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Johnny figured out how to open the patio door and opens it when he wants in. But he won’t come in unless the door is open wider. The other two will push past him and comes in or he stands there and barks. :alberteinstein::argh:
 

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How funny. So he figured out how to press down on the lever door handle. That's pretty smart. But he is not getting that he can push against the cracked door to open it more. I bet he can learn that too with a little help or when he watches the other dogs more.:alberteinstein: Very cute!
 

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lol. They are clever, my guy has learned to open the gate latch if I don't have it clipped down under the lever. He will nose it up then open the gate and Yay I have freedom to the entire house. I have to make sure its clipped in. They are clever. Give him time and he will nose the door open. LOL
 

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lol. They are clever, my guy has learned to open the gate latch if I don't have it clipped down under the lever. He will nose it up then open the gate and Yay I have freedom to the entire house. I have to make sure its clipped in. They are clever. Give him time and he will nose the door open. LOL
Mufar, I used to have an Arabian mare who was really good at opening latches. She would let herself out, then go around the barn and let out her friends. The owner of the boarding stable was not amused. They had to put a snap catch on her latch. When I moved her here she quickly learned how to open the gate to the corral. I, too, was forced to use a snap catch. She always checked to see if, by any chance, someone forgot to use the snap. I could tell that she had been manipulating the gate chain.


So if a horse can do it, it doesn't surprise me at all that a poodle has figured it out.
 

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Johanna...I too had a couple of Arabian mares and one did the same thing. She figured out how to lift one of those kind of latches that you lift, then slide and she'd get out, munch on my lawn and I blamed my son for not latching the stall door. He swore he didn't forget and so I paid particular attention and sure enough. So I had to use a lead rope with a German snap to put through the little hole on the latch to keep it from sliding through. Arabian horses are to the horse world of intelligence as poodles are to the dog world. They're known for superior intelligence and unique affection and love for humans. It's on account of their history of being so prized and their evolution through their selective breeding. Aren't they just awesome Johanna? Mine didn't open it for the other horse though. She was self centered. haha.
 

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Haaa!! Looks like you’ve got your hands full. Their open mouthed poodle expression after they do something genius and mischievous always cracks me up.

“Ha! Look what I can do!”


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Haha, that is so cute! Frosty also won't push through a small opening, whereas Maizie has no problem using her body to manipulate a door, drawer, or whatever.

Mufar, I used to have an Arabian mare who was really good at opening latches. She would let herself out, then go around the barn and let out her friends. The owner of the boarding stable was not amused. They had to put a snap catch on her latch. When I moved her here she quickly learned how to open the gate to the corral. I, too, was forced to use a snap catch. She always checked to see if, by any chance, someone forgot to use the snap. I could tell that she had been manipulating the gate chain.
So if a horse can do it, it doesn't surprise me at all that a poodle has figured it out.
That is so cute, too, haha. When I had horses, there was one on the circuit whose show name was "Out All Night" because he used to do the exact same thing as the Arab mare.

Our horse Dave also got out of his stall one night, but he didn't bother letting anyone else out...he just went straight to the hay barn!
 

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What a clever boy! My Giant is part bulldozer. She can open doors (even the ones with round knobs). So if there's a small opening, she just plows through it. Giant Schnauzers can be very pushy by nature. Our front door is hard to open & close. I made the mistake of going out without her when someone arrived & she didn't like the look of them. She came bursting out the front door & charged. We have a big secure fence & a gate with a special latch on it (it keeps naughty people out & naughty Schnauzer in). But the person on the other side of the fence didn't care about fence or gate, they dived into the truck & fled.

My Standard Poodle thinks he is part snake. He figures if his nose fits, he can slither in. If he ever learned to open doors & such... we're in trouble :aetsch: He will go under things, into tunnels, under the bed, etc... He managed to squeeze himself beside the crate one time & was trying to figure out to go forward or backward to get out. I said nothing & he got out on his own. Very smart dog so I ought to have a lot of fun out of him.
 

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I too had a Arabian mare. LOL Seems we all have something in common there. I actually had mine for my daughter, when she was young she was big into riding and liked to shows. This horse was trained for dressage though www didn't practice that. But my daughters trainer could and put her thru her paces occasionally. She was a very spirited mare, too much for me. Yet my daughter at only 8 could handle her well.
 

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My little guy jumps and tries to reach the door handle to open the door. He's nearly got it, since it's a lever, but I double he'll be able to pull it open too :)
 

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I too had a Arabian mare. LOL Seems we all have something in common there. I actually had mine for my daughter, when she was young she was big into riding and liked to shows. This horse was trained for dressage though www didn't practice that. But my daughters trainer could and put her thru her paces occasionally. She was a very spirited mare, too much for me. Yet my daughter at only 8 could handle her well.
Yes, Arabians are often quite smart. My beloved mare, Ria, was just the best. She was spirited, but careful. You could put a child on her and she would be calm and quiet, but as soon as she sensed her rider was competent, she was all piss and vinegar. She bailed me out of several dangerous situations - for example when the saddle slipped while we were crossing a gully, she just stopped so I could get off and fix it. And once when we were on a very narrow trail in the mountains we came to a rock fall, so she just carefully backed up until there was room to turn around. When we had her at the ranch in Texas, the wrangler was riding her, leading some dudes, when they came to an area of slick rock - suddenly several rattlesnakes buzzed a warning. Instead of panicking, she just backed up slowly and carefully. I used to take her to our neighbor's arena and play a game with her that was like off-lead heeling. I coud speed up, slow down, step sideways and she would stay with me every step. An absolutely amazing mare! She is buried about 50 yards from where I am sitting right now - she will be my best-loved horse forever.
 

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I had an Arabian mare too! A long time ago. I got her because the guy who owned her was afraid of her and put some god-awful bit in her mouth and she hated it and would run right through it and he couldn't stop her. I put a simple snaffle on her and she was wonderful. Sensible, kind, went anywhere I asked without any fuss, stopped when I asked her to.

I'll join that fan club!
 

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Yes, Arabians are often quite smart. My beloved mare, Ria, was just the best. She was spirited, but careful. You could put a child on her and she would be calm and quiet, but as soon as she sensed her rider was competent, she was all piss and vinegar. She bailed me out of several dangerous situations - for example when the saddle slipped while we were crossing a gully, she just stopped so I could get off and fix it. And once when we were on a very narrow trail in the mountains we came to a rock fall, so she just carefully backed up until there was room to turn around. When we had her at the ranch in Texas, the wrangler was riding her, leading some dudes, when they came to an area of slick rock - suddenly several rattlesnakes buzzed a warning. Instead of panicking, she just backed up slowly and carefully. I used to take her to our neighbor's arena and play a game with her that was like off-lead heeling. I coud speed up, slow down, step sideways and she would stay with me every step. An absolutely amazing mare! She is buried about 50 yards from where I am sitting right now - she will be my best-loved horse forever.
One of my mares did the same thing. She was spirited but not as crazy as the other one. But when a child (my son or one time, my niece) got on her, her head would go down and she'd plod around the arena like an old nag. I'd get on her and she was full of it. They are incredibly intelligent and sensitive. I would call my girls to come to me in the pasture. It's give them a carrot and then say, "okay! Go play!" And they always did a little bucking and kicking up their heals when they were in that playful mood. So they'd turn to run off but never kick up their heals until they were well out of my reach. And when they would run to come see me, they'd run like lightening fast but always stopped in time before running into me. I could lie down in the pasture in the sun next to my Brisa, put my head on her shoulder and when she wanted to get up, she'd just shift her weight back and forth but not get up until I did and I was out of the way. My other one was sweet but very flighty and actually dangerous. She wouldn't mean to hurt anyone for the world but she was skittish as can be. I got both of these mares at 4.5 years of age from a 1700 acre ranch and they were unbroken. My Brisa though, was two weeks old when her mother was struck and killed by lightening so she was a bottle fed baby...exceedingly trusting of humans where the other girl took some serious work. But that one was amazingly gorgeous. Spanish (mostly) Arabians (with some Polish, Russian etc) with the big eyes and a pedigree that was amazing...Skowronek,

Those are some amazing examples you have there Johanna, of an Arabian horse's over-the-top intelligence. Wow!
 

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When my daughter was taking riding lessons we had a VIP come to stay at the stables. It was Khemosabi; he was well into his twenties, but you couldn't tell by looking at him. He pranced around the paddock like a young colt; it was a vision I still treasure. As for poodle brains... Sailor used to open the crate for our Jack Russell Terror, so they could play. He never let Wilson out, though.:s: My old female poodle was the smartest dog I have ever had. She would run to the fence and bark at nothing, so the Airedale would drop her bone to go bark... then, Chante' would steal the bone. She, also knew the names of about a dozen of her toys. She was a challenge to work in obedience because she learned so quickly, and sometimes I erred in my training methodology allowing her to learn something I did not intend to teach her.
 
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