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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

So I'm pretty sure I'm going to ask a question someone else has asked before myself, but I couldn't find the answer on my own so I do apologize in advance. Anyway, I've noticed for a good purebred poodle (and other breeds as well) the average price for a pup is usually around $1000-$2000, sometimes $2500 or a little more. Although I don't really mind some of the prices, I'm just a little curious. Is there a difference between the $1500-2000 puppies and the $2500+ ones? For most sites that I've looked into, the sire and dam have the same titles and health testing. Colors as well at times. This is not the case for all, but most sites that I've looked at so far.

What's up with that?
 

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I've been doing a lot of research over the past few months for a standard poodle puppy on the east coast - I currently have over 40 breeders on my spreadsheet! (I'm a bit type A....). The typical range that I've run across is $1800-$2500 with 1-2 at $3000. I've had similar questions. From what I can tell, those that are less than $1800 don't have all the health testing I'd like to see and they seem more like businesses as oppose to small hobby breeders. They can likely charge less because they have a higher volume of puppies. My question has been why those few breeders I've come across are $3000, which I haven't quite figured out. I guess it's a combination of what they've been able to charge in the past, the demand for their puppies, and the numbers of other, respectable breeders in their area.

But that's just my limited experience and recent research!
 

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We’re on the same coast! Man, you found 40 spoo breeders? I need to get on your level of research lol. I've just been bookmarking breeder sites/pages and as I further my education, I go through them to see if those same breeders are missing anything crucial. But I also assumed the same when it comes to the “cheaper” breeders. I have to agree, they miss out on a lot. I never thought about the more expensive breeders charging more because it's what they got away with in the past though...thats a great possibility.

I was also thinking maybe they charge more because that said puppy’s pedigree includes a dog or bitch that's won a a major show? Like crufts or Westminster?


EDIT:

I didn't think about that Pony...but that sounds kind of funny to me for some reason
 

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Not sure if you've seen this, but on the off chance you haven't, it's possible there may be a few breeders you haven't seen. Don't skip the health resources if you're not familiar, and don't bypass the multi state listings, jic.


You'll pretty commonly see $1500-$2500 as the US ballpark for wellbred poodles from conscientious breeders. $1000-$3000 is an extended range.

Location (cost of living) can be a factor, full registration on a co-owner for showing to title before breeding type agreement vs limited registration, things like that don't bother me.

Pricing based on size or color is a no for me. Pricing based on sales volume or availability is a no for me.

If pricing is based on any monetary level, it should reflect what the breeder has invested in their dogs and their breeding program.
 
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Prices will vary a lot, but for puppies from highly titled parents I would expect $2k-2.5k (some maybe 3k) for spoos. Even with these prices I don't think these top quality breeders generally make any profit off of selling puppies. I think they charge prices that help them to cover their hobby enough to keep going. What these prices are will vary depending on what the breeder's particular costs are and the time they're investing. So there are too many variables to make blanket statements about cost. I think you have to take all the facts for each breeder as a whole and see how it meets your priorities. But any price below $1500 is really low for a poodle and would make me ask questions. When I was searching my shortlist varied from $1500-3000. But what drove my decision wasn't price.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've seen a few breeders that I truly admire on there! I'll look into it some more. But how can you tell that the price reflect how much a breeder puts into their program or dogs? I mean, a lot of the dogs are pretty so I know I can't base it off of that. Should I go off health tests since those seem to be a very accurate resource to tell you how well they're doing so far with their breeding?
 

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I've seen a few breeders that I truly admire on there! I'll look into it some more. But how can you tell that the price reflect how much a breeder puts into their program or dogs? I mean, a lot of the dogs are pretty so I know I can't base it off of that. Should I go off health tests since those seem to be a very accurate resource to tell you how well they're doing so far with their breeding?
Health tests, titles, how they raise the pups. Also the pedigrees of their dogs... do the dogs come from other great dogs that are highly titled.
 

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You're right in that you can't tell how much a breeder has invested, dollar for dollar. Raindrops mentioned good points above.
Health testing to at least the CHIC requirements is a start. If they've invested there, they are likely investing in other areas.
If you find a breeder that is also titling their breeding dogs, that's a big investment in proving their dogs meet breed standards, or perform to their best abilities.
The time they spend finding best matches for breeding, not only for genetic health, also to improve breed traits and to improve genetic diversity...
LOL Raindrops was far more succinct :). And right about $1000 being very low. It's been a few years, but it wasn't unheard of in the Midwest then. It wouldn't likely be a puppy price now, but possibly a breeder rehome of a pup or adult.
 

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You're right in that you can't tell how much a breeder has invested, dollar for dollar. Raindrops mentioned good points above.
Health testing to at least the CHIC requirements is a start. If they've invested there, they are likely investing in other areas.
If you find a breeder that is also titling their breeding dogs, that's a big investment in proving their dogs meet breed standards, or perform to their best abilities.
The time they spend finding best matches for breeding, not only for genetic health, also to improve breed traits and to improve genetic diversity...
LOL Raindrops was far more succinct :). And right about $1000 being very low. It's been a few years, but it wasn't unheard of in the Midwest then. It wouldn't likely be a puppy price now, but possibly a breeder rehome of a pup or adult.
You can tell whether I'm replying by pc or phone by how long winded I am! Good points of course.
 

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Im in Europe so I can't speak for the situation in the US. But as a rule I am suspicious if a breeder is charging below or above the expected range for a breed in my region. I don't necessarily write them off completely but it would definately make me ask some additional questions.

One example is of a family member of mine who was looking into a breed that goes for roughly 1500 to 2500 euro from a good breeder. But then she spoke to a breeder who wanted 5000 euro for a non-breeding dog. On further questioning the breeder charged that because they were feeding some 'special' raw food and giving some supplements. As far as I am concerned that is no reason for doubling the price and I would run away from a breeder like that.

I am on a waiting list for a miniature poodle, my breeder charges on the higher range of what is normal in the region. But it is still within the expected range and the breeder does additional health tests, breeds very infrequently and titles her dogs. So I feel that the slightly higher price is justified. If she was charging a few hundred euro above the other show breeders just because of a few additional health tests then I would probably have hesitated a bit though.
 

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Just at the moment puppy prices in the UK are crazy - people were desperate to get a dog during lockdown and the BYB in particular have responded by hiking prices to whatever the market will bear, often two or three times what they could have charged 6 months ago. Reputable breeders are in a quandary - if they have pups not already covered by waiting lists, they don't want to advertise them at the usual price for fear people will think there must be something wrong, that it is so much lower, but nor do they want to profiteer.
 
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Just at the moment puppy prices in the UK are crazy - people were desperate to get a dog during lockdown and the BYB in particular have responded by hiking prices to whatever the market will bear, often two or three times what they could have charged 6 months ago. Reputable breeders are in a quandary - if they have pups not already covered by waiting lists, they don't want to advertise them at the usual price for fear people will think there must be something wrong, that it is so much lower, but nor do they want to profiteer.
Yeah one breeder that I talked to had one silver mini puppy available and had recieved over 30 applications...

If I were a breeder right now I would keep the prices the same unless my expenses had increased. Thats one of the things that I like about reputable breeders, they dont respond to market pressures or fluctuations.

A puppy born in May is the same quality as the one who was born in October. I guess they will just have to try and answer peoples questions and explain why everyone elses prices have inflated but theirs.

I hate seeing pet bubbles, there is going to be so much irresponsible breeding now. With people out of work and either looking for a companion or a quick way of making money. I know that shelters are rather empty right now but I hope that they are taking the time to stock up and secure income streams like donations. Because in a few months or a year you are going to have an awful combination of reduced donations due to the economic downturn and an influx of quarantine puppies who are now unsocialised adolescents riddled with seperation anxiety...
 

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It most likely has to do with location. I live in socal and most of the prices here for poodles are $2500-3000, but if you look just a bit north their more reasonable at $1800-2500. It doesn't make much of a difference to me though, since shipping would be around $500 anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Those are valid points to consider. @Raindrops @Rose n Poos

I don't think I've looked as far as grandparents of the puppies for health testing. I can see if all of that checks out, $3000 would be worth it. I'm not gonna lie, I don't see myself paying that much for a pup if it has something to do with location unless that breeder is highly recommended.

@curlflooffan I cannot imagine dealing with inflation prices right now. But I also feel like that's a red flag? I understand the covid situation is making everyone puppy crazy, but I personally don't think the price should increase for a companion. But that's just me.

@vanydog I live on the east coast and many are reasonable, there were just a few that seemed a bit higher. I think I was also looking at breeders in California as well, not to buy but out of curiosity.
 

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We got two Standard Poodles from an amazing AKC breeder in NY. They were both below the $1800 mentioned and are the best dogs we have ever had (just as family pets). They are raised in a loving home and very well cared for.
 
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