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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone! Nice to meet you all :)

My name is Lianne, I have been lurking around here for a bit and also doing plenty of research. I have fallen in love with Poodles and potentially will be adopting a puppy in December. We are a young active family, we live in the woods on a hug lot with a beautiful backyard and even front yard.

We have two daughters ages 4 and 2 1/2. My 4 year old is very calm and responsible for the most part and my youngest for her age is as well. I really have been wanting a poodle, they seem like SUCH a magnificent breed and I seem to read a lot of great things about them with young kids.

What are you thoughts on getting a puppy poodle (standard poodle) while having two young kids?

I really want to crate train and have a seperate room for the dog to go to if ever it gets overly excited when its over tired and also a place to go to if ever our girls are having a fit/tantrum. A place I can put the dog when that happens.

Thoughts? Ideas? Suggestions?
Am I nuts? Hahaha
 

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You're not nuts. :) Poodles can make amazing family dogs. If you choose your breeder carefully, they can help match you with a puppy that has the right temperament for your household. But keep in mind—even the sweetest spoo puppies can seem awfully big and bitey! They are natural retrievers and use their mouth a lot. How would your 2-year-old do with that?
 

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You’re not nuts. I just got a spoo puppy and my kids are 3, 6, and 6. I could not have handled it when my 3 year old was 2, but he is a handful. She is a bit much for my little guy sometimes, but it’s nothing that can’t be managed by training the both of them. I love how helpful my (almost) 6 year olds are, and they would not have been at 4. Have you had dogs before? I think if so and you understand what you’re getting into, you’ll be fine.
 
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You're not nuts. :) Poodles can make amazing family dogs. If you choose your breeder carefully, they can help match you with a puppy that has the right temperament for your household. But keep in mind—even the sweetest spoo puppies can seem awfully big and bitey! They are natural retrievers and use their mouth a lot. How would your 2-year-old do with that?
Hi there 😀 thanks for saying I'm not nuts hahaha , I'm not too certain how she would react to be honest. I'd have to supervise like a hawk obviously to make sure nothing bad happens, kind of preparing myself that nips and bites will happen and to have a good talk with them that the puppy doesn't hate them or isn't mad that's just how puppies can be because they're baby dogs. I'd only want them to play with him with a stuffy in their hands pretty much at all times.

I really want to work hard on the crate training. I want it to be a safe calm place for the dog to unwind. I'll also put the crate in our bedroom and put a puppy gate at the door so that it can be a place he can play in too while also being able to see us.
 

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You’re not nuts. I just got a spoo puppy and my kids are 3, 6, and 6. I could not have handled it when my 3 year old was 2, but he is a handful. She is a bit much for my little guy sometimes, but it’s nothing that can’t be managed by training the both of them. I love how helpful my (almost) 6 year olds are, and they would not have been at 4. Have you had dogs before? I think if so and you understand what you’re getting into, you’ll be fine.
I'm probably nuts 😅 reading this hahaha
Yes I grew up with a golden retriever that we got as a puppy when I was 6. I still remember a lot of it actually. It is a lot of work. I'm not really in it for the puppy stage at all, I just know raising a dog from a puppy can form the most incredible bond and adult dog in the future.

I work from home currently which is why I really think the best time would be now.
 

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You'll be hitting some of the most challenging parts of poodle life about a year after you bring your puppy home, so be sure to look ahead to what your lifestyle will look like then. Puppies sleep 20 hours a day, but adolescents do not! (Yes, I am currently the proud and tired owner of an adolescent poodle.) And standard poodles can have quite a long adolescence.

Because of covid, there's a huge demand for puppies right now and unscrupulous breeders are capitalizing on it. Straight-up scammers, too. Unless you're already on a waitlist, December may not be realistic. Many of our members are looking ahead now to 2021 puppies.

Have you already decided on a breeder? Do they feel their puppies would be a good fit for young children, and what's their selection process like? You really want someone who does temperament testing or at least assesses the puppies through daily observation, to help make the best matches.

Poodle Forum was a lifesaver for me after I brought Peggy home. I only wish I'd found it sooner! So don't hesitate to ask lots of questions as you navigate the process.
 

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I had a kindergartner, a preschooler, and a toddler when I brought home a 12- week old cavalier king charles puppy. I did not have time to spend on a lot of dog training, but I got the potty training done and a puppy class. She was a smooth fit into our home; a beloved family member who my kids remember with very full hearts. My 9 week old poodle puppy came when I had two teenage girls in the home and it basically took all of us to care for her, and she has been in continuous training for a year- and she's still a handful! Now I chose her with the help of her breeder to do performance activities, and we hike/camp so she has drive and pep.

Here's my advice: if you get a puppy, ask the breeder for help choosing one who's temperament is right for your family. It's probably a wise choice to go with an easy keeper. If a puppy is described as "high drive" or "a pistol" just say no- it will be too much work in a home with young kids. In Covid Times it is hard to do the following, but I'll still say it: there is no replacing taking your kids to a breeder and visiting the dogs (especially the adult dogs!). I would say go visit high quality breeders of poodles, labs, goldens, and cavaliers. Poodles are the best of course, but I'm not completely convinced that they are always the best choice for families with young kids. They could be a good choice, but maybe not the best choice.

453DFD72-3077-4681-B44D-43700B77BA1C.jpeg
 

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I don't think you're crazy, but here's what goes through my mind. Raising a spoo puppy while also caring for two young kids sounds really rough. It's like having another toddler. I would definitely think through whether you want to put yourself through it. If you do feel up to the challenge, definitely find a really good breeder that will match you to a calm, easy going puppy. Poodle puppies can be incredibly mouthy (with needle teeth) and it's painful even for an adult. So there's definitely a lot of management needed with kids. But if you have a lot of free time, and you think your kids will manage well, it could work out well.
 

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I agree with others on the warnings regarding adolescence. But I think this is true for really any breed that is of a similar size as spoos. I grew up with labradors and they are a fantastic family dog but they are a handful during adolescence! the poor things have the body of an adult, mind of a puppy and lots of new exciting hormones! its a difficult time for everybody.

So yeah you are probably going to be very tired during adolescence and the dog might accidentally push over your toddler. But don't worry, my family got a St Bernard puppy when I was 2 years old and I survived, he definately pushed me over a few times by accident and ate my pacifier! 😅
 

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Poodles are a handful when in the puppy and adolescence stage. While mine had his baby teeth my clothes got torn and I had bloody arms, not necessarily from the biting, which they of course do but from he sheer joy of playing and the tooth snagging on me. I think a st poodle will be an excellent family dog but for two years you will have a ton of work. While it can be done, I don't think I could do it with two very young children. You will need the patience of a Saint.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You'll be hitting some of the most challenging parts of poodle life about a year after you bring your puppy home, so be sure to look ahead to what your lifestyle will look like then. Puppies sleep 20 hours a day, but adolescents do not! (Yes, I am currently the proud and tired owner of an adolescent poodle.) And standard poodles can have quite a long adolescence.

Because of covid, there's a huge demand for puppies right now and unscrupulous breeders are capitalizing on it. Straight-up scammers, too. Unless you're already on a waitlist, December may not be realistic. Many of our members are looking ahead now to 2021 puppies.

Have you already decided on a breeder? Do they feel their puppies would be a good fit for young children, and what's their selection process like? You really want someone who does temperament testing or at least assesses the puppies through daily observation, to help make the best matches.

Poodle Forum was a lifesaver for me after I brought Peggy home. I only wish I'd found it sooner! So don't hesitate to ask lots of questions as you navigate the process.
I guess I got really lucky! I did see them on video chat so I know it's real haha they also come with a health guarantee which is great. The puppies are way too tiny to tell any signs of personality yet but I've asked to come see him at around 6/7 weeks to see how he is.

Yes I know when they get to their almost adult size that they don't sleep as much, which is why I want to be strict on crate training (strict as in make it work haha).

I think this forum will also be a godsend 😅
 

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I had a kindergartner, a preschooler, and a toddler when I brought home a 12- week old cavalier king charles puppy. I did not have time to spend on a lot of dog training, but I got the potty training done and a puppy class. She was a smooth fit into our home; a beloved family member who my kids remember with very full hearts. My 9 week old poodle puppy came when I had two teenage girls in the home and it basically took all of us to care for her, and she has been in continuous training for a year- and she's still a handful! Now I chose her with the help of her breeder to do performance activities, and we hike/camp so she has drive and pep.

Here's my advice: if you get a puppy, ask the breeder for help choosing one who's temperament is right for your family. It's probably a wise choice to go with an easy keeper. If a puppy is described as "high drive" or "a pistol" just say no- it will be too much work in a home with young kids. In Covid Times it is hard to do the following, but I'll still say it: there is no replacing taking your kids to a breeder and visiting the dogs (especially the adult dogs!). I would say go visit high quality breeders of poodles, labs, goldens, and cavaliers. Poodles are the best of course, but I'm not completely convinced that they are always the best choice for families with young kids. They could be a good choice, but maybe not the best choice.

View attachment 471294

Wow good for you!! Haha seems like a challenge but you pushed through!

The reason we really want a poodle also is not only the personality but also the fact they are hypoallergenic and don't lose hair. Those are super important to us!

Honestly I find it all a challenge and I'm not in it for the puppy stage, I'm in it for the dog that will flourish in a few years later. I know it won't be flowers and rainbows all the time haha
 

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I agree with others on the warnings regarding adolescence. But I think this is true for really any breed that is of a similar size as spoos. I grew up with labradors and they are a fantastic family dog but they are a handful during adolescence! the poor things have the body of an adult, mind of a puppy and lots of new exciting hormones! its a difficult time for everybody.

So yeah you are probably going to be very tired during adolescence and the dog might accidentally push over your toddler. But don't worry, my family got a St Bernard puppy when I was 2 years old and I survived, he definately pushed me over a few times by accident and ate my pacifier! 😅
Oh yes those teenage doggy hormones yay 😅🤣🙈 sounds like a grand time hahaha

And wow Saint Bernards are huge dogs to have with littles!!
 

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Poodles are a handful when in the puppy and adolescence stage. While mine had his baby teeth my clothes got torn and I had bloody arms, not necessarily from the biting, which they of course do but from he sheer joy of playing and the tooth snagging on me. I think a st poodle will be an excellent family dog but for two years you will have a ton of work. While it can be done, I don't think I could do it with two very young children. You will need the patience of a Saint.

What's really taunting me more is the fact that I work from home and my job is veryyyy laid back so I have a lot of time in between work tasks that I could spend with the dog for training and such. Having two kids I have learned quite a bit about patience 😅🤣 hahaha
 

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Building on some of the advice others have posted, if you go for it, make sure you prepare your kids, especially the older one, for the reality. My daughter, who is 9, had some tears of disappointment and overwhelm when the snuggly puppy we brought home was terrorizing her in her own house. The puppy is a lot better now and my daughter has adjusted her expectations and routines, is setting boundaries and finding her own space, and adores Oona now (even when she's being a brat). But it was emotionally rough for a week or so there when she was pretty unhappy about the changes the puppy had brought, both in terms of the mouthiness/naughtiness and the attention the puppy requires.
 

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I'm probably nuts 😅 reading this hahaha
Yes I grew up with a golden retriever that we got as a puppy when I was 6. I still remember a lot of it actually. It is a lot of work. I'm not really in it for the puppy stage at all, I just know raising a dog from a puppy can form the most incredible bond and adult dog in the future.

I work from home currently which is why I really think the best time would be now.
Having a family pet as a kid is as different from raising a pet as the ‘adult in charge’ as babysitting/working in childcare is from having your own kids. It can be very rewarding, but it also can be very hard, especially if you’re doing it right. You work from home currently, is that likely to change?
 
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I guess I got really lucky! I did see them on video chat so I know it's real haha they also come with a health guarantee which is great. The puppies are way too tiny to tell any signs of personality yet but I've asked to come see him at around 6/7 weeks to see how he is.

Yes I know when they get to their almost adult size that they don't sleep as much, which is why I want to be strict on crate training (strict as in make it work haha).

I think this forum will also be a godsend 😅
I would be extra cautious for any breeder that has pups available at this time. Be extra sure that they have been fully health tested. Hip tests should have results through OFA or Pennhip. They should be able to link you to OFA health test results or at least show you the certifications. If they cannot provide test results, run run as fast as you can.

The way you talk about it sounds as if they're pairing pups with families when they are very young. Reputable breeders tend to not pair pups with families until they are 7-8 weeks old because they have different temperaments. The best methods for being paired with a pup are either the breeder takes total control over pairing, or the breeder guides the buyer in choices by describing qualities of each pup and narrowing down to best choices.
 

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Having a family pet as a kid is as different from raising a pet as the ‘adult in charge’ as babysitting/working in childcare is from having your own kids. It can be very rewarding, but it also can be very hard, especially if you’re doing it right. You work from home currently, is that likely to change?
Oh yes for sure I completely agree with you. Even as a kid having a puppy was sometimes difficult 🤣

And yes I work from home with a slow paced job that gives me time to spend with the dog more and no it will not change 😊
 

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I would be extra cautious for any breeder that has pups available at this time. Be extra sure that they have been fully health tested. Hip tests should have results through OFA or Pennhip. They should be able to link you to OFA health test results or at least show you the certifications. If they cannot provide test results, run run as fast as you can.

The way you talk about it sounds as if they're pairing pups with families when they are very young. Reputable breeders tend to not pair pups with families until they are 7-8 weeks old because they have different temperaments. The best methods for being paired with a pup are either the breeder takes total control over pairing, or the breeder guides the buyer in choices by describing qualities of each pup and narrowing down to best choices.
She showed me the health testing of the parents and is also giving me a health guarantee of two years for the pup accompanied by health testing. Like I said, I think I just got lucky 🤷🏼‍♀️ she's a newer breeder so isn't set up like long time breeders. She bought her dogs from reputable breeders in the US.

She isn't giving me him too young he will be 8 weeks old a couple days when I go get him 😊
 
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