Poodle Forum banner

161 - 170 of 170 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,232 Posts
Discussion Starter #161
Thanks VQ - Poppy is getting Denamarin (SAM-e and silybin) - it is prescription only in the UK, and she was started on it immediately. The antibiotic - Claviseptin - runs out in a few days, and won't be continued. She is also taking Destolit to thin the bile, and Prednidale (steroid), plus a Vetzyme B plus E with zinc to plug the nutritional gaps in her chicken and egg porridge. The chicken treats I made yesterday are very popular, and I cooked and froze a tray of chicken chunks for medicnal purposes at the same time.

Meal times are getting complicated though - four different diets to cater for and keep track of! It used to be so simple - the meat came complete with offal and ground bone in the correct proportions, and I cooked a mix of veg, adding it to the dogs' half and some of the stock to the cats'. But seeing them happy and well fed is more than worth the effort - even worth the penetrating pong of Tilly-cat's special renal food!
 
  • Like
Reactions: kontiki

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Hi, I am sorry to hear about Poppy.
Did your vet suggest adding yogurt to her diet?

People want to believe that commercial dog food is nutritious and healthy, but it simply is convenient, and it is cooked at such a high temp that the added vitamins are pretty much
all that remains of nutrition. I do keep kibble in the house, like I keep potato chips- it is snack food.

To maintain a healthy digestive system you do not need to feed your dog from a can or a bag. If parasites are not present, see if Poppy will take a spoonful of organic greek yogurt.
Noodle loves it and has it everyday.
Another boon to a sturdy digestive system is squash and sweet potatoes. Some people feed canned pumpkin but it is also cooked at very high temps, so I do fresh.
Dog food is cooked at an extremely high temp, the nutrition from commercial dog foods comes basically from the added vitamins. For that you can start her on a multi.

I roast squash, I cut it in half- clean out the seeds, place it face down on a baking tray (no oil) and bake it at 350 degrees until the skin is coming off.
I save bones and make bone broth, which smells real awful but is beloved by my dogs. I use a crock pot and you basically cook everything out of the bones for several days, the bones become soft
and you strain them out leaving behind a mineral dense broth that your dog will love. Some dogs are sensitive to carrots, mine is- so I cut them up and saute them in flaxseed oil (which has the same benefits as fish oil without the smell). I offer white rice, oatmeal- with broth and squash daily.

But the main focus on a dogs diet is protein. I started my poodle on raw meaty bones very young, she eats lamb necks, turkey necks, chicken backs, any non weight bearing bones. This helps her digestion by creating enzymes in her saliva for digestion and it cleans her teeth. It can be messy, and I feed them in their kennel on a towel that I can remove before disinfecting the kennel. You also need to wash their face and hands just like your kids.

But basically I cook her meat, and I cut it up, remove excess fat. She can basically eat any protein we do, so for dinner she has what we have minus the seasoning.
Tumeric is very good for dogs and good for health, so is coconut oil.
I am fortunate to have a supermarket that marks down meat regularly and I fill my freezer. The thing is, commercial dog food is expensive and it is convenient but it isn't
really much different than feeding your human children cereal for every meal. It is time consuming to cook natural food for a dog and when you have multiple dogs it gets even more so, but if you start doing it, (and remember the multi vitamin), your dog will have a varied diet and healthy stool, her teeth will be cleaner and you will have a very easy time cleaning up your yard.

I try to keep her food cost at under $1 per LB, and I specifically shop for organic or Perdue regular.
We have a local farm that offers a lot of veal and lamb- those bones are marrow dense and soft. Chicken livers I have found are a favorite but you must use sparingly.
Chicken hearts as well. Go lightly on the offal- no more than 10% of her overall diet. The packet you find inside a chicken is a very healthy treat.
Make sure to cut up gizzards. Raw pork necks are nice though there is a portion of the bone that is left over. I throw that in her bone broth.

She generally starts her day with yogurt, oatmeal, squash or potato, and ends it with bone broth, rice, and protein. I leave kibble in her dish, and occassionally
I will hear her grab a mouthful, and even more rarely, she may clean that bowl.

I will keep Poppy in my thoughts, I hope you try the yogurt and the squash- even if it is just for right now. I'm sure your vet will agree.

Best Wishes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,232 Posts
Discussion Starter #164
Thanks TF - I have been cooking for all my animals for many years, basing their diet on 80% muscle, 10% offal, 10% ground bone, with varied vegetables and eggs and oily fish occasionally, but therapeutic diets take a little more care. Poppy needs low fat, reasonably high low-purine protein, rather more zinc, B vitamins and vitamin E than usual, and controlled copper, vitamin A and D (so no liver). The renal diet for Tilly is pretty straight-forward (low phosphate, medium protein) but she decided she didn't much like the home cooked version, or most of the commercial ones I tried - eventually I found one she will eat if it is served in small, frequent portions, and we are sticking with it for now. So now I am cooking three different recipes, and serving various foods to four animals up to 5 times a day, plus assorted medicines, treats, supplements...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,232 Posts
Discussion Starter #166
Thanks TF - I have been cooking for all my animals for many years, basing their diet on 80% muscle, 10% offal, 10% ground bone, with varied vegetables and eggs and oily fish occasionally, but therapeutic diets take a little more care. Poppy needs low fat, reasonably high low-purine protein, rather more zinc, B vitamins and vitamin E than usual, and controlled copper, vitamin A and D (so no liver). The renal diet for Tilly is pretty straight-forward (low phosphate, medium protein) but she decided she didn't much like the home cooked version, or most of the commercial ones I tried - eventually I found one she will eat if it is served in small, frequent portions, and we are sticking with it for now. So now I am cooking three different recipes, and serving various foods to four animals up to 5 times a day, plus assorted medicines, treats, supplements...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Sorry Poppy isn't quite herself yet The only thing I can share is what went with my cairn terrier and I think I have already. We have determined she has IBS and part of her intestine wall has thickened. She cannot tolerate anything other than soft food which includes softening her kibble. The only treat she can tolerate is instincts toppers, she only gets about 2-3 a day. I hope you find what works for Poppy. I'd probably do as your doing and just keep her on a bland diet for another 5-7 days while her digestive tract continues to heal. Maybe just boiled chicken & rice?
My Lagotto has just been diagnosed with something similar - a thickened intestinal wall. This has caused severe inflammation in this region, and he is now on a course of steroids to encourage him to be hungry enough to want to eat (without fear of vomiting), and the food in turn is encouraging him to drink more liquids (he is a notoriously bad drinker!). The vet also recommended Royal Canin HypoAllergenic to help with the inflammation. I substitute this with wet Kiwi Kitchens or Ziwi Peak for a more natural diet - not being a fan of commercial dry kibble, particularly vet prescribed diets. Yes, it costs us a fortune including this into his meal plan, but I know that my boy is getting more nourishment than a commercial kibble can provide. He had lost an enormous amount of weight for a medium size dog, so to see him happily eat his food again with no problems, fills me with happiness. Heather
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Poppy was recovering well from her bout of bloody diarrhoea and vomiting 10 days ago, but since finishing the metrodinazole at the weekend she has started vomiting a few hours after meals, and is obviously uncomfortable and not herself. I have been feeding her Royal Canin gastro sensitivity, which she loved and which rapidly stopped the diarrhoea and got her back to Perfect Poos (including one yesterday morning), but after 48 hours of throwing up most meals she decided she didn't want to eat it, although she was very keen to have something else. I added a tiny bit of cooked chicken to a small spoonful of RC, and she ate it all. Part of me thinks it might be better to starve her, but current advice is that the digestive system recovers more quickly if it is kept gently working with frequent small, bland meals. She is getting a Zitac dose every day to reduce acid, is drinking well, and has not lost any weight. It does not hurt her to rub her tummy, but she is showing signs of nausea and discomfort.

My vet thinks it will settle down as her digestive system recovers - the metrodinazole has a calming effect as well as being an AB, which may explain why she was so much more comfortable while taking it. If she doesn't pick up be tomorrow I will make a vet appointment. My anxieties immediately jump to worst case scenarios - cancer? Addisons? Has anyone else experienced this sort of thing? She has had minor gastric upsets before, and is prone to acid tummy, but never anything like this.
I’m so sorry to hear about Poppy. There are so many things that can cause vomiting. I’ve always taken in rescue dogs, and have had three types of digestive issues.The first was a chihuahua puppy that had an AV shunt, in which the food from the stomache bypasses the liver for detoxification. There is a surgery for this but chihuahua s don’t do well they have a high fatality. Larger dogs do well. The alternative was to put her on a low protein diet and check her liver enzymes periodically or when she was symptomatic and this worked well.another puppy, a Doberman pinscher, had pancreatic enzyme insufficiency and we used a product called NUPRO GOLD. It has vitamins as well as digestive enzymes and can be added to the food dry or mixed with warm water to make a gravy. It’s inexpensive $45 for a 5 lb container and the amount given depends on the dogs wt. he had bloody diarrhea and vomiting and this stopped it immediately. The third dog, Martini the standard poodle, I just adopted last month. She came to me on Hills digestive care which is prescription food.I went through her medical records from 2 previous owners and saw she was tested for everything under the sun. She had been given anti emetics,acid blockers. Ther was no diagnosis however. The foster said she both previous homes she was stressed by small children or other dogs. After consulting with my vet I weened her off the hills diet and started American journey with NUPRO GOLD. I also had to deworm her for hook worms. She loves the NUPRO and she has gained 3 lbs and looks great and has no further vomiting or diarrhea. I love this product and gave it to my healthy dogs as well. I hope this helps. I hope Poppy gets better soon. 💕
 
161 - 170 of 170 Posts
Top