Poodle Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

Registered
Joined
275 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So in much of the US, and soon (I think) in Canada, people are anticipating and attempting to return to post-pandemic social and professional norms. This means big changes for pandemic puppies, and for all dogs who've gotten acclimated to the homebody lifestyle many of us have had the privilege of living. What are you doing, or planning to do, to prepare your dogs for what comes next? The biggest change I anticipate and worry about for Oona will be spending more time with us away from the house, though I think I will still be teaching remotely in the fall so I probably won't have to leave her right away. I might have to go to an in-person conference at the end of October for 4-5 days and I'm freaked out about that (even though she'll be with my husband and kid at home, so it will prob be more me missing her). I'm also concerned about her getting used to having other people in our home, but more worried about the practical inevitability that she will go through some separation anxiety. She already seems stressed the few and brief times we leave her.

I had hoped by this time in the spring, we'd be able to start making short family errand trips, I could work in coffee shops, etc. But we are under a new stay-at-home order, so we don't go really anywhere other than to take the dog and kid out to play, exercise or train. Errands are done by one adult at a time, so there are no times when everyone leaves the house. And my daughter is doing remote school in the living room probably till June, so we can't even crate her in a room alone to simulate leaving for work while absconding to our basement and upstairs home offices, since her crate is in the living room (and the daughter needs an adult nearby for support.)

My two ideas for the immediate and short term are
1. to put her in her crate with a stuffed kong and disappear - all of us to the yard - for 10 minutes. If she learns to handle that we can experiment with lengthening the time again, but maybe by that point some things will be open again and we can try for errand outings or short social outings without the dog.
2. To hire a dog walker for one day a week to get her used to a person outside our family and to prepare her for if/when we need someone to come help exercise and potty her if there are days neither of us can come home at lunch to take her out.

Any other ideas for this weird in-between phase? What are your plans to prepare your dogs for all the upcoming changes?
 

Registered
Joined
64 Posts
I am feeling the same way as you about things getting back to "normal" although we are in the U.K. We had shops, cafes etc reopen last Monday. My son went back to school full time 2 weeks ago and my daughter started her college placement today (4 days per week). Cooper has gone from us all being at home to it now just being me and him. Today was the first day just the 2 of us. I started taking him out places on my own last week to prepare him for a new routine. I actually really enjoyed our routine today and found he was more focused because there were less distractions at home. Last week, we made a few trips to dog friendly coffee shops to teach him manners in a new environment. Today I met a friend for lunch and took Cooper along. He quite happily lay at my feet under the table which completely surprised me. I thought he may have been a bit over excited but he proved me wrong 馃榾

I am a little unsure about leaving him home alone too. He will happily stay downstairs while I'm upstairs and isn't stuck to my side constantly. He is crate trained and sleeps in there all night. I did give him the option of sleeping in bed with me but the crate is where he is happy. If I leave home and he is with the kids, they say that he watches me leaving then lies down to sleep until I come back.

I'm looking forward to seeing some suggestions on this post about the best way to get them used to being home alone. Cooper will never be left any longer than an hour. I wish you all the best in the weeks ahead and this period of adjustment for you, your family and Oona.
 

Super Moderator
Joined
9,055 Posts
Our 鈥渘ormal鈥 won鈥檛 be changing a whole lot, but we鈥檙e way behind on getting Peggy accustomed to our preferred lifestyle, which includes a fair bit of travel.

We鈥檝e got a dogsitter coming to stay for two nights in June, in anticipation of eventually leaving her for longer when we can re-book our cruise or another dog-free vacation.

We鈥檝e also got two nights booked in a cabin next week, to start getting her accustomed to sleeping away from home; we鈥檒l do a day trip to Seattle to start acclimating her to city life; and my husband plans to do a short ferry trip with her after she鈥檚 recovered from her spay at the end of the month. (That鈥檚 the one part of our pre-covid life that I really wish we could have exposed her to as a puppy.)
 

Premium Member
Joined
7,041 Posts
Mine always know if I am just outside , so I merely tell them I will be right back.
I think you going to actually get in the car and take a trip to nowhere.
I have worked through out the pandemic, when I leave I give my dogs th their kongs and just go, no excitement or good byes, if I linger too long they will get excited and bark.
 

Registered
Joined
275 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Our 鈥渘ormal鈥 won鈥檛 be changing a whole lot, but we鈥檙e way behind on getting Peggy accustomed to our preferred lifestyle, which includes a fair bit of travel.

We鈥檝e got a dogsitter coming to stay for two nights in June, in anticipation of eventually leaving her for longer when we can re-book our cruise or another dog-free vacation.

We鈥檝e also got two nights booked in a cabin next week, to start getting her accustomed to sleeping away from home; we鈥檒l do a day trip to Seattle to start acclimating her to city life; and my husband plans to do a short ferry trip with her after she鈥檚 recovered from her spay at the end of the month. (That鈥檚 the one part of our pre-covid life that I really wish we could have exposed her to as a puppy.)
That's a good point, bringing her places to stay is something we'd like to do. I think a summer visit to the in-laws may be in the cards once we've had our first shots and transmission is down.
 

Registered
Joined
275 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Mine always know if I am just outside , so I merely tell them I will be right back.
I think you going to actually get in the car and take a trip to nowhere.
I have worked through out the pandemic, when I leave I give my dogs th their kongs and just go, no excitement or good byes, if I linger too long they will get excited and bark.
Argh I know! That makes sense, it's just so hard for several reasons. Number one being that I'm barely getting any work done as it is with my daughter remote schooling, and the dog-related exercise outings are all I can manage. The second being that getting all three people particularly a very distractible 9 year old out the door is NEVER quiet or fast.
 

Premium Member
Joined
7,041 Posts
Then take the kid to McDonalds for drive lunch, something like that, just 10 minutes. Take the kid with you, tell her if she is quiet she get a small treat
 

Registered
Joined
849 Posts
My situations different...

(Single working... 32... No kids... Retired parents 10 minute drive away to watch Basil while I'm at work.)

Basil will be spending 2 days/week during the summer again with a 15/16 year old dog sitter/family-friend to give my parents a break, $30/day. She plays with their boston terrier and the son plays on his phone all day, texting girls, or whatever these young'uns do these days. It's like an 8-9 hour playdate.

Maybe this summer is a good time to see if any high schoolers could help us out.
 

Premium Member
Killa and Tekno
Joined
308 Posts
Fortunately, my job is giving us the option to work from home permanently so I'm taking that :). I worked carefully though to make sure Tekno didn't develop seperation anxiety but I think just in his nature, he's just really social and would be unhappy to be without people for most the day. Accordingly I've been teaching him manners so he can be with me on outing whether that be at my side and not bothering passerbys or hidden away in a bag/purse. As things open up and my vaccine is at full efficacy, I'll start practicing manners with him in dog friendly places like the mall. I didn't do the home depot thing because questionable trainers go and train their big, aggressive dogs off leash there to get instagram likes lol.
 

Registered
Joined
275 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Fortunately, my job is giving us the option to work from home permanently so I'm taking that :). I worked carefully though to make sure Tekno didn't develop seperation anxiety but I think just in his nature, he's just really social and would be unhappy to be without people for most the day. Accordingly I've been teaching him manners so he can be with me on outing whether that be at my side and not bothering passerbys or hidden away in a bag/purse. As things open up and my vaccine is at full efficacy, I'll start practicing manners with him in dog friendly places like the mall. I didn't do the home depot thing because questionable trainers go and train their big, aggressive dogs off leash there to get instagram likes lol.
It would be cool to be able to continue WFH, but I'm a prof in the early stages of working toward tenure and I'm going to have to go back to campus/classroom at some point (which honestly I am looking forward to). But because fall will be at least partly remote and I'm taking a sabbatical in January, I won't be close to "full time" on campus until Fall 2022. And even then, it will not be 5 days a week 9-5 at the office because I don't have to be on campus when I don't have teaching, committee meetings, or office hours, but assuming it's like my pre-pandemic schedule there will be some days when I do have to go to campus when I can't get home for lunch. Hence the dog walker. It seems like the social nature is the reason many poodles are prone to separation anxiety, though they can be taught to tolerate some amount of time alone. If campus allowed dogs inside buildings, I feel like she'd do well as a part time office dog, but they don't, sadly for us.
 

Premium Member
Killa and Tekno
Joined
308 Posts
It would be cool to be able to continue WFH, but I'm a prof in the early stages of working toward tenure and I'm going to have to go back to campus/classroom at some point (which honestly I am looking forward to). But because fall will be at least partly remote and I'm taking a sabbatical in January, I won't be close to "full time" on campus until Fall 2022. And even then, it will not be 5 days a week 9-5 at the office because I don't have to be on campus when I don't have teaching, committee meetings, or office hours, but assuming it's like my pre-pandemic schedule there will be some days when I do have to go to campus when I can't get home for lunch. Hence the dog walker. It seems like the social nature is the reason many poodles are prone to separation anxiety, though they can be taught to tolerate some amount of time alone. If campus allowed dogs inside buildings, I feel like she'd do well as a part time office dog, but they don't, sadly for us.
Oh cool, I was a professor at UCLA. A lot of our tenured professors kept their dogs in their office even though it wasn鈥檛 officially allowed. Fortunately, the Dean didn鈥檛 care and well, they were tenured lol. Anywho, good luck on getting tenure, that鈥檚 exciting!
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top