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Hello from the Uk!

First off thanks to all involved in this forum - I’ve been lurking and researching online for quite a while now and some of the threads I’ve read have been really useful.

We are hoping to welcome a standard poodle into our family over the next 12 months depending on when a litter is available and are going to meet with a breeder and her dogs next week which is very exciting!

One of the questions I haven’t seen, (it probably is somewhere but I haven’t come across it yet), is whether those who have welcomed poodle puppies have a basic set of must-haves?

There are so many toys, crates, X-pens, collars/harnesses, grooming equipment and other products geared towards puppy and poodle owners, and if it’s anything like my human offspring, I ended up with a lot of items used less than a handful of times which seemed like such a waste.

Any advice would be gratefully received - hope you all have a great weekend!

L
 

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Yes - there is a list somewhere.... but I will give you mine. Puppies are expensive, and puppy supplies are VERY expensive. Think of the confinement supplies as investments in not replacing furniture- couches, table legs, chairs, etc- and your stuff -shoes, clothing, computer cords, phones, rugs, etc.

Personally, I didnt buy anything that I didnt use A LOT with the possible exception of a collar I dislike and a slicker brush which I dislike. But lots of people swear by their slicker brushes so...
I highly recommend planning ahead and stalking local buy and sells/ online groups for used crates, x pens etc, as lots of people only use them for the first year or so. Luckily most large ticket things can last through their whole lives and be used for multiple dogs.

My list for the first month was:

Confinement:
  • 2 sizes of crates - small (20") and full sized (36" - as an adult, she now has a 48" crate). Both were used, one was borrowed so pretty inexpensive. Brought her home in small crate, switched within a week to 36" crate
  • 2 ex pens , 36 " tall joined together to make a big puppy room at first, and fence off my couch/living room later.
  • 2 baby gates. Dont need to be human baby safe, used is great.
Litter box and newspaper litter - not mandatory, but helpful as I was in an apartment

Food
  • ask what the breeder uses, and get that for an easy transition to your house
  • Sample food of other types - used as treats
  • Beef lung - treats to be broken in small pieces
Grooming:
  • Dog Shampoo. Puppies throw up. Enough said.
  • Steel comb (#1 most important) and slicker and pin brush
  • Nail clippers
  • If you are paying a groomer, not needed but clipper, blades, clipper cleaner/oil, clipper combs, scissors, etc.
  • Human hair dryer with a no heat setting, or HV dryer. I desperately want an HV dryer, but have been too cheap.
Misc:
  • Bigger collar - martingale, as she liked to slip her collar
  • 6' leash
  • Long line
  • Lots of old towels, for cleanup and bedding. Dont get a dog bed, as puppies tend to just destroy them.
  • A few toys of different textures. Rope toy (supervise for shredding), soft toys, rubber toys, braided socks, balls, etc. Different textures means they dont have to seek out your possessions to find something satisfying to chew.
  • Enzyme based urine remover, for cleaning and preventing future mishaps
  • Harness - for using with the long line if puppy pulls. I didnt need one until 6 mo or so.
 

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Exciting!! I always feel a little giddy when I hear that a member's going to meet with a breeder. Thanks for letting me live vicariously through you. :)

One way to save money is to purchase just one crate (the largest you can accommodate - ours is 48") but make sure it comes with an adjustable divider. That way it can grow along with your spoo.

Another way to save money is to invest in a couple of really good chew toys (we like puppy Kong - traditional and tire-shaped) and then just buy the rest from clearance bins. A teething puppy does best with loads of toys, of every imaginable texture. Just be sure to supervise at all times and toss at the first sign of destruction. The only toys I allowed unsupervised were the Kongs. The rest were for interactive play, basically to shove into puppy's mouth so she wouldn't chomp on me. ;)

I personally think an adjustable indoor exercise pen is worth its weight in gold. Before we had one, we were constantly trying to create barricades (which seemed to only invite being knocked over), find safe places to anchor a leash (one of which broke the leg of a cabinet, which could have had disastrous consequences), etc. Ugh.

We still use the exercise pen every day at dinner time or when we really need a break. And the adjustable style means we can use it at Christmas time this year to block the Christmas tree if necessary, or in any number of ways to make our lives easier, protect precious things, and prevent Peggy from making avoidable mistakes. (She is 14 months old tomorrow.)

I don't recommend stocking up on puppy food. Just a small bag, ideally the same brand as the breeder to start. You can assess puppy's needs from there.

Same goes for treats. Keep them very simple. Small bits of white chicken. Moistened kibble in a Kong with some frozen banana or apple. That sort of thing. Poodles are prone to allergies and sensitivities, so foods with minimal ingredients are best. We keep careful written track of everything Peggy eats, and it's proven helpful on more than once occasion.

Don't invest in beds or fluffy, fancy things. Some puppies will automatically urinate on soft materials. And it's hard for them to tell the difference between plush toys and plush beds when they're looking for things to chew. Easily washable towels work just fine for those early days.

Lastly, the very best way to save money (and energy) is to invest a little time in researching a single, reputable method of puppy raising. These two books (also available bound together in hardcopy for purchase at Amazon, etc.) are my go-to for every puppy I've had:



I believe reading both, cover to cover, should be mandatory for all prospective puppy owners, much like reading the driver's manual before getting one's license.

And take it a step further by lining up a good puppy class before your spoo even comes home! These classes provide invaluable socialization experiences for puppies, plus they're an excellent source of information and camaraderie for overwhelmed owners.
 

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Hi!
I'm so new to all this (we've had our SPOO puppy home for exactly 1 week!) so I only have one thing to add, which might be obvious, but I think in terms of crates/expens/etc -- it really depends so much on the layout of your house and your lifestyle. We have a fairly large house, 4 kids, and are home all the time. So we have
1) an xpen in the family room right by the kitchen, which is where he goes for awake downtime, if we're eating, and for indoor playtime with kids. (It's not huge but big enough for at least 2 kids + puppy to play),
2) a big metal crate with divider (to make it smaller for now) in the living room for daytime naps, and
3) a smaller crate in our bedroom which is where he sleeps for now.
4) a gate to block off the hall to the garage, which is where our children's approximately 10 dozen pairs of shoes are thrown on the floor upon entering the house. :ROFLMAO:

I don't know what we'll do down the road -- he'll definitely outgrow the smaller crate fairly soon -- I actually got it thinking that we'd use it for a Siberian cat eventually (they tend to be larger) -- but for now, this works. I'm guessing we'll end up either moving the living room crate to our room or he'll start sleeping on a dog bed in our room.

OTOH my SIL also just got puppy. They live in a 2BR condo with a teen son, are out more than we are, and when home can easily supervise the dog since there are effectively 3 adults to 1 puppy in a small space . So they have one crate, in their BR, and that works for them. Long winded way of saying, with the containment stuff at least, it really depends on your place, your stuff, and how much you can realistically keep an eye on the puppy when on the loose.

Anyway, so exciting!! The lists of stuff are so overwhelming but we do seem to be using everything I got ahead of time. (Very much like the list upthread). Except for treats. Apparently our puppy does not care for any of the treats I ordered, but it's fine, because he thinks his kibble is a treat. :rolleyes:
 

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Wow, thank you all for taking the time to post such detailed responses, this is really helpful - I’ve been itching to start buying some things to put away for when the time comes and this has given me even more of an incentive (or excuse!) to do so.

For want of a poodle - thank you for the itemised list which I will absolutely make my way through - I also like the idea of the couch-saving investments! It’s been a while since we had a puppy and you do tend to forget how much they like everything with their insides out 🤣

Peggy the Parti thank you very much for the really useful tips - I also forgot about how much fun the Christmas tree appears to puppies! I’ve been looking into training classes in my area and have narrowed down a couple which look really good and have also downloaded the Ian Dunbar books too - I think I saw these on another post you had made and they’re a great resource thank you 😊

Cody’s mom - thank you, I also have the shoe thing going on at my house - they don’t seem to make it an extra half a foot onto the huge rack for some reason 😂 I hope your new puppy is settling in well - how are you finding it?
 

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Peggy the Parti thank you very much for the really useful tips - I also forgot about how much fun the Christmas tree appears to puppies! I’ve been looking into training classes in my area and have narrowed down a couple which look really good and have also downloaded the Ian Dunbar books too - I think I saw these on another post you had made and they’re a great resource thank you 😊
Happy to help. :) Keep the questions coming!

Peggy was a dream during her first Christmas season. We kept all items out of reach, except for the Christmas tree, with all its precious, tantalizing ornaments. She didn't touch a single one.

But if I've learned anything about poodles, it's that "Safe today does not necessarily mean safe tomorrow!"

I fully expect Christmas #2 to be a disaster. Lol.
 

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Hi and Welcome to you all and Pending Spoo!

I don't know if this is the list FWoP meant but it's one I keep on file. Some and some more will be repetition because you've been nicely covered by responding members.

New Pup/Dog startup

Crates, Carriers, Exercise Pens, Beds/Bedding, Travel
Harnesses, Collars, Leashes
Food, Water, Bowls
Enzyme Cleaner, Pee pads, Poo bags, Paper Towels
Toys
Grooming
Health, Vet, Vaccinations Vs Socialization, Insurance, Care Credit, Emergency funds
Puppy proofing inside and out, including kitties


This is really more your basic startup info. It's taken from other threads and posts that many active members of PF has contributed to. I hope more Pfer's will add to this, comment or correct any mistakes.

Crates, Carriers, Exercise Pens, Beds/Bedding, Travel
Crates

Hard side plastic or wire is best for early days. If you choose wire, be sure there are no sharp bits, and be very sure that the door will stay fully latched with a bumptious puppy in it. It's not common but there have been some concerning reviews mentioning injuries.
No collars in the crate for safety.
Look for one with a divider in the size you expect them to grow into and use the divider to keep them comfortably cozy (stand up, turn around, sleep) til then.
Use a blanket as a crate cover.
Use a washable bath rug/towels or sherpa crate mat for bedding.
Put something leak proof on the floor of the crate or under it.
Depending on the layout of the house/apt, consider 2 crates, one for the sleeping space, one for the living space.

If you can manage it, have the pup sleep in your bedroom. They just think they're on an adventure until bedtime, especially the first night, rolls around. Suddenly they realize that NOTHING is familiar, no scent, warmth or comfort of mom or siblings. They are Alone.

Ask the breeder to do this or bring a towel or blanket to get mom and siblings scent on it, to comfort them.
Keeping them in the same room allows you to hear if they are unwell or need to go out.
Expect to have the young ones out several times during the night for a while.
Set a periodic alarm to beat them to it.

Don't count on a lot of sleep the first days or weeks. Taking a few days off from work or work from home, if you can, will really help set routines and gives some time to get to know each other. Find out if the breeder had them on a daily routine and try to follow that for a few days.

They're facing so many instant and incomprehensible changes. Keep what you can the same for a while.

Ex Pen
This expands their relaxation space but keeps them contained and out of mischief.
Food and water bowls as well as pee pads can be in that space.
Use a leak proof flooring here also.
These can be plastic or wire or even pop up soft side. (Same caution on wire construction.)

Beds and bedding
This may depend on the pups age and what they're used to. A young pup probably doesn't need one just yet. An older pup or dog may already be using one.

Carrier
These are generally only good up to about 15lbs but have their place.
A smaller crate with handles can double as a carrier.

Travel
Keeping your pup comfortable and safe in the car is important.
Depending on size and age, you might use a carrier, a crate, or a harness with seat belts.

Sleepypod brand is a highest safety rated product. Testing was done by the independent Center for Pet Safety, with some testing sponsored by Subaru.
There are a number of threads covering other brand suggestions. You can use the Search function to find them.

Harnesses, Collars and Leashes
Harnesses are usually a better safety choice for smaller pups due to potential trachea injury from collars, but it may not be the best choice for a pup who wants to pull.
Collars will carry tags and ID but don't have to be worn inside the home due to potential choking hazards.

Food, Water, Bowls
It's best to keep them on the same food as the breeder had for a while. They're already under stress from the abrupt change in their lives and this is one thing that doesn't usually need to change immediately.
They may go off their feed as it is, so keep an eye on that.
Toys are especially subject to hypoglycemia. This can very quickly become fatal. Look for the sticky on it.
If/when you want to change foods, look for foods which follow the AAFCO guidelines and companies which have a veterinary nutritionist formulating the foods.
Stainless steel or ceramic is best for their food and water bowls.
You might consider filling a bottle with the water they've been drinking at the breeders and mix it with the water at their new home, to acclimate.

Enzyme Cleaner, Pee pads, Poo bags, Paper Towels, Bitter Apple Spray
Pretty much all self explanatory.
Natures Miracle is usually recommended for enzyme cleaner.
Bitter Apple Spray is to keep them from mouthing and biting on what you don't want them to.

Toys
Have a selection of several different types on hand.
Check with your vet for safe chewing toys. They also work as trade to get your fingers back
Puzzle toys are good, and Kongs to hide kibble and treats are helpful.
Not exactly a toy, but something to consider is the Smart Pet Love Snuggle Puppy toy. This can help soothe a pup.

Grooming
I hope others will have specific suggestions for combs, brushes, shampoos…
It is important to get them used to the grooming process asap.
The longer you wait, the harder it is on the pup and whoever's doing the grooming.
It does not hurt their coat to get a puppy trimmed

Health, Vet, Vaccinations Vs Socialization, Insurance, Care Credit, Emergency funds
Ask if any other dog on the premises has been ill in the last week or so. Choose a vet if you don't have one and know where the ER clinic is.
Have the pup checked out by a vet within a day or two of homecoming whether the breeder requires it or not.
Puppies can socialize with vaccinated adult dogs, and probably known puppies who aren't fully vaccinated yet.
Best to stay away from paws on the ground at places a lot of dogs might be til yours is fully vaccinated.
People are not usually any risk or at risk.
Consider pet insurance, at least for the first year or two, or sign up for Care Credit if there is a health emergency.
If you can, a healthy four figure separate savings account dedicated to emergencies can be a life saver, literally.
Keep a first aid kit and learn some first aid procedures.

Puppy proofing inside and out, including kitties
Check your fencing if there is any. You want to keep things out as well as puppy in.
Check your plant life for possible toxic plants.
Inside keep cords and cables covered or out of reach.
Be sure that kitties or other free roaming animals in the home have a safe retreat from Puppy.
Anything puppy level is at risk.


Besides pet stores, there is Amazon, Chewy.com, and eBay and Etsy for supplies. Other brick and mortar stores if they're nearby are Tuesday Morning, Marshall's, HomeGoods, Sierra Trading Post and TJ Maxx. The last two are also online.
(Apologies for the US centric shopping references, but they're what I know.
 

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Yes - there is a list somewhere.... but I will give you mine. Puppies are expensive, and puppy supplies are VERY expensive. Think of the confinement supplies as investments in not replacing furniture- couches, table legs, chairs, etc- and your stuff -shoes, clothing, computer cords, phones, rugs, etc.

Personally, I didnt buy anything that I didnt use A LOT with the possible exception of a collar I dislike and a slicker brush which I dislike. But lots of people swear by their slicker brushes so...
I highly recommend planning ahead and stalking local buy and sells/ online groups for used crates, x pens etc, as lots of people only use them for the first year or so. Luckily most large ticket things can last through their whole lives and be used for multiple dogs.

My list for the first month was:

Confinement:
  • 2 sizes of crates - small (20") and full sized (36" - as an adult, she now has a 48" crate). Both were used, one was borrowed so pretty inexpensive. Brought her home in small crate, switched within a week to 36" crate
  • 2 ex pens , 36 " tall joined together to make a big puppy room at first, and fence off my couch/living room later.
  • 2 baby gates. Dont need to be human baby safe, used is great.
Litter box and newspaper litter - not mandatory, but helpful as I was in an apartment

Food
  • ask what the breeder uses, and get that for an easy transition to your house
  • Sample food of other types - used as treats
  • Beef lung - treats to be broken in small pieces
Grooming:
  • Dog Shampoo. Puppies throw up. Enough said.
  • Steel comb (#1 most important) and slicker and pin brush
  • Nail clippers
  • If you are paying a groomer, not needed but clipper, blades, clipper cleaner/oil, clipper combs, scissors, etc.
  • Human hair dryer with a no heat setting, or HV dryer. I desperately want an HV dryer, but have been too cheap.
Misc:
  • Bigger collar - martingale, as she liked to slip her collar
  • 6' leash
  • Long line
  • Lots of old towels, for cleanup and bedding. Dont get a dog bed, as puppies tend to just destroy them.
  • A few toys of different textures. Rope toy (supervise for shredding), soft toys, rubber toys, braided socks, balls, etc. Different textures means they dont have to seek out your possessions to find something satisfying to chew.
  • Enzyme based urine remover, for cleaning and preventing future mishaps
  • Harness - for using with the long line if puppy pulls. I didnt need one until 6 mo or so.
Great list. We had an apartment with ceramic tile floors, so just used baby gates in a couple of doorways. One was a more expensive adjustable metal one with a one-handed latch for a step through door, very good investment for the million times a day I needed to enter the penned off area

Sent from my STV100-3 using Tapatalk
 

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@Rose n Poos Thank you very much for all of this - I hadn’t thought about having doggy first aid but it makes perfect sense, thank you!
First aid kit is excellent. We are back country camping a lot, and it would take hours to get to a vet . We carry a rather extensive one our vet advised us one

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