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We are considering purchasing a male toy poodle from a breeder close to our home in Texas. We have been Yorkie parents for about 15 years.
I have been reading about toy poodles and what the requirements such as mental stimulation, exercise etc.
So. my question to you poodle parents out there is: How much mental stimulation, human interaction and exercise do they really need? The book I am reading is a bit intimidating. It says toy poodles require lots of human interaction and mental stimulation otherwise they can become destructive, neurotic etc.
We are both in our 60's but we are pretty active. We walk our Yorkie twice a day. She is six years old and weighs about 6 pounds. We are looking for a puppy as we feel Abby would be more accepting of a puppy than a full grown dog plus she is a bit on the shy and quiet side.
I know they are extremely intelligent and very sensitive. We just want to make sure this breed is good for us.
Appreciate any comments or help you can give us in deciding if this breed is for us.
 

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Welcome to PF!

So about your question, I will try to answer your question as best I can, but I have only ever had standards.
Poodles are people dogs, so I would not leave them alone everyday for more than 3 or 4 ours on a routine basis, especially when they are puppies. When it comes to mental stimulation in my opinion all poodles need to have at least the basics such as sit, down, knowing their name, come, things like that. They really need a task, like being with you during the day, they tend to adapt much better that way. If they know commands you can make it into a fun game that not only stimulates their brain but also uses their energy. That being said, they can adapt to not having a ton of exercise once they are a bit older and potty trained. Other than that they are pretty easy once they finish growing up.

I hope this helps.
 

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Will you be home with your dog most days? EV's right, poodles really don't like being left alone too long.

Will someone interact with him as needed? Our guy likes to sit with his head on someone's knee while we read or watch TV. We spend a few minutes each day reviewing training, and if he gets too bored, we give him a dog puzzle or his fly pole.

We've had setters, terriers, and spaniels in the past. The poodle and Aussie Terrier were the most people-needy.

If I were you, I'd just move on to a different book. ; )
 

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I think poodles are perfect for people who really like to share their life with a dog. Peggy watches me do laundry, studies me as I make dinner, loves learning what the toilet brush and other assorted gadgets do, etc.

My last girl (half miniature poodle) truly blossomed when she started coming to work with me every day. Before that, she expressed her aimlessness in myriad ways, all of which could've been called "training issues" but were really just boredom and loneliness. And no, having a dog buddy didn't help. She wanted a purpose and her person. Once she had those things, she was an absolute dream.

Exercise for a toy poodle should be very doable for you, thanks to those little legs. Your current walking schedule (with ample freedom for sniffing) sounds good, assuming there's also some time for off-leash frolics and zoomies. Your poodle's need for these can vary from day to day.

When you're not walking your yorkie, does she accompany you places? Do you enjoy doing dog-friendly activities? Do you think of your dog as a family member? And is the energy in your household generally calm and positive?

If so, I think a poodle would be a lovely addition. :) And we'll all be here to help you!
 

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I’ve had both yorkies and poodles. I think your lifestyle is perfect for a toy (I have two). Yorkies are a lot bolder than poodles, and poodles are a lot more sensitive than yorkies. You should never raise your voice at a toy poodle. It’s just not necessary for them to understand and it will make them fear you.

I’m not very active for health reasons, so having two dogs, they play a lot together. Yours will too, probably.

Toys (real toys), don’t need that much exercise. A walk once a day is good, two is a bonus, but not a must. Be careful not to get a miniature/toy mix if you want a calmer, less exercise needy dog. Miniatures are a whole different game (that’s my personal experience, some people will say otherwise).
 

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Welcome:)

My miniature poodle loves his "cat flirt toy" that has been adapted for a dog. I removed the feather toy that came with the flirt pole and tied my pup's squeaky, stuffed animal to the end. It was easy since the string was actually a loop. I simply stay in one spot and have my pup chase his toy around. At times, when he has the toy in his mouth, I give the command, "Let go" & he releases it, then it's off to the races again. In addition to moving it horizontally, I will move it vertically, so my pup needs to jump to try to get it.
 

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Hi and Welcome!

I'm a miniature poodle person but across the board, yes, poodles are smart, sensitive and very much the class clown.

With no intention of discouraging you, I recommend reading thru this thread Puppy reality
to get a feel for the trials and travails of raising a poodle puppy. I think almost every PF'er will say they're worth it all.

Yes, poodles love their people and being with them. They are smart and love learning. They are sensitive and respond much better to positive reinforcement methods.

Any puppy can become destructive, that's not breed specific. Puppies don't mean to be destructive. They don't have the same value system as humans. If it's chewable, they'll chew it. If it's doable, they'll do it -unless they are shown what is appropriate to chew or do, and what isn't. Restricting access by crating, gating, or tethering goes a long way to helping them understand what's okay because they don't have the opportunity to make the mistake, they learn what's expected without too much drama.
Any puppy can become neurotic, if they aren't given consistency and routine, and learning by positive methods. If they don't feel accepted, loved, if they don't have "solid ground" under them.

Poodle puppies get referred to as being very similar to human infants and toddlers, for good reason :).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think poodles are perfect for people who really like to share their life with a dog. Peggy watches me do laundry, studies me as I make dinner, loves learning what the toilet brush and other assorted gadgets do, etc.

My last girl (half miniature poodle) truly blossomed when she started coming to work with me every day. Before that, she expressed her aimlessness in myriad ways, all of which could've been called "training issues" but were really just boredom and loneliness. And no, having a dog buddy didn't help. She wanted a purpose and her person. Once she had those things, she was an absolute dream.

Exercise for a toy poodle should be very doable for you, thanks to those little legs. Your current walking schedule (with ample freedom for sniffing) sounds good, assuming there's also some time for off-leash frolics and zoomies. Your poodle's need for these can vary from day to day.

When you're not walking your yorkie, does she accompany you places? Do you enjoy doing dog-friendly activities? Do you think of your dog as a family member? And is the energy in your household generally calm and positive?

If so, I think a poodle would be a lovely addition. :) And we'll all be here to help you!
Yes, we think of our dogs as family members. We take our Yorkie on car rides. Our Yorkie watches TV with us. We have a nice size backyard where she likes to suntan.
My husband is a dog lover. I mean he baby talks to them.☺
 

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Hi and Welcome!

I'm a miniature poodle person but across the board, yes, poodles are smart, sensitive and very much the class clown.

With no intention of discouraging you, I recommend reading thru this thread Puppy reality
to get a feel for the trials and travails of raising a poodle puppy. I think almost every PF'er will say they're worth it all.

Yes, poodles love their people and being with them. They are smart and love learning. They are sensitive and respond much better to positive reinforcement methods.

Any puppy can become destructive, that's not breed specific. Puppies don't mean to be destructive. They don't have the same value system as humans. If it's chewable, they'll chew it. If it's doable, they'll do it -unless they are shown what is appropriate to chew or do, and what isn't. Restricting access by crating, gating, or tethering goes a long way to helping them understand what's okay because they don't have the opportunity to make the mistake, they learn what's expected without too much drama.
Any puppy can become neurotic, if they aren't given consistency and routine, and learning by positive methods. If they don't feel accepted, loved, if they don't have "solid ground" under them.

Poodle puppies get referred to as being very similar to human infants and toddlers, for good reason :).
We are planning on giving this puppy all he needs to be a healthy and thriving puppy.
We take it very seriously as they become part of our family. Reason why I wanted to hear from toy poodle parents.
I know is hard work, but in the end it is so rewarding to have a companion who loves you unconditionally.
 

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I have a standard poodle and a Yorkie in my household. The yorkie is a bit of an atypical yorkie, shy/nervous rather than bold. The biggest difference I see between the two is the need for structure and mental stimulation - the poodle is just a much smarter dog. The yorkie is perfectly content knowing very few commands. My poodle absorbs vocabulary at an astonishing rate, and needs a fair amount of communication to be happy. She likes to know what I am doing, not just follow along. She also needs a lot of training for her to be happy - obedience training is FUN and she needs to learn new tricks and practice old ones regularly. She wants to work during our games and on walks, not just mindlessly amble. Despite the size difference, our two are now great friends, though the Yorkie wishes I had got a toy or a mini instead!
Both dogs are similarly attached to their respective humans, and need similar amounts of human time to be happy.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Good to hear you have a Yorkie and a poodle. My female Abby is shy as well. Right now she is the princess of the house.
She is happy but we truly feel in the long run she will benefit from a buddy. We had a Yorkie male that I raised from puppy until he passed at age 14. He was our life. We cried lots for him. We miss having a male. My husband doesn't want another Yorkie as they are more fragile and prone to more health issues. We lost another one at 8 years old from Trachea collapse.
We hope that Abby at 6 years old will be more accepting of a puppy. I know we need to put her first in everything so she doesn't feel replaced by a puppy.
Thanks for all the input.
 

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I think 6 is a great age for welcoming a new addition.

And this made me laugh:

My poodle absorbs vocabulary at an astonishing rate, and needs a fair amount of communication to be happy. She likes to know what I am doing, not just follow along.
Because last night Peggy was driving me nuts, just flopping and sighing like a bored teen, so I emptied the dishwasher and narrated for her. She settled right onto her mat for "the show."

I think you'll love having a poodle. :) Hope you'll continue to share here as you navigate the puppy process.
 
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