommendations.

If you can find someone who will house sit, I think that is best. Probably more expensive, but best for your dog.
 

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Years ago my parents boarded our non poodle husky breed at a kennel about 30 minutes away in a rural suburban wealthy area. He went there for years and was always a little depressed when he came back but he was always nice and clean having been bathed as part of the service. One day my dad showed up extra early to pick him up by chance. They were still closed so he walked around and saw that all the dogs were in kennels sitting in their own filth, hence the need for a bath. After that I or another family member would dog sit. We have a friend watch our dogs but she will eventually be unable to so not sure what we will do

Personally I do not like people in my house so I think ideal is someone who will take the dog to her house. A friend used to have someone like that and she only takes certain dogs but you can see she likes them and is a dog person
 

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MF, that is SO sad that those people ruin it for everyone else—those who genuinely do good work and care about the job and animals, as well as those who need to hire help sometimes. ?

Makes me afraid to trust anyone really.
 
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