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This afternoon, I took my eldest daughter to an allergy Dr. to do skin test for tree nut allergy because she mentioned that her throat felt itchy when she eats certain nuts. While we were at the Dr. office, I also asked them to test for dog and cat allergy too because we were planning on getting one (our favorite is dogs). Lo and behold, she tested positive for both cat and dog allergy.

The nurse said she would probably do OK with dogs that don't shed too much hair. I asked the Dr. if he felt her reaction would be manageable or get worse over time, he said that's a big question mark. Some people do OK if they keep the house and the dog clean and don't allow the dog in the affected person' bedroom. Other people's allergy get worse.

My kids and I are so disappointed (I've not told my hubby yet). I googled on dog allergy and poodles and did not find any conclusive answer. Part of me want to go ahead and deal with any allergy problem later if and when that actually happens. Part of me feel that would be wrong to bring a poodle into our family knowing this. I kind of wish I did not ask for the test.
 

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Don't give up yet. Poodles don't have fur, they have hair, which is why they are least allergetic for people with allergies to the dander in dog fur. They also don't shed which is why they need to be groomed every six weeks.

Some people, however, are allergic to a protein in the saliva of dogs. Some of the literature also says that the smaller the dog, and the more well-groomed, the less likely they will have an allergic reaction.

What I would do is take my child around a poodle and have him rub his arms and face in the poodle and have it lick him. Take some Benedryl in case he has a reactions. If he's asthmatic, I'd check with his doctor first. Personally, I've never known anyone to be allergic to a poodle.
 

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A friend of mine and his two children have severe allergies to dogs. However, when they met my poodle, Iris and spent time with her, petting, brushing and snuggling with her not one of the three of them experienced any allergy symptoms. They got a poodle puppy from a breeder who said she would take the pup back and refund their money if they had allergy issues. They have happily had their poodle for 8 yrs now.

Another friend with animal allergies got his first ever dog when he was 45 yrs old. His friend Dodger, a bichon, is 11 now. No issues at all.

I think it depends on the individual as well as the dog.

Here he is with Dodger.
 

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First of all, allergy testing is exceedingly inaccurate. This past time I was tested, I tested NEGATIVE for horses, rabbits, cats, etc., all of which I'm extremely allergic to in real life. And I've had recent exposure, so I know I didn't "grow out of it."

Secondly, I've only known one person to be allergic to a poodle, and she is one of our members here. She is still able to live with two toy poodles. So, I also suggest that your daughter get some short exposure to a poodle and see what happens before you think of giving up! I have allergies to everything in the universe and I'm totally fine with poodles! There is hope!
 

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I have allergies endear ago had to get shots for them. I am mostly allergic to mold spores and oak trees, however I also tested positive for dog & cats but I've had both all my life. I guess it also depends on your allergic reactions. Mine were scratchy throat, itching watering eyes n sneezing but I can live with all that without too much difficulty. I guess it all depends on the severity of the allergy too. I as others have said would let my daughter hang around a poodle, maybe foster a poodle and see how it goes
 

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Allergies can develop at any time in life. They can get better or worsen too. While a real world test of having your daughter meet a couple of poodles may give you insights, I would be cautious since a severe allergic reaction (as you know if your daughter has nut allergies) can be fatal.
 

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First of all, allergy testing is exceedingly inaccurate. This past time I was tested, I tested NEGATIVE for horses, rabbits, cats, etc., all of which I'm extremely allergic to in real life. And I've had recent exposure, so I know I didn't "grow out of it."

Secondly, I've only known one person to be allergic to a poodle, and she is one of our members here. She is still able to live with two toy poodles. So, I also suggest that your daughter get some short exposure to a poodle and see what happens before you think of giving up! I have allergies to everything in the universe and I'm totally fine with poodles! There is hope!
I think this might be me, lol !

Yes, I have severe allergies to dogs, cats and all with fur and feathers. I still react a bit to my poodles but it鈥檚 mostly itchy eyes, sneezing and sometimes a little asthma. No skin allergies to them. It鈥檚 manageable. On certain days I try to avoid them a little (they鈥檙e always in my face so it鈥檚 hard).

In my case, it takes 3 weeks to know if I can tolerate a dog. And all dogs are different and will give me slightly different reactions. When I get a dog, either a puppy or adult, I always make sure to have an agreement with the breeder, just in case I can鈥檛 keep the dog. They usually give me 2-3 weeks to test. More than that would be unfair for the dog. Of course there is a risk that your daughter鈥檚 heart will be broken if it doesn鈥檛 work, but I think it is worth it. Losing someone is part of life.

Besides the agreement with the breeder, I would also get a small dog, a toy for sure, around 5-6 pounds. And nothing but a poodle. Then, later in life, if your daughter does well with this dog, maybe she can tolerate bigger ones, even from other breeds.

Also just a warning, meeting other people鈥檚 dogs for a few hours might not do the trick. Unless your daughter actually lives with the dog, you can鈥檛 be sure it will work in the long run. And even then, some people react to one particular dog and not to another dog of the same breed. Also, there might be a tolerance build up after living with the dog for a while. This is what happens to me with the poodles, the allergies lessen with time, and become less and less until they reach a plateau where they are bearable. It鈥檚 an infinite and complex subject !

There is hope, don鈥檛 give up yet.
 

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I would have your daughter spend at least an hour or two in a house where poodles live. Snuggle with the poodles, rub her face in their hair, and get plenty of exposure. If she does not react, then I would go ahead with your plans to get a puppy. Most people with dog allergies are fine with poodles, but not all. As others have said, allergies can get better or worse over time.

Worst case: You think your daughter will be fine so you get the dog. But her allergies get worse and they cannot be managed. In that case, the poodle could be rehomed. It is pretty easy to find a new home for a purebred poodle that does not have health or behavior issues. Poodles are adaptable and do very well in new homes, assuming you find a good home. But my guess is that if your daughter does OK with spending some time with poodles before you decide, then she will be just fine when you get your own pup.
 

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i developed allergies at 25 when I moved to FL, including dogs. cats, etc. I have had toy poodles ever since and out frew the allergies at 32. I keep the bathed every 2 weeks, and groomed once a month, and brushed every other day. The sleep with me with no problem, Good luck
 

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Allergies are very individual - they are usually not as broad as every single cat and every single dog. I unfortunately have a lot of experience with them - severely pollen allergic and cat hair, mold, mites and dust. However even in my worst allergy state ( I have since had the shot treatment for years and my allergies have completely gone away - except for dust) - there was a long haired cat who wouldn't trigger my allergies at all. She is a beautiful longhaired snowshoe and kept impeccably clean by her owners. What I would recommend is that you look for a breeder who is willing to work with you and find a dog that is going to be bred within the future - IF your daughter does not react to this dog in the breeders house (since breeders usually have more than one dog the allergens would be off the charts) you should be fine at home too.
 

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I鈥檓 another one who tests positive for allergies to dogs but I had no problem growing up with a minipoo as a child. We had a tpoo when my kids were young and I currently have a minipoo.

I鈥檇 follow the wise advice previous posters suggested.
 
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Something I understand from a friend who trains service dogs, plus other reading, is that it not only depends on the individual person but the individual dog. If you find the puppy you really want, have the kid sit with THAT pup and see if there's a reaction. Just do one dog a visit, or you'll never know which one caused a reaction.

Good luck!
Marguerite
 
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Something I understand from a friend who trains service dogs, plus other reading, is that it not only depends on the individual person but the individual dog. If you find the puppy you really want, have the kid sit with THAT pup and see if there's a reaction. Just do one dog a visit, or you'll never know which one caused a reaction.

Good luck!
Marguerite
That is what I was trying to express - and was thinking that the mum or dad of a "pup to be" may offer some clues as to the reaction.
 

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Thanks Marguerite & Moni. Yes, we would take her to see the prospective puppy/parent if the distance allows.

Last night, our family sat down and discussed the poodle and allergy finding. We all voted to keep proceeding with getting a toy poodle, based on the info that we gathered:
- Our allergist did not tell us not to get a dog. He said he would discourage us getting several golden retrievers. But if we really want a dog, he would suggest a small, low-shedding dog.
- Most members here seem to handle poodles OK even though they tested positive for dog allergy (don't bother most, some became desensitized, a few took allergy shots).
- Some risk still exists, but from my research., dog allergy is rarely fatal. Nuts allergy, on the other hand, is more often fatal. From now on, my 12 year old would need to carry an epi pen with her at all times because of the nut allergy.

It would be safest not to get a dog, but we will try not to let fear control our lives.

Thanks again, everyone, for your help and support. Now comes the challenging task for finding a toy poodle reasonably close to us. Wish us luck.
 

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I sure do wish you luck and I'm pretty confident it will work! I was thinking that also, that food and medication allergies seem to be much more life-threatening than animals. Keep us posted on the journey to puppy!
 

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Thanks Marguerite & Moni. Yes, we would take her to see the prospective puppy/parent if the distance allows.

Last night, our family sat down and discussed the poodle and allergy finding. We all voted to keep proceeding with getting a toy poodle, based on the info that we gathered:
- Our allergist did not tell us not to get a dog. He said he would discourage us getting several golden retrievers. But if we really want a dog, he would suggest a small, low-shedding dog.
- Most members here seem to handle poodles OK even though they tested positive for dog allergy (don't bother most, some became desensitized, a few took allergy shots).
- Some risk still exists, but from my research., dog allergy is rarely fatal. Nuts allergy, on the other hand, is more often fatal. From now on, my 12 year old would need to carry an epi pen with her at all times because of the nut allergy.

It would be safest not to get a dog, but we will try not to let fear control our lives.

Thanks again, everyone, for your help and support. Now comes the challenging task for finding a toy poodle reasonably close to us. Wish us luck.
I鈥檓 really happy for you ! Planning a dog is almost as exciting as having the puppy come home.

In case it doesn鈥檛 turn out as expected, and I certainly wish you the best, please have a plan B for the puppy wellbeing and happiness.
 

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Thanks, Dechi. We hope and pray that everything will work out. For plan B, my daughter is willing to take the allergy shots to build immunity. If plan B also fails then we would need to re-home the pup. I've been looking at every corner of the Internet for a toy poodle from a reputable breeder in the Pacific Northwest. But have not had much luck. There are very few good breeders and those have very long waiting list (like 7 years out). I guess because toy poodle litter is so small (1 or two pups perhaps?), there's not enough to meet the demand.
At this rate, we won't have a poodle to worry about allergy.
 

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Thanks, Dechi. We hope and pray that everything will work out. For plan B, my daughter is willing to take the allergy shots to build immunity. If plan B also fails then we would need to re-home the pup. I've been looking at every corner of the Internet for a toy poodle from a reputable breeder in the Pacific Northwest. But have not had much luck. There are very few good breeders and those have very long waiting list (like 7 years out). I guess because toy poodle litter is so small (1 or two pups perhaps?), there's not enough to meet the demand.
At this rate, we won't have a poodle to worry about allergy.
Yes, they are rare, but possible to find, especially if you鈥檙e willing to compromise on the age of the puppy.

If you are willing to go for an older pup or young adult, I recommend calling the breeders and asking if they have any available. Sometimes breeders have oversized show prospects or young adults they need to place, or even retired breeders. The demand for those is not as high. I find that calling is a lot more efficient than emailing. While talking to them, you can also ask if they know anyone who would have what you鈥檙e looking for.

My two dogs are such dogs and it didn鈥檛 take long to find them at all. One is special needs and the other one lacked socialization, but to me it wasn鈥檛 an issue. It all depends on how much you are willing to compromise.
 
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