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Discussion Starter #1
Which do you prefer? I see alot of you get your Poodle from a breeder but did you consider adoption as well? I got Mister at 8 months and it was great because he was already full grown, potty trained and on his way out of the chewing stage. I am thinking i will adopt an adult Spoo when im looking for my next one. I guess a puppy is a long commitment and alot of work and an already developed dog fits better into my life and personality. I jsut think there are so many out there that arent cute cuddly little pups and they need homes too.
I would like to get a Spoo pup (cutest thing on earth btw) but i just dont know about all the training and i would be heartbroken if i Mister felt left out and i got more attached to the new one more than him......
 

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I seriously considered adoption, but my main concern was making sure that whatever dog I brought into the house would get along with my cat. And not just get along, but play with him and be his pal and snuggle with him, etc., etc. Mickey had that kind of relationship with my other cat, but lost it when she died--I wanted the dog for myself, but also as a playmate for Mickey. So after much thought and consideration, I decided to get a puppy. And it has worked out beautifully, so I feel like it was the right decision for this period of our lives. Maybe in the future, if I decide to get another dog, I'll adopt a rescue.
 

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When I was looking for a poodle, I had a specific purpose in mind for the dog (showing) so I had little choice, and got a puppy.

I did get Kaden for show, and he was 1.5 when we bought him. It was soooo nice having a well trained dog!
 

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For my next dog i want a puppy for a couple reasons. I will have no problem in the future adopting an adult dog/cat. I want a clean slate with this puppy to train how i want to do what i want. I want to do alot of different sports, so i want a dog that can handle that. Not one with potential phobias to things i want to try (and other reasons).
 

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both have bonus's. . .

puppy- you (hopefully) know the history- know the quality of dog (IE hip's genetic issues etc). Your able to make the dog yourself you know? the issues it gets tend to be issues you cause... not fro history unknown. Downside? Potty breaks. not able to leave it home all day, teething etc.

adult rescue- hopefully no house breaking- and if there is- it tends to go pretty quickly. but there can be health and behavoir rescues you don't know about. If it's coming from a foster home type rescue you have a better idea of behavoir
 

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I completely agree; an adult or half-grown poodle can be wonderful, especially if you bypass the coat change! ;) Plus you already know their energy level and personality, as well as some health factors.

I am, however, a puppy person and I always will be. I love being able to mold a growing puppy's personality to meld with mine. Flash adores my very intense up-close-and-personal brand of affection, where an adult dog might not ever be comfortable with that level of space invasion. And I especially love how fabulously good he is for grooming. ;)
 

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My Dh didn't want a rescue b/c of our kids and his concern over an 'unknown' past. Plus he wanted as many years as possible with a dog. He brought me around b/c I also realized that my kids were pretty fearful of bigger dogs and this way they could bond with our dog during the, very short time, she was smaller than they are. LOL.

In the future I would consider an older puppy or young adult, but for now our hands are full!
 

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I wanted a young adult when Paris came along. Actually it was 100% perfect how I got Paris, cos I wasn't even considering having a poodle until my terrier had passed on due to her issues with strange dogs (and the whole intro thing with another adult dog was gonna take too much of my time and be a massive stress for many many months!) but of course Paris came along at 12 months old, and over the following 18 months I got to know her, she got to know me, and we also had weekly intros with my terrier! Along with me being able to do training and mould her to some degree before she ever came home.... lol!
 

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I like both. I started out wanting a rescue but was very limited due to allergies in the family. I kept an eye on local shelters and Petfinder for about 6 months but nothing suitable came up. So I decided to start researching/ talking to breeders as a back up. And now it seems I will be bringing home a puppy. I like the idea of a puppy who I can socialize and raise in the way I want. However, I really did like the idea of an already housetrained dog who can hold his bladder as I live 12 floors up! It just wasn't meant to be. The funny (ironic?) thing is that I hopped on Petfinder yesterday and there sat a black mini poodle, just exactly what I was looking for. But now I am pretty committed to getting a puppy, so he will have to go somewhere else.

I guess it's a blessing in a way that I live in a dog loving city. So any small low shedding dogs that go into a shelter or rescue and don't have major temperament issues get snapped up very quickly. It's competitive to get one!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I lucked out when i got Mister, he didnt have ANY past issues. He was already trained to go off leasha nd knew sit and lay down. He had already been to groomers and was a good boy about it. In my next dog and i am considering a rescue just like him. If it had huge issues i wont want to work threw them. I want a stable adult dog who needs a home not all rescue dogs have issues. They usually had owners who got rid of them because they moved or something lame like that.
 

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I always wanted a puppy so that I can train it "my way" and also give it the best possible start with good nutrition and correct vaccination.

I think that rescue always needs some serious work that not necessarily will end up successfully : (, and I do not think I am "equipped" emotionally to deal with a seriously sick dog and definitely would not like to deal with temperamental problems "by choice".

Rehoming is another matter - would definitely consider that for a VERY young dog that is healthy and good natured.

Also, at one point I was offered a show quality male 6 mos old - and really was interested in it since it was house-broken, but than breeder got sick and than became all weird :wacko: Some days I wonder if THAT dog needs a rescue, actually :rolffleyes:

Oh well... Puppy it is ;)
 

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I've had both, and it was SOO nice getting an adult dog that I may never get a puppy again! However, I just love those little puppy bellies and puppy breath and sigh...they are just so stinkin cute!!!

My next dog will likely not be a poodle (I must be crazy) because I want a dog that I can do disc dog stuff with, so I'm looking into a border collie or border collie mix. If I can rescue a young dog that meets my criteria I will go that route, but if not, I will get a pup because I want to ensure it has good joints and drive.
 

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I decided to get a puppy because of bonding. I have always been a cat person, Ivan will be my first dog and it would be easier to bond with a dog if it is younger and also that it is a clean slate. Also me and my bf are getting Ivan together and we aren't planing to have kids so its my chance at some kinda motherhood.
 

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We got Cricket at 6 months, and we got Clover at 2 months. If we ever get another spoo in the future, I would go with an older puppy/young adult vs. a very young puppy. When we got Cricket she was almost completely housetrained--I basically just had to show her where I wanted her to go. She was also a bit more calmed down, and was very receptive to learning. She was so much easier to handle and train. Not that Clover is hard or anything, but a young puppy is just so much more time consuming (and messy! :))
 

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17 years ago our hearts were broken by a rescue. We loved him very much but went through several very tough years wtih him. He was so unpredictable, it was an incredible and heart wrenching journey. He had to be put to sleep shortly after our son was born.

After that, predictability was very important with a young one in the house. Not only that, but we seriously needed a break from challenging. When we got Nat and the GR it was so nice to just enjoy our time with the dogs and not be on guard all the time.

Now that our son is older we may consider doing a rescue again someday. Probably not while Nat is around, he's small and old.. not the fierce little ruler of the house he used to be.(Sorry Nat LOL!)

We got Jasper at 3 months. On one hand the longer bladder control was nice ;), but I kind of missed getting to go through that snuggly little 8 week old stage. Although I wouldn't mind getting a pup that was around the 6-8 month'ish stage. Mostly potty trained and through teething :D.
 

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I would love to adopt, but I don't think that I will be able to while I have my lab.
He has some neurological issues with both his cerebrum and cerebellum that make him walk weird. His body language tends to set other dogs off and there have been quite a few fights. Because of this he has a fear aggression towards any dog that he feels is threatening to him.
I needed a young (Ivy, at 5 months was older that I was wanting), submissive dog so that Elliot wouldn't feel threatened and so the new dog would grow up being used to E's body language.
 

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Seeing as I want a standard poodle for our next addition, I will again go the puppy route. I've got 4 other dogs (addition won't be for a few years LOL) and some that are kinda wary around large dogs. And I'd look for one around 8ish weeks.

On the other hand, if I change my mind about a spoo (yeah right) or got a different breed I'd look for an older puppy. I got the poodles when they were around 4 months and it was sooo nice not having to go through the biting phase. And they could hold it in just a little bit longer than a littler puppy.
 

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I have only had Australian Shepherd puppies. They are without a doubt the cutest puppies of any breed until they are about 4 months old. Then they are about the ugliest until they mature. I have also adopted adult Aussies and now I just don't think two months of really cute puppy is worth the trouble. All of the older dogs ever I took in were so obviously grateful for a good loving home that they would have done anything to please.

Almost all of my fosters have been poodles and poodle mixes, most around 9 months (that's when most owners have grown tired of their no longer cute but still wild puppy). I'm still dealing with housetraining and chewing but it's much easier than with the really young puppies. Even the most abused and neglected ones that I had developed into wonderful pets. I will give credit to Hoot - he truly is a wonderful fosterer. There have been many touching moments as he tries to reassure and wlecome scared newcomers.
 

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When I was looking for a poodle, I wanted to go with a great breeder so I knew the background and history of the dog. But I wanted an older puppy (6 months to 12 months) to skip all the work of a puppy. The last dog I had, I got him at 8 weeks and boy do I remember the sleepless nights.

I was hoping for a pup that was kept for show, but didn't work out, or a return to the breeder possibly. A breeder I knew offered me his retired show dog, but he's 7 years old and I wanted more time with my dog.

After I found the breeder I liked, it seemed like we were going to have to go the puppy route, but at least Jager was 4 months when we brought him home, so he could sleep through the night, which was great. Yes, it's more challenging to have a puppy, but we love him so much and it's worth the extra work.
 

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I've done it both ways We adopted Sport when he was 4 and he moved in like a dream dog and like he'd always been here and was so very grateful. I loved him to death. He walked at a heel without a leash knew basic commands and became my velcro dog. But on the other hand I would still love to know about his past and what made him have a few of his personality quirks. I'd have loved to be able to see pics of him when he was a puppy and wished I could have seen him grow. Not to mention not knowing about any health problems in his background was scary!!

Its been fun watching the girls grow up but much messier. They sure didn't come housebroken and certainly loved to chew. The coat change thing is a drag!! However there is nothing like watching your kids playing with a puppy and watching them grow. They are so sweet. Especially when they fall asleep on your lap. I love them both.

Personally I think you love your dog however they came into your home becomes not too important. If I were to get another dog I think it would be a puppy because knowing their family health background is important to me. That said since Sport has passed away I've had to restrain myself many times from calling up to follow up on a adult spoo that needed a new home.

However I've promised the kids that after Betty Jo and Jenny get old enough and are tested and have a litter we will keep one of the puppies (not necessarily from the first litter though). I think it would be incredible to have a dog that was the daughter of one of your dogs. Not to mention it must be amazing to live with a dog that you help bring into the world and has been in your home its entire life.
 
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