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Reading this as I lay in bed with Sophie & Jake I’m glad to hear all is well , good night beautiful Peggy!
 

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Our friend has encountered this same owner before, luckily with just one of the dogs, but it was unleashed on a popular walking and biking trail. I agree something needs to be done.
I too am glad that your husband and Peggy are both okay. It could have turned out very differently.

But if "something needs to be done" you must be the one to do it. The irresponsible dog owner who consistently allows his dogs off-leash in public places will do nothing differently. He relies on gentle souls like you and your husband to never speak up in any way that matters. If this same person ran stop signs on a regular basis and endangered his neighbors, someone would report him. What he's doing with his two big, aggressive dogs is not different.

Off-leash dogs are illegal in nearly every town and municipality in the US. Because they pose a danger to everyone, not because they're obnoxious, or of a certain breed. Personal injury, car accidents, damage to property, and death of other people's pets are the results of irresponsible owners allowing their dogs to run off-leash.

So, if something needs to done, you must do it. File a complaint with your animal control office. You and any neighbor who has encountered these animals must do that. Being "nice about it" is not the way to go.

Unless you want to encounter this idiot again. And that will surely happen.
 

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Normie wants to walk with you from now on.
I would love to walk with you and Normie! I read your story about Normie catching robins without hurting them. Charlie the Poodle agrees with Normie. They are lovely toys and why won't silly people keep the gifts? Charlie leapt 4 feet straight up into the air and grabbed a flying Robin. Luckily he instantly responds to Leave It, and gently gave me the Robin. He was quite bewildered when I insisted on letting it fly away again

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I am so glad to hear Peggy and your DH are ok! I had a very similar incident that I think I may have shared here before. I am rarely here these days, but still get updates once in a while. So the attacking dogs in my horrible incident were American Bulldogs (very similar in style and build to Dogos) and we were on a rail trail very close to our house. I walked passed a house next to an orchard early morning with my two leashed dogs - a Pointer and a Dalmatians and the two Amercian Bulldogs came charging at us from their yard. What happened next was pure gut reaction - I don't recommend it and I am still traumatized by it but I gathered both leashes tightly behind me tucked both my large and strong dogs behind me, lifted my arms and loudly cursed and shouted at the approaching dogs. I acted like a completely unhinged lunatic. First it startled them. They stopped. Then they tried to creep closer, trying to avoid me (I was acting even more crazy and they did not want anything to do with me - they just wanted to get passed me and at my dogs). So they crept closer and I stomped and screamed and kicked up the gravel towards them. That startled them. Then I advanced towards them screaming actually charging at them (my two boys tugged behind me then). The older one of the two American Bulldogs had enough of this lunatic woman and ran back home. The younger male was still sizing me up and now the completely ineffectual owner appeared being roused by my non stop screaming and hollering. The woman made some feeble calls of "come" which the dog completely ignored and it was visibly emboldened by the owner's appearance. We kept this dance up for at least another 10 minutes - the owner incapable of catching the dog, me by now hoarse from screaming and my two boys tugged behind me and scared (but I knew at the same time if I let them go there would be a major fight). So this went on and on - the dog circling around me but keeping a distance and then a poor jogger came on the scene. The dog let off us and pursued the jogger - the woman screaming and cursing at the owner! It was a mess! I was able to move on - and get out of what the dog considers his territory (I felt terrible for the jogger, but she seemed to give the owner a piece of her mind) Unfortunately our car was in the other direction, so we had to pass the scene yet again. We walked 15 minutes in the other direction to calm down me talking to my dogs in a cheerful and upbeat tone and then 15 minutes back to the same spot and to our horror the scene was almost the same as half hour before, only now two guys on bikes also were involved because the out of control dog was now trying to attack them as well. In the fracas we made it passed all this mess and ran back to our car. To this day I regret that I did not exchange phone numbers with the other parties involved. The owners of these horrible dogs many years later finally moved or surrendered their dogs I don't exactly what happened, but the dogs are no longer there. I avoided the house for many years even though it is my closest walking trail near my house. In other words do yourself a favor and for the future you DO report it...you may be saving someone else's or someone's dogs life!
You are absolutely right. All scary dog attacks launched from houses should be reported to police because a record is kept and often the police will go an issue a warning. My friend and I were walking our dogs together and a huge Rottweiler barreled out of a fenced yard with big signs warning Guard Dog, Danger. The 7 foot fence does not help when the gate is wide open. This dog had chased my friend several times already. Since the whole area has fenced yards, there was no place to retreat, and I was NOT going to turn my back on a beast that had already crossed a 2 lane public road, 2 sidewalks and had us pinned against a 7 foot chain link fence. It was snarling and trying to get at our dogs, my timid friend was hysterical and trying to hide her little dog behind her. I can summon a sergeant mayor's voice at will, and was roaring and bellowing at the dog, making myself big with arms raised, just like fending off a cougar attack. The stupid owner came out onto his 2nd floor balcony and bleated some useless stuff, dog ignored him. So I turned my wrath onto the owner with threats of police and screams of rage. It is not a residential area, so no help there. Finally a motorist with a big truck came by and managed to drive off the dog by charging it repeatedly with his truck. We made our escape. The dog is still there but the gate has never been left open again.

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hi PeggytheParti.

I just wanted to check in and see if you noticed any changes or reactivity after this awful incident.

I had a similar thing happen yesterday with just one aggressive bigger dog while at a park trying to do recall training on a long line. The dog came over from way across the field. It started as a sniff so I thought it would be OK but Beau got playful and when Beau did a paw pounce on the dogs side it snarled and growled and got on top of little Beau and in his face. I was scared to death he was going to bite but he didn’t. Maybe I moved in in time or maybe this was just a “strong” correction for Beau. The owner called his dog, Spider, and left the park.

Beau has had a lot of interaction and play with well behaved dogs and I’ve never seen one be this intense, fiercely showing teeth and such an attack on my baby. Beau seemed fine afterwards. I, of course, was traumatized. I’m so worried 😟
 

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A dog park where there are loose dogs is not an appropriate place to do recall training on a long line. I don't mean to be deeply critical but this was just a recipe for problems. Spider's owner seems to have been using the space as intended and it seems like you weren't. I think it is sort of sad that Spider ended up being the one to leave. I do certainly hope Beau is okay. If he shows signs of PTSD you will train against it using counter conditioning. Remember that dogs aren't babies and should be treated as what they are, dogs.
 

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A dog park where there are loose dogs is not an appropriate place to do recall training on a long line. I don't mean to be deeply critical but this was just a recipe for problems. Spider's owner seems to have been using the space as intended and it seems like you weren't. I think it is sort of sad that Spider ended up being the one to leave. I do certainly hope Beau is okay. If he shows signs of PTSD you will train against it using counter conditioning. Remember that dogs aren't babies and should be treated as what they are, dogs.
It sounds like this was a park, not a dog park.

@Apricot mini momma, Peggy is doing absolutely fine. :) Just take some deep breaths—Beau relies on you to communicate to him that everything is okay—and resume his usual routine. If he can have some off-leash time with gentle, well-socialized dogs, that might be helpful as a “reset.”
 

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A dog park where there are loose dogs is not an appropriate place to do recall training on a long line. I don't mean to be deeply critical but this was just a recipe for problems. Spider's owner seems to have been using the space as intended and it seems like you weren't. I think it is sort of sad that Spider ended up being the one to leave. I do certainly hope Beau is okay. If he shows signs of PTSD you will train against it using counter conditioning. Remember that dogs aren't babies and should be treated as what they are, dogs.
Thank you for your concern, Beau does seem fine today. It was a park where leashes are required so the dog should not have been free.
 

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It sounds like this was a park, not a dog park.

@Apricot mini momma, Peggy is doing absolutely fine. :) Just take some deep breaths—Beau relies on you to communicate to him that everything is okay—and resume his usual routine. If he can have some off-leash time with gentle, well-socialized dogs, that might be helpful as a “reset.”
Thank you and I’m so happy to hear Peggy blew off her bad interaction. It sounded much worse than what Beau went through. I guess it’s just “life” school for dogs.

Our 90 lb lab was attacked at a park once and he sort blew it off and I didn’t really worry about him afterwards. Maybe because he was bigger and older it just seemed different.
 

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Thank you and I’m so happy to hear Peggy blew off her bad interaction. It sounded much worse than what Beau went through. I guess it’s just “life” school for dogs.

Our 90 lb lab was attacked at a park once and he sort blew it off and I didn’t really worry about him afterwards. Maybe because he was bigger and older it just seemed different.
Minis are fragile, so I understand your concern. One intentional pounce from a larger dog, even if not technically an attack, could have lasting consequences.

We were at the beach yesterday, and the off-leash dogs were exhausting. They were overwhelmingly the least well-behaved of the bunch, and the owners were totally tuned out. It’s hard to stay calm and project confidence to your pup when you’re constantly looking over your shoulder. We even had one run up to our front door the other day!! I let Peggy go because his owners couldn’t get him—“I’m sorry! He’ll bite me if I grab him!!”—and she ran with him all the way down the driveway and into the middle of the road. Oh my nerves. Every time she’d try to come back to me, he’d be right on her again.
 
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