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Never use your hands or feet to play with your puppy. Always use a toy and make sure that everyone else who plays with the puppy does so, as well.
If your puppy’s teeth touch your skin, immediately drop the toy and withdraw from the play session for a few moments.
When you return to the play session, do so with a toy, and praise your puppy for biting it instead of your hands.
 

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Good suggestions from Twyla. The land shark phase will end as the adult teeth come in, and it helps to keep them directed to targets which don't bleed :)
 

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I do it slightly differently. I want my pups to learn to be careful with their teeth, so while I don't encourage over-excited games with hands and feet I don't stop play at a touch but at anything that causes pain, at least at first. I shriek and turn away, muttering about nasty bitey puppies. If the pup withdraws the game starts again; if it perseveres with biting I briefly leave the room. Repeat, repeat, repeat, gradually reducing the threshold till any pressure at all stops play. Add in some games with treats that are only released when the pup stops trying to snatch and anything else I can think of that rewards careful use of the mouth, and eventually the puppy learns how to be careful, and remembers for the rest of its life. Long sleeves and tough trousers are helpful through the needle teeth stage.

If children are involved I would insist on play with toys only, and toys that keep the puppy's teeth at a safe distance. And teach children how to freeze, hands out of reach and close to the body - running, squealing, flapping children are an invitation to puppies to chase and grab.
 

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Both twyla and fjm hit on the important parts of this process (which does get a lot less painful once adult teeth come in). One thing I especially like about fjm's approach is that it really helps the pup to understand that a soft mouth around hands is not a problem. This way you will be able to take forbidden objects out of your dog's mouth later in life and it also can help make it easier to give medication.
 
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I do it slightly differently. I want my pups to learn to be careful with their teeth, so while I don't encourage over-excited games with hands and feet I don't stop play at a touch but at anything that causes pain, at least at first. I shriek and turn away, muttering about nasty bitey puppies. If the pup withdraws the game starts again; if it perseveres with biting I briefly leave the room. Repeat, repeat, repeat, gradually reducing the threshold till any pressure at all stops play. Add in some games with treats that are only released when the pup stops trying to snatch and anything else I can think of that rewards careful use of the mouth, and eventually the puppy learns how to be careful, and remembers for the rest of its life. Long sleeves and tough trousers are helpful through the needle teeth stage.

If children are involved I would insist on play with toys only, and toys that keep the puppy's teeth at a safe distance. And teach children how to freeze, hands out of reach and close to the body - running, squealing, flapping children are an invitation to puppies to chase and grab.
Agree with fjm almost 100%. I have always encouraged a soft mouth and very accurate bite inhibition by trying to let them figure out how hard is too hard. They also learn that different people have different thresholds. The only thing I had to modify with Landshark - Poodle Kid is the shriek, which would very much arouse rather than calm him.(curse words are a nice substitute although with my 4 year old grand-son around we had to curb those as well - lol) Shoving toys into his mouth in lieu of hands was a big thing for us - but his mouthiness was off the charts for the first 5 months at least. It went away (almost magically) as soon as the last tooth fell out. He now is acceptable in both frequency and intensity unless he is overly tired - which doesn't mean he bites, but he becomes bitey-clingy with an over focus on my hands - which means I give him a chewy + crate time stat. With my four year old grandson Louie was exceptionally gentle always - however my grandson was taught that he can be a dog trainer and uses "sit" and "down" proudly so - and if all else fails knows "give him the cold shoulder" = cross your arms in front of your body and turn around as a clear signal to Poodle kid "I don't want your crazy attention". This works 100% of the time. All this in combination has worked very well for us. They are quite cute together and he listens to my grandson extremely well and adores him.
 
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