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Possibly interested in getting a poodle in the near future, just wanting to learn about prices. I am not looking for one with papers, pet only. I live in the Midwest, what prices are reasonable? And are standard poodles generally lower or higher prices than poodle hybrids? TIA!
 

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Welcome to PF. You should expect to spend 1500 to 3000 for a nice standard poodle. I would look for a well bred dog from a good breeder. "Just a pet" puts you at risk for back yard breeders or worse. Look at this PF thread. Buying a puppy safely - the basics

And here is a reproduction of a blog about not wanting a show dog and actually why you should want the best show dog you can get so to speak.




I Don’t Want A Show Dog; I Just Want A Pet. by Joanna Kimball on July 13, 2010

This is one of the most pervasive sentiments that puppy buyers, especially families, express when they're looking for a dog. What they really mean, of course, is that they don't want a show BREEDER – don't want to pay the high price they think show breeders charge, don't want to go through the often-invasive interview process, and think that they're getting a better deal or a real bargain because they can get a Lab for $300 or a Shepherd for $150.

I want you to change your mind. I want you to not only realize the benefits of buying a show-bred dog, I want you to INSIST on a show-bred dog. And I want you to realize that the cheap dog is really the one that's the rip-off. And then I want you to go be obnoxious and, when your workmate says she's getting a puppy because her neighbor, who raises them, will give her one for free, or when your brother-in-law announces that they're buying a goldendoodle for the kids, I want you to launch yourself into their solar plexus and steal their wallets and their car keys.

Here's why:

If I ask you why you want a Maltese, or a Lab, or a Leonberger, or a Cardigan, I would bet you're not going to talk about how much you like their color. You're going to tell me things about personality, ability (to perform a specific task), relationships with other animals or humans, size, coat, temperament, and so on. You'll describe playing ball, or how affectionate you've heard that they are, or how well they get along with kids.

The things you will be looking for aren't the things that describe just "dog"; they'll be the things that make this particular breed unique and unlike other breeds.

That's where people have made the right initial decision – they've taken the time and made the effort to understand that there are differences between breeds and that they should get one that at least comes close to matching their picture of what they want a dog to be.

Their next step, tragically, is that they go out and find a dog of that breed for as little money and with as much ease as possible.

You need to realize that when you do this, you're going to the used car dealership, WATCHING them pry the "Audi" plate off a new car, observing them as they use Bondo to stick it on a '98 Corolla, and then writing them a check and feeling smug that you got an Audi for so little.

It is no bargain.

Those things that distinguish the breed you want from the generic world of "dog" are only there because somebody worked really hard to get them there. And as soon as that work ceases, the dog, no matter how purebred, begins to revert to the generic. That doesn't mean you won't get a good dog – the magic and the blessing of dogs is that they are so hard to mess up, in their good souls and minds, that even the most hideously bred one can still be a great dog – but it will not be a good Shepherd, or good Puli, or a good Cardigan. You will not get the specialized abilities, tendencies, or talents of the breed.

If you don't NEED those special abilities or the predictability of a particular breed, you should not be buying a dog at all. You should go rescue one. That way you're saving a life and not putting money in pockets where it does not belong.

If you want a purebred and you know that a rescue is not going to fit the bill, the absolute WORST thing you can do is assume that a name equals anything. They really are nothing more than name plates on cars. What matters is whether the engineering and design and service department back up the name plate, so you have some expectation that you're walking away with more than a label.

Keeping a group of dogs looking and acting like their breed is hard, HARD work. If you do not get the impression that the breeder you're considering is working that hard, is that dedicated to the breed, is struggling to produce dogs that are more than a breed name, you are getting no bargain; you are only getting ripped off.
 

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Most of the ‘show breeders’ keep only one puppy from a litter and sell the rest to pet homes. This was a surprise to me as well when I was searching for a puppy 4 years ago. There are many, many responsible small-scale breeders and it shouldn’t be difficult to find a puppy from health-tested parents and raised in a home environment (versus a breeder who produces many litters/year), particularly if you aren’t set on an unusual color/size.

Each litter will have a range of personalities, from high-drive performance dog to laid back family pet. Once you’ve identified some responsible breeders, contact them for more information about their program and any planned litters. Most will refer you to others if they have no litters planned within your time frame.

I used the resources of the Versatility In Poodles (VIP) organization, the recommended health tests of parents, and questions to ask breeders. It’s fine to ask PF members if they have experience with breeders that you’re interested in.

 

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You will probably pay less for a well bred standard poodle than you would for a hybrid. My dog came from health tested background with many show dogs in his background. He is a pet only. My neighbor had to have a hybrid she liked the look (by the way if I don't groom mine could have almost the same look). She lost her dog to cancer a few months back after spending, $15,000, on him hoping to cure. Yes crazy as it sounds but she has 5 kids and the means so she did everything she could. HIs breeder said the parents were health tested but frankly all they tested for was hips and she didn't look for proof. She spent 2x as much for her pup as I did for mine for the initial purchase. Her mom also bought one from same breeder about two years later, so far he is healthy but again his initial cost was 2x that of my well bred poodle. There are many breeders out there that are testing and have pet puppies for between $1200-3000.
 

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If you do decide to get a dog w/o papers just make sure that you're getting what you paid for.

One of the dogs in Normie's obedience class was purchased from a pet store as a purebred Bichon. The owner is now sure that it's a mix. But he paid as much for his mix as we did for our AKC poodle. And he's angry because he feels cheated.

One of the dogs in his playgroup was adopted from a rescue group as a Boxer but is, in reality, a Boxer/Jack Russell mix. That's a really hyper combination and the dog is really big and really difficult to control. To be honest, I'm concerned that she's going to accidentally hurt the elderly owners.

Good luck in your search.
 

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Possibly interested in getting a poodle in the near future, just wanting to learn about prices. I am not looking for one with papers, pet only. I live in the Midwest, what prices are reasonable? And are standard poodles generally lower or higher prices than poodle hybrids? TIA!
Hi and Welcome!

I'm in the Midwest. When you say "papers", do you mean AKC registration only? or also papers proving health testing of the parents?

AKC papers only mean the pup is registered as a purebred, in this case, poodle. It doesn't mean it's a show poodle. Without the registration you'd have a pup which might be pure poodle or might be mixed breed presented as pure poodle or mixed breed presented as mixed breed.

The pricing for a registered purebred mentioned above by lily cd re sounds typical for a registered purebred standard poodle. The upper end may be a bit high for the Midwest market, and the lower end might go a bit lower. Breeders of the mixed breed poodles generally sell for those same prices and I've seen higher.

There is no standardized health testing for mixed breeds, like there is for purebreds, since none of the mixes have been bred to the point of reproducing the same results reliably with each breeding. Mixing two different purebred dogs doesn't create a new breed. It creates a mixed breed. A new breed takes generations of dogs carefully selected for genetic characteristics for health, temperament, and looks which can be reliably reproduced, and, to then ensure that the breed is improved by identifying and breeding out genetic weaknesses.

Keep asking questions!
 
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Hopefully this isn't too off topic, but the Canine Chronicles has a interesting article about doodles in their March edition (here: http://www.onlinedigitalpubs.com/publication/?m=2330&i=652835&p=84&id=8717 ). It includes a discussion about why people like doodles, and what the doodle breeders are getting right and wrong; outlining two doodle registries that require extensive testing (this was news to me). Also, discusses the financial side of AKC, and how the math of a closed registry has impacted that. All of this while acknowledging what we all know to be the down side of doodles: you can't take two poorly bred purebred dogs and expect that breeding them together is somehow going to give you great "hybrid vigor."
 

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Hopefully this isn't too off topic, but the Canine Chronicles has a interesting article about doodles in their March edition (here: http://www.onlinedigitalpubs.com/publication/?m=2330&i=652835&p=84&id=8717 ). It includes a discussion about why people like doodles, and what the doodle breeders are getting right and wrong; outlining two doodle registries that require extensive testing (this was news to me). Also, discusses the financial side of AKC, and how the math of a closed registry has impacted that. All of this while acknowledging what we all know to be the down side of doodles: you can't take two poorly bred purebred dogs and expect that breeding them together is somehow going to give you great "hybrid vigor."
Hoping to find the linked info w/o leaving an email addy somewhere. I'll keep searching that. I found one doodle association spelling out their testing requirements, so yay! to that. On only quick glance, I'm not sure if they're doing full breed relevant testing, poodle and golden, to cover all bases or if the genetic mixtures will require a third set of testing (which this may be), but has the mixture stabilized to where things are more predictable for that? Is that even a relevant question?

This is very interesting and that's only the testing side. I'd say this deserves it's own thread :).
 
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This is very interesting and that's only the testing side. I'd say this deserves it's own thread :).
Okay, Rose. New thread started in Off Topic Chat, with more details added. I'll be interested in hearing your thoughts.
 

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Possibly interested in getting a poodle in the near future, just wanting to learn about prices. I am not looking for one with papers, pet only. I live in the Midwest, what prices are reasonable? And are standard poodles generally lower or higher prices than poodle hybrids? TIA!
Hi and welcome. I also am in the Midwest. I do not know much about breeders in this region, but I periodically look to see what dogs are available for adoption, especially poodles. If adoption is something you would consider, it is possible to find younger poodles and poodle mixes (mostly poodle mixes). Some come from rescues down south, and some have been rehomed. My girl was rehomed. Nothing wrong with going to a breeder, but if you are not sold on a specific breed, I just wanted to throw that out there.

Good luck with your search and decision!
 

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Our mini phantom sable pup was $1500 from a breeder in Colorado. I must have called a dozen breeders and pricing varied up to $5000.
 

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I'll try over at General Chat. Newport's thread is picked up over there, fyi.
 

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Thanks, Rose. All who want to read the article, it has been posted on the General Chat follow up thread.
 
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