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Hello all! We are seriously considering adopting a senior standard poodle that I happened upon online. I sent the rescue an email for more information on him, and am waiting to hear back. He is listed as a breeder surrender, retired Grand Champion. He was born in 1999, so that makes him about 11 years old. He has a clean bill of health and is still very active, and is supposed to be good with other dogs and kids. He appears to be a black, but he's graying a bit. I don't know much else about him yet. We had planned to adopt another spoo in the future. I had mentioned we were interested in a silver male. We are leaning a bit towards adopting an older dog, simply because we just don't want to go the puppy route again. It's very time-consuming and alot of work. All dogs are work of course, but puppies just need so much more attention and training. I have never adopted a senior dog, and would like some opinions or advice on what I would be in for and what to expect. has anyone else adopted a dog of that age? Thanks so much everyone!
 

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We adopted/rescued a 14 yr old sheltie, the only down side was she was only with us for aprox 9months. She was an absolute joy!
 

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We sure enjoyed our Rudi while he was with us. He was supposed to have been 9 yr old when we adopted him. I think he was a good deal older. We had him for 8 years.
 

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I personally think there is a special place in heaven for people who adopt senior dogs. And a special place in that other place for people who casually dump a senior dog at a shelter. (I realize there are situations where the person is very old himself/herself, and dies or needs to go into a nursing home.)

I am a one dog person, and am a wimp about dealing with the old stages, so the idea of taking on an older dog when the old stages are 5 years away as opposed to 10 years away is tough to contemplate, in part because the final stages with my first boy were so agonizing. I honestly hope to grow into the sort of person who can take on an older dog, give it all the love and joy it may have been missing in its younger years, and see it gracefully over to the other side. I would also add that as painful as losing my old dog was, the intense bond of the final years was also far more special than any puppy antics. There is something special about a dog who finds joy in life even when physical infirmities begin to catch up with him. There is also something special about a dog who seems to realize on some level he will leave this world alone, but who cherishes your company in the meantime all the more...
 

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they rock!

My first poodle is a senior and he is the greatest little guy ever. We don't know his back story because he was picked up as a stray but best estimate is that he's 9-11 years old. He's happy, not destructive, and even though we've only had him since June, he's bonded to the family super tight. Seriously...you can't tell the difference between him and the dogs I whelped. I love senior citizens because they are happy just to hang out and be with you. I lost my first border collie when she was only 10 and I always felt like I'd been robbed of her "golden years." Now my border girl's son is 9 years old and he and Oliver the poodle are best buds. Of course there is about 35 lbs. difference in their size but they hang out on the sofa and watch the fish for hours. Senior dogs are the best.
 

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The downside of course is that you won't have this dog for very long. The huge upside is that he has already been trained, and as a senior, will probably be more calm and less active than a younger dog. It's a generous, loving thing to do to take in a senior and enjoy whatever time you get with him. It can be a very good match for people who not only don't want to go through puppy training, but also don't want to go through the high energy needs of the young to middle aged adult dogs.

Pippin was probably about 6 when we got him, making him about 9 now. He is a sweetheart and I would do it again in a minute. Granted age 6 is not quite "senior," but certainly he was "mature."
 

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the main upside is that these dogs are VERY hard to place purely for age no other reason :( most sit in sheltres til their time is up or until a rescue fostre home movse on then they get bounced. The two rescues i work with hve older dogs (large) over 9 years old both have been fostred over a year now :(

Go for it. you'll have to deal with issues sooner. but if hes looking good at 11 he should have quite a bit left in him
 

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My husband and I adopted Duke who was supposed to be around 8 years old. He had been severely malnourished and had chemical burns on his body, hip dysplasia...just a mess. There was something in his eyes that just stopped you in your tracks and so we took him in and figured we could give an old dog a comfortable end. We had him for 5 years and he was the best dog I have ever known.
I say go for it. A life without knowing Duke would have been a lesser experience. He was that awesome! i dont think we enriched his life nearly as much as he enriched all of ours.
 

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My initial response to this thread was to encourage you to go for it if you're aware of the potential geriatric issues that will inevitably come along... then I re-read your original post...

He is listed as a breeder surrender, retired Grand Champion. He was born in 1999, so that makes him about 11 years old. He has a clean bill of health and is still very active, and is supposed to be good with other dogs and kids. He appears to be a black, but he's graying a bit.
This makes me sooooo SAD!!! Why wouldn't the breeder just keep him for the few years he has left? He (apparently) gave this person his best years and gained them a Grand Champion title, and now they're just surrendering him to rescue?? I completely understand that we don't know everything there is to know about this situation... maybe there is a good reason he/she had to give this old gentleman up - but it still makes my heart sad for the poor dog!!

If I had unlimited space/time/resources for dogs, I know I'd be taking in some of the oldsters, too - my Hannah-banana is somewhere around 11-13 years old and she is completely AWESOME! Good luck with your decision and keep us updated!

Barb
 

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I also rescued a 28yr old retired Arabian horse, 9yr old collie! I worked in a retirement home at the time and was always teased about running a geriactric home for animals too! I beleive all creatures deserve love and respect in thier final years. So hedgehog to horse gotta love em!
 

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Pros are you will likely get a calm, loving, well mannered dog who will love you for as long as he lives.

Cons are you might have limited time with him and lots of vet bills and health problems.

We got Stella, who is a retired champion, in the last 6 months and she will be 8 this month. She needed some dental work( $500.00) and was found to have mammary gland cancer. She had surgery to remove the masses ($450.00). She may very well live many more healthy years..and she may not.

I do think its wonderful if everyone could adopt or purchase an adult or senior dog. They so deserve a good life. I prefer at least an adult for the reasons listed above..we both work full time and I think a puppy needs someone home more during the day.
 

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A retired grand champion would be my dream dog at any age. He probably has NO hereditary health issues, stands still for grooming, is used to being handled, walks well on a leash and has a nice long life ahead. Please take hime and love him.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Update on senior spoo**Well, I spoke to the adoption coordinator, and she seems to think he would do better in a home without young children. I was pretty bummed about it, but what can you do. She also told me about another spoo that is in foster care, but not yet listed for adoption that was an owner surrender. He is 3 years old . She thought we would be a good match for him. I'm still talking it over with my husband. We would have 3 pretty young dogs then that would require alot of exercise and time. Don't get me wrong, I am really excited about the possibility of another spoo! I just didn't think it would fall into my lap so soon! If we get this guy, then that is my spoo limit!! No more than 3 for me!! LOL!
 

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Three dogs is a lot of dogs! That said, yes, they all require exercise, but if you have a fenced in yard, it's just as easy to let three dogs out to run around as it is one. They can help exercise each other.

When you feed the dogs, so long as no one has guarding issues, it's just as easy to put down three bowls as it is one.

What you can't skimp on is individual time for training. But you can break training into 5 or 10 minute increments and you can tie it into your daily routine. For instance, work on sit-stays while you are in the kitchen preparing meals. Work on "wait" when you go to the door and open it (whether or not someone is really there - the point is they "wait" while you open the door without them running outside). If you are not interested in doing formal obedience those little bursts of training will likely be enough.

It's a big decision, but sounds like you definitely want a third dog. If so, go for it! And do post pictures. ;-)
 
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