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You mentioned hypoallergenic being important. As someone with asthma and allergies let me share my experience. Hypoallergenic dogs are just low shedding, they do better in many cases for people with allergies but it doesn't mean no allergies at all. I am generally horrible allergy-wise with most breeds, Shepherds and Huskies especially set my asthma off like crazy. I did some allergy testing and interacting with poodles and I still have reactions, but they are mild and are controlled by a Claritin. No asthma reactions to my spoo. But I have heard stories from others experiencing anything from no reactions to full blown allergic and asthmatic reactions to poodles. So I would make sure if you have someone with allergies in the household to test themselves around poodles first. If the allergies are severe, go to an allergist first. More in-depth testing can be done. The reactions (or lack of) to poodles seem to be very person specific.
 

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It sounds like you’ve thought this out and have a pretty good idea of what you’re getting into. I’ve been meaning to chime in for a while as I’m in a similar situation as you. Having a 5yo son is exactly why I went with a SPOO. IMHO, SPOOs offer the right balance of long-term health, temperament, and athleticism; plus, the robustness to stand up to an active young boy without the constant fear of accidental injury – not to mention the no shedding part. Yes, Happy was jumpy and bite-y in the beginning – and that led to a few tears. Now that she’s nearly 7mo she learned to dial it back and all is good. It’s usually my son who ratchets up the intensity. Happy is terrific with children and loves them. We have a steady flow of kids 1.5 through 13yo through our back yard and Happy is a hit with all of them. Of course, close supervision is required to keep things from getting out of control, but it appears you’re more than prepared for that.

There’s one issue I want to highlight that hasn’t been addressed in previous posts. As you already know, young kids demand a lot of attention - so does a an intelligent and energetic SPOO. There are times when I get home from work where it’s an all-out competition for my attention - it can be exhausting. In the end, Happy is wonderful addition to our family and I’m sure experience the same. Congratulations on your soon to be new puppy. Please post pics when she comes home. - Brian
 

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Discussion Starter #23
You mentioned hypoallergenic being important. As someone with asthma and allergies let me share my experience. Hypoallergenic dogs are just low shedding, they do better in many cases for people with allergies but it doesn't mean no allergies at all. I am generally horrible allergy-wise with most breeds, Shepherds and Huskies especially set my asthma off like crazy. I did some allergy testing and interacting with poodles and I still have reactions, but they are mild and are controlled by a Claritin. No asthma reactions to my spoo. But I have heard stories from others experiencing anything from no reactions to full blown allergic and asthmatic reactions to poodles. So I would make sure if you have someone with allergies in the household to test themselves around poodles first. If the allergies are severe, go to an allergist first. More in-depth testing can be done. The reactions (or lack of) to poodles seem to be very person specific.
No one in our household has allergies to pets, we actually have a cat haha I just really meant we want a low shedding dog and being hypoallergenic is great too, for no specific reason really lol
 

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It sounds like you’ve thought this out and have a pretty good idea of what you’re getting into. I’ve been meaning to chime in for a while as I’m in a similar situation as you. Having a 5yo son is exactly why I went with a SPOO. IMHO, SPOOs offer the right balance of long-term health, temperament, and athleticism; plus, the robustness to stand up to an active young boy without the constant fear of accidental injury – not to mention the no shedding part. Yes, Happy was jumpy and bite-y in the beginning – and that lead to a few tears. Now that she’s nearly 7mo she learned to dial it back and all is good. It’s usually my son who ratchets up the intensity. Happy is terrific with children and loves them. We have a steady flow of kid 1.5 through 13yo through our back yard and Happy is a hit with all of them. Of course, close supervision is required to keep things from getting out of control, but it appears you’re more than prepared for that.

There’s one issue I want to highlight that hasn’t been addressed in previous posts. As you already know, young kids demand a lot of attention - so does a an intelligent and energetic SPOO. There are times when I get home from work where it’s an all-out competition for my attention - it can be exhausting. In the end, Happy is wonderful addition to our family and I’m sure experience the same. Congratulations on your soon to be new puppy. Please post pics when she comes home. - Brian
Aww that's awesome and exactly what I'm excited for 😍 definitely will be supervising vigilantly, thankfully our house is extremely open concept haha. Literally out kitchen, dining room living room and hallway are all like one giant open space 🤣 but like I said I will be gating our bedroom door and if the kids are going a bit nuts or the dog I will place him in there for everyone to cool down. He will still be able to see everyone through the door gate.

I have a feeling mornings are evening when I go get the girls at daycare are going to be a little more hectic with the puppy and definitely am not negligent of that idea. Thankfully as I've mentioned before I do work from home and it's very slow pace where I am not constantly glued to my desk so I'll have time on my lunch hour, breaks and inbetween to spend time with him and work on training without the kids around.

I'll definitely be posting pictures of him!! 😁❤
She's recently sent me these by email
 

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She showed me the health testing of the parents and is also giving me a health guarantee of two years for the pup accompanied by health testing. Like I said, I think I just got lucky 🤷🏼‍♀️ she's a newer breeder so isn't set up like long time breeders. She bought her dogs from reputable breeders in the US.
Even litters from brand new breeders are in demand right now, and likely to be at least tentatively spoken for before the breeding even happens, so you definitely got lucky!!

Do you have OFA links? I was recently researching a local breeder and one of our members was super helpful, walking me through the OFA results. I'm still fairly new to purebred poodles and honestly don't know what I'd do without Poodle Forum. I feel like I'm reading another language sometimes.
 

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Even litters from brand new breeders are in demand right now, and likely to be at least tentatively spoken for before the breeding even happens, so you definitely got lucky!!

Do you have OFA links? I was recently researching a local breeder and one of our members was super helpful, walking me through the OFA results. I'm still fairly new to purebred poodles and honestly don't know what I'd do without Poodle Forum. I feel like I'm reading another language sometimes.
No I do not have any OFA links.

Yes it is a whole world in itself hahah
 

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Yes, be sure to really check on the health tests of the parents. And of course OFA. Are all of the tests there that need to be? Can you also get them for back a generation? How is the behavior of the mother?

It is good you are working from home. You might want to tether your new pup to you for awhile. I was so glad I had my kitchen in it's own room so I could put baby gates on the doors and have a place where he could be alone for awhile that was easily cleanable and nothing to chew up or pee and poo on. Just a crate is too small.
How would you do something like that with only one big area?

You are going to be super busy for a year or two:) Have you found an excellent trainer ahead of time? Socializing during COVID can be very difficult. Do you have a plan for that?
 

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I guess I got really lucky! I did see them on video chat so I know it's real haha they also come with a health guarantee which is great. The puppies are way too tiny to tell any signs of personality yet but I've asked to come see him at around 6/7 weeks to see how he is.

Yes I know when they get to their almost adult size that they don't sleep as much, which is why I want to be strict on crate training (strict as in make it work haha).

I think this forum will also be a godsend 😅
hi!
I am a senior citizen. A very healthy, active senior citizen. I have had dogs all my life. You name the breed, and I have probably had one...lol. Also, I have raised and trained quarter horses, so I am used to large animals.
I always wanted a standard poodle....I just love poodles. I have had toys and miniatures. 5 years ago, I purchased a standard. Got her when she was 10 weeks old. Piper today is the love of my life. My husbands very best friend. She is sweet, loving, gentle, smart, everything you have heard about the standards. I have groomed dogs for 50 years, and she is so quiet and gentle to groom.
Ok, now here is the other side of the coin....when she was young (up until 2 yrs. old), she could be a handful. She was very energetic, would get the “zoomies” liked to run and run around. Fortunately, we had a 1/2 acre fenced yard where she could run it off. She would get excited and liked to jump on people, grab clothing, knock over lamps,etc. I talked to our vet who has standards of his own, and asked him when she would come out of this stage....he laughed and said usually they settle down pretty well by the time they hit 3...so, from the time she was a puppy, until today, I took the time and effort to train, train, and train her.
Hi everyone! Nice to meet you all :)

My name is Lianne, I have been lurking around here for a bit and also doing plenty of research. I have fallen in love with Poodles and potentially will be adopting a puppy in December. We are a young active family, we live in the woods on a hug lot with a beautiful backyard and even front yard.

We have two daughters ages 4 and 2 1/2. My 4 year old is very calm and responsible for the most part and my youngest for her age is as well. I really have been wanting a poodle, they seem like SUCH a magnificent breed and I seem to read a lot of great things about them with young kids.

What are you thoughts on getting a puppy poodle (standard poodle) while having two young kids?

I really want to crate train and have a seperate room for the dog to go to if ever it gets overly excited when its over tired and also a place to go to if ever our girls are having a fit/tantrum. A place I can put the dog when that happens.

Thoughts? Ideas? Suggestions?
Am I nuts? Hahaha
 

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hi!
I am a senior citizen. A very healthy, active senior citizen. I have had dogs all my life. You name the breed, and I have probably had one...lol. Also, I have raised and trained quarter horses, so I am used to large animals.
I always wanted a standard poodle....I just love poodles. I have had toys and miniatures. 5 years ago, I purchased a standard. Got her when she was 10 weeks old. Piper today is the love of my life. My husbands very best friend. She is sweet, loving, gentle, smart, everything you have heard about the standards. I have groomed dogs for 50 years, and she is so quiet and gentle to groom.
Ok, now here is the other side of the coin....when she was young (up until 2 yrs. old), she could be a handful. She was very energetic, would get the “zoomies” liked to run and run around. Fortunately, we had a 1/2 acre fenced yard where she could run it off. She would get excited and liked to jump on people, grab clothing, knock over lamps,etc. I talked to our vet who has standards of his own, and asked him when she would come out of this stage....he laughed and said usually they settle down pretty well by the time they hit 3...so, from the time she was a puppy, until today, I took the time and effort to train, train, and train her.
Aww thank you for your reply! :)

Yesss my dad got a puppy Labradoodle 4 years ago and since she turned 2 that's also when she's calmed down quite a bit. Good luck to us for the first 2 years 😅😂👌

I know I'm definitely going to have my hands full, thankfully I will be crate training and the crate will also be in a room that has a door gate so that if ever he needs to go somewhere separate from my girls he can go in there without me having to put him in his crate.

We have a large private backyard too which is going to be great, we live in the woods and love to take walks in our neighborhood too. I can't wait!
 

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Yes, be sure to really check on the health tests of the parents. And of course OFA. Are all of the tests there that need to be? Can you also get them for back a generation? How is the behavior of the mother?

It is good you are working from home. You might want to tether your new pup to you for awhile. I was so glad I had my kitchen in it's own room so I could put baby gates on the doors and have a place where he could be alone for awhile that was easily cleanable and nothing to chew up or pee and poo on. Just a crate is too small.
How would you do something like that with only one big area?

You are going to be super busy for a year or two:) Have you found an excellent trainer ahead of time? Socializing during COVID can be very difficult. Do you have a plan for that?
Yes and yes and I will be seeing the mother in person when I go pick him up. She told me the mom and dad have amazing temperaments very laid back and happy :)

I will actually be putting the crate in our bedroom and also putting a doggy gate on our door as well , I think I wrote that somewhere before too. So if he needs a break from the girls or if my girls need a break from him it's going to be his place to be in for that so that I don't have to always crate him in those situations. :)

I am not finding a training at all, good luck to me I'll be doing it all haha I downloaded this amazing puppy training app that has amazing reviews and I've also been doing lots of doggy homework on toilet training and basic commands for small pups.

As for socialization, in our neighborhood there are many dogs around so it'll be easy that way. We also have some dark parks we'll bring him to in the summer :)
 

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Follow this as closely as possible and you will be so glad you did:



Also available online for free:





I've got the book version and have read it with my last three dogs, learning something new each time. It's excellent advice for all puppies, but especially poodles.
 

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Hey Lianne, I really hope everything goes well for you. My family is hoping to get a Spoo in January from a breeder we contacted back in August. We're in a similar boat as you, as we have a 6-month-old at home, who would be about 8 months if/when we get this pup in January. You mentioned your kids go to daycare, so I'm sure that would really help you focus on the pooch for some extra time each day, and make it more manageable. I stay at home with our daughter, and will stay at home for as long as we live here because there is no daycare within 70 miles. Most people around here homeschool as the closest school is about 1 hour away by bus (COVID means everyone homeschools now). I too feel like I might be nuts for wanting to get a dog now, especially a puppy, but I feel the same way as you -- working through the first couple puppy and adolescent years will produce a wonderful adult dog for our family. I'd love to know more about what challenges, successes, and general experiences you have with raising a puppy with young children, as I may encounter those as well. My husband and I hope to have another child over the next few years, and I worry about being pregnant and exhausted and trying to care of a young dog and human at the same time. But then I remind myself that I've had friends and neighbors and family who have had twins, or farms full of animals, or multiple children close in age, and have raised them successfully. Please feel free to message me any time to talk kids and pups. -- Lindsey
 

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Agree with PeggytheParti ! And Ian Dunbar! "If you have your heart set on raising and training a puppy, domake sure you train yourself beforehand. Remember, it takes only a few days to ruin an otherwise perfect puppy."

My Spoo breeder said "don't let him jump on you". So I gently taught him not to do that the very first day I had him at 13 weeks. The same with barking, except when a stranger came to the door, for two or three barks. I always respond immediately if he barks, so he does not need to continue. There is no reason to have an obnoxious jumping barking dog. Or other bad habits. Listen to Ian instead of discounting him because you feel like you are being lectured. My Spoo turned into an amazing Service Dog as I had trainers like him, even though I didn't know who he was at the time:)
 

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Follow this as closely as possible and you will be so glad you did:



Also available online for free:





I've got the book version and have read it with my last three dogs, learning something new each time. It's excellent advice for all puppies, but especially poodles.
I forgot to respond to your comment but OMG I absolutely LOVED reading both of those, truly sooo helpful and really gives me an insight as to what to expect and what to do. I love love love it. Thank you so very much for sharing that with me :) grateful for that!🥰
 

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Hey Lianne, I really hope everything goes well for you. My family is hoping to get a Spoo in January from a breeder we contacted back in August. We're in a similar boat as you, as we have a 6-month-old at home, who would be about 8 months if/when we get this pup in January. You mentioned your kids go to daycare, so I'm sure that would really help you focus on the pooch for some extra time each day, and make it more manageable. I stay at home with our daughter, and will stay at home for as long as we live here because there is no daycare within 70 miles. Most people around here homeschool as the closest school is about 1 hour away by bus (COVID means everyone homeschools now). I too feel like I might be nuts for wanting to get a dog now, especially a puppy, but I feel the same way as you -- working through the first couple puppy and adolescent years will produce a wonderful adult dog for our family. I'd love to know more about what challenges, successes, and general experiences you have with raising a puppy with young children, as I may encounter those as well. My husband and I hope to have another child over the next few years, and I worry about being pregnant and exhausted and trying to care of a young dog and human at the same time. But then I remind myself that I've had friends and neighbors and family who have had twins, or farms full of animals, or multiple children close in age, and have raised them successfully. Please feel free to message me any time to talk kids and pups. -- Lindsey
Hiii ! 😊 Nice to meet you!! Honestly read both of the books Peggytheparti linked in the previous comment, it has been truly amazing reading those to know what to do and what to expect! There should be no room for error the first few months, so read that and make sure to follow it as much as you possibly can! I love that there is crate training and also having the dog in a dedicated room too with a dog gate. You really want to keep the dog confined to one area to be able to really keep an eye and to prevent any soiling and destruction other than chewing and biting on Kong's. So if the dog can be confined to one area like this while you're raising your child, I would say go for it but you will definitely be busy busy just like me hahaha it's not forever and it will pass, but the first 6 months are essential!
 

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Peggy's confinement area (an indoor exercise pen attached to her crate) looked like an actual garbage dump some days! I gave her so much to chew and shred. All her needs were safely met AND she didn't destroy anything of ours. A revelation. :)

Of course, she spent just as much time out of the pen—tethered to me or exploring the yard, at puppy class, in big box store parking lots, etc. Definitely a full-time job at first. My first posts here were almost entirely just me having nervous breakdowns. So embarrassing. But so grateful for Poodle Forum!
 

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Peggy's confinement area (an indoor exercise pen attached to her crate) looked like an actual garbage dump some days! I gave her so much to chew and shred. All her needs were safely met AND she didn't destroy anything of ours. A revelation. :)

Of course, she spent just as much time out of the pen—tethered to me or exploring the yard, at puppy class, in big box store parking lots, etc. Definitely a full-time job at first. My first posts here were almost entirely just me having nervous breakdowns. So embarrassing. But so grateful for Poodle Forum!
Aww nice!! Did you put anything other than Kong's in the pen?? I know from the books it says just Kong's but was wondering if it's possible to put more stuff lol

I honestly was just thinking about bringing him to Costco one day just infront outside and bringing a bowl of treats and asking people to give him some but to make him sit!

I'm also going to be doing a 'Meet Puppy Day's with friends and family to come by on that day, we'll install ourselves in our garage and people can come say hi make him sit and give him a treat!
 

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We gave her lots of different things to satisfy her various chewing and shredding needs—cardboard boxes, paper towel rolls, frozen veggies, etc. Kongs require less supervision, but they don't meet all of a puppy's needs, especially during teething. I find a variety of textures to be important.

Be careful with "making" puppy sit to meet people, especially somewhere like a garage where he might feel cornered, or on a leash at a busy store. You want to approach these situations in a relaxed, playful way.

For example, we went to Home Depot, but we parked ourselves well away from the entrance while I fed her treats for looking at "scary things" and then back at me. If Peggy showed interest in meeting someone, we asked the person if it was okay, and then let Peggy approach them on a loose leash. Try to coach the person if you can, asking them to ignore your puppy unless all four feet are on the ground. If your puppy's body language is loose and relaxed, you can ask for some basics, like sit, keeping the tone light and fun.

Another thing we worked on during meet 'n' greets was "Touch," where the person extends an empty hand, puppy touches it with her nose, and then gets a treat from the other hand. Poodles jump—sometimes a lot!—and this really helps with that, directing their attention to an appropriate level.

Those books provide an excellent foundation in socialization, which you can build on and adapt to poodles. Poodle puppies don't, for example, do well with repetition. If you ask for ten sits in a row, you're likely to see your puppy get "creative" and start offering up different behaviours (some of which you might not like). Or he may get extremely frustrated.

Peggy expressed her puppy frustration by barking or air snapping, and with the help of a Poodle Forum member, I realized I was antagonizing her by asking for too many sits and expecting her to hold them for too long before being rewarded. I pulled back a bit, began rewarding (e.g. tossing her toy) the moment her bum hit the floor, and the frustration disappeared. After a few weeks of that, I was able to start building duration with no issue.

I could ramble on about this stuff forever, but I'll stop now because you don't even have your little poodle yet! Your poor brain is going to be overflowing. :)
 

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My poodle hated kongs and wouldn't have anything to do with them. He is 11, and still won't, even with high value treats in them. We need to be creative!
 
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