Poodle Forum banner

161 - 173 of 173 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,293 Posts
Discussion Starter #161
It does seem to echo the pattern of a few weeks ago. I assume you weren't anywhere that could have been treated with chemicals this time? The play date alone may have been exciting enough after so many weeks of enforced social distancing, of course, even without the added stressor of a yappy dog. Would it be possible to set up a one-to-one playdate with a dog she knows and likes at the same venue, and see how she is after that?
I think next week it'll just be her and a dog she's known since puppyhood, so that will eliminate the stress variable. The property is fenced and chemical-free.

When we first brought her home from the breeder, she vomited the first few days. I assumed it was the food she was on, but maybe she does have a more emotionally sensitive stomach than I thought. Would be very poodle of her!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
I think next week it'll just be her and a dog she's known since puppyhood, so that will eliminate the stress variable. The property is fenced and chemical-free.

When we first brought her home from the breeder, she vomited the first few days. I assumed it was the food she was on, but maybe she does have a more emotionally sensitive stomach than I thought. Would be very poodle of her!
I may have mentioned this supplement before, VetriScience Composure Pro chews. This supplement’s “Pro” Line is sold at veterinarians only. This product was formulated for support of dog’s cognitive behavior in the stress circumstances. Here is the link to the information
I tried to recommend it during Peggy’s heat stress behavior, but my post seems to have disappeared...
If you are interested, check with your vet. After I could no longer purchase the “Pro“ line on Amazon, I contacted the manufacturer, informing them that our vet’s prices were prohibitive. VetriScience replied to me and informed that the cost should be around $37.00.
We checked with our vet’s office and it turned out that they lowered the price. If you would rather buy it on Amazon, this product should be in stock by 9/8/20, but Amazon’s price became >$50.
This supplement does help our st. poodle, who has severe separation anxiety problem. I don’t like to give her medications, but this supplement can be given either regularly or ~ 30min. prior to dog going into the potentially stressful situation.
Maybe this will help Peggy and be your “ just in case” supplement.
Hope Peggy’s next play date will be less stressful.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,293 Posts
Discussion Starter #163
I may have mentioned this supplement before, VetriScience Composure Pro chews. This supplement’s “Pro” Line is sold at veterinarians only. This product was formulated for support of dog’s cognitive behavior in the stress circumstances. Here is the link to the information
I tried to recommend it during Peggy’s heat stress behavior, but my post seems to have disappeared...
If you are interested, check with your vet. After I could no longer purchase the “Pro“ line on Amazon, I contacted the manufacturer, informing them that our vet’s prices were prohibitive. VetriScience replied to me and informed that the cost should be around $37.00.
We checked with our vet’s office and it turned out that they lowered the price. If you would rather buy it on Amazon, this product should be in stock by 9/8/20, but Amazon’s price became >$50.
This supplement does help our st. poodle, who has severe separation anxiety problem. I don’t like to give her medications, but this supplement can be given either regularly or ~ 30min. prior to dog going into the potentially stressful situation.
Maybe this will help Peggy and be your “ just in case” supplement.
Hope Peggy’s next play date will be less stressful.
Thank you!! I'm going to look into it.

We definitely could have used a little extra support during those first few days of her heat. What a nightmare that was. And we've been so careful when exposing her to other dogs, keeping it as positive as we possibly can, that maybe she's not developed a thick enough social skin.

At least her tummy is settled again, and no diarrhea, thank goodness.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Thank you!! I'm going to look into it.

We definitely could have used a little extra support during those first few days of her heat. What a nightmare that was. And we've been so careful when exposing her to other dogs, keeping it as positive as we possibly can, that maybe she's not developed a thick enough social skin.

At least her tummy is settled again, and no diarrhea, thank goodness.
So, glad to hear her poo is ok.
Hang on, her stress level might be up and down ( like before & after the heat) and it’ll level off as well. Hormones do their job on her. Being a real poodle, she senses and responds to perceived stressors in her own way. Are you and everyone in the family ok? I’m not being nosy. Our Sasha reacts to everything: from silence to raised eyebrow. And deals with perceived stressors by getting depressed, having GI issues or skin problems. She is like a dog stressonomer; nothing can be hidden from her.
Maybe you have your own 😊
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,293 Posts
Discussion Starter #165
So, glad to hear her poo is ok.
Hang on, her stress level might be up and down ( like before & after the heat) and it’ll level off as well. Hormones do their job on her. Being a real poodle, she senses and responds to perceived stressors in her own way. Are you and everyone in the family ok? I’m not being nosy. Our Sasha reacts to everything: from silence to raised eyebrow. And deals with perceived stressors by getting depressed, having GI issues or skin problems. She is like a dog stressonomer; nothing can be hidden from her.
Maybe you have your own 😊
Oh gosh, you're describing my last dog, Gracie! If I got sick, she got sick. I remember heading to the emergency room once, having to maneuver around her piles of vomit on the floor to get out the door. That was like a telepathic bond. It was intense for both of us!

Peggy is more of a defuser. She's very good at making us laugh. While Gracie would crawl into my lap and comfort me if, for example, my husband and I were bickering about something, Peggy will just slap me in the face with a paw or ask us to go outside and play.

And no, nothing's especially wrong here at the moment, but she's definitely experienced a big disruption to her routine. Covid shut everything down for months, and we were just getting back to classes when she got sick. And then she was finally getting better when—argh!—she went into heat. So she's definitely been more bored and isolated than I'd like. I mean, we've not had a single guest in our home since New Year's! Just a brutal situation for an adolescent dog.

By the time she experiences something like a big family picnic, she'll be well into true adulthood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,783 Posts
Purina's probiotic, and other probiotics in dog food are over processed which kills most of the active probiotic bacteria.
I am now giving my dog organic grass fed Kefir - plain, not flavored. He loves it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Oh gosh, you're describing my last dog, Gracie! If I got sick, she got sick. I remember heading to the emergency room once, having to maneuver around her piles of vomit on the floor to get out the door. That was like a telepathic bond. It was intense for both of us!

Peggy is more of a defuser. She's very good at making us laugh. While Gracie would crawl into my lap and comfort me if, for example, my husband and I were bickering about something, Peggy will just slap me in the face with a paw or ask us to go outside and play.

And no, nothing's especially wrong here at the moment, but she's definitely experienced a big disruption to her routine. Covid shut everything down for months, and we were just getting back to classes when she got sick. And then she was finally getting better when—argh!—she went into heat. So she's definitely been more bored and isolated than I'd like. I mean, we've not had a single guest in our home since New Year's! Just a brutal situation for an adolescent dog.

By the time she experiences something like a big family picnic, she'll be well into true adulthood.
Our first standard, Micki, we got as a puppy, from breeder, at 10 weeks. She knew me as “ mommy” and I was her primary care taker. Husband and son were afraid to break her ( she was the runt of the litter of 7, and fit into my small palm), so they began playing with her and walking her when she got a bit bigger. I fed her, groomed, took to the vet, trained her. And she kept both men “ in line”. Any playful pushing or shoving, she’d bark and pull them apart.
We had two large trees along the length of the yard. My husband connected the trees by a metal cable, running parallel along the length of the yard, thread a small metal ring, and hooked one end of her long leash (Its length was a bit longer than the whole width of the yard), the other end of leash got hooked to the dog’s collar. As the dog moved, the leash would move with her directed along the cable by the ring. because iAny time she wanted to be outside, we’d hook her up to the leash and she was free to roam around, without leash pulling on her or tangling her legs. She could run the whole perimeter of our yard. It was great, especially in the winter. She loved rolling in the snow.
We moved south for the jobs and she lost her big yard with the runner, she had to get used to having practically, no snow, and get used to the new house. But the worst was when I changed jobs and had to travel extensively. In the beginning, she would stop eating and stayed by the window, waiting for me to return. She refused to play or “ talk to anyone”. It took her a while to get used to my absences and to get closer to my husband and son.
Then I hurt my back and first could no longer travel, then got on disability and for a while, worked from home office.
She became even closer to me. She knew that I’m getting a spasm, before I could feel it. She’d put her head on my knee or stick her head under my hand. Once, she saw me losing consciousness. After that time, she wouldn’t allow me to go to the rest room alone. She became my shadow. And around that same time, she began having occasional seizures, when her rear end and hind legs would shake and she couldn’t move. Any time she sensed the seizure could Ming on, she’d run to me, hide in my lap from the light, and stay with me until the end of seizure.
As time went by, I got worse, she got more protective. I spent lots of time home and she was with me, wherever I was. She became my girlfriend, my link to the world outside. She adjusted her walk to allow for my limping and inability to walk far or fast. Her legs began hurting, but she tried to hide it and jumped and ran as usual. Then one Thanksgiving, we had family over, but she was unusually subdued and tried to keep to herself. After the guests left, I noticed a tiny growth on one of her toes. It looked red and exuded very unpleasant odor.
We immediately took her to the vet. Upon exam, vet aspirated the growth and sent it to the special pathology lab. Mran while, vet told me that she doesn’t like the look and odor of the growth and insisted on removing it. That was before Christmas. Results of pathology came back - melanoma. We were referred to vet. oncologist.
He ordered PET scan, found no metastasis, said that Micki was in good shape, but immediately scheduled the surgical removal of one toe. We dropped her off her n 12/31 and picked her up early next morning. I’m a medic and knew what melanoma meant...
Upon release, we were offered to participate in clinical research study, for Micky to have melanoma vaccinations. I read the information about the vaccine, it’s side effects, and asked only 1 question - by how long this vaccine will prolong Micki’s life. I was told - possibly by 6 mos. The pain and discomfort from research treatment were too severe and living 6 more months , with such suffering, wasn’t worth it. I got all the post-op medications, strong painkiller, and supplies for changing the bandages. We turned our living room into small surgery. I changed Micki’s diet to home made rice/vegetables and salmon. We found her special booties for the rainy or cold weather, and I took care of her post-op recovery, compounded by yeast infection on all of her feet. I drove her every 3 months, alternating between oncologist ( where she was checked internally for progress of tumor) and our vet.
No one, who didn’t know that Micki had cancer and underwent surgery, could even guess, from her demeanor, that she was very ill. With my bandaging, creating her affected paw, enough padding, she was able to walk in her booties outside. Our whole neighborhood loved her and all, even children, patted her gently during our short walks. She lived 18 more months, during which, we both were laid off.
Then on a beautiful, sunny May morning, we went for a short walk, during which she had a long seizure. Once the seizure was over, Micki pulled on her leash to go home. My husband carried her back. She began to have cluster seizures at home and I understood what it meant.
Ironically, the previous week, she had “clean bill of health” by oncologist - no metastasis in lungs or other organs On x-ray.
Unfortunately, her head wasn’t x-rayed. ER doctor offered to keep Micki on phenobarbital, to prevent seizures, but it meant that she would be sleeping pretty much 24/7 and wouldn’t have quality of life. I had to let go off my closest and the only girlfriend...
She fell asleep while I sung her lullaby, that she knew since her first months of living fe with us.
I apologize for teary story...
I wanted to share how perceptive st. poodles are, but instead... I told Micki’s story.
I couldn’t stop crying for 6 months. Finally, I began looking for puppy, but being both unemployed, we couldn’t afford puppy from breeders. I contacted all the poodle rescues and shelters. Finally, I saw an ad on Greg’s list for re-homing st. Poodle. And that’s how, we adopted 11months, abused physically and emotionally, Sasha. My heart went out to her. But to put her into our SUV, my husband gently lifted her up, and during the trip home, we made a stop to feed her and he lowered her down from SUV, then lifted her up back in. She knew his hands first and became his dog. I took care of her, just like I cared of Micki. But I became disabled and can’t walk her, play or train her. As a result, she completely turned away from me...
She only stays with me downstairs, during the night, because she used to sleep in my bedroom upstairs. I understand her, my husband walks with her, feeds her, and takes her to groom and to the vet. I’m home bound and barely get up. She got glued to her “ daddy”. Strangely though, she still insists on coming with me to the restroom. I wonder why?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Purina's probiotic, and other probiotics in dog food are over processed which kills most of the active probiotic bacteria.
I am now giving my dog organic grass fed Kefir - plain, not flavored. He loves it.
We give Sasha the same- low fat, kefir as a snack. She loves it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,500 Posts
I am in tears for you, Mick. Such a wonderful friendship.

Poppy definitely suffered from stress diarrhoea. It was one of the things that made recognising serious illness so difficult - after years and years of middle of the night upset tummy, completely better within 48 hours, at first the liver symptoms seemed like just another bout of the same old same old.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Oh dear one, thank you for sharing Micki's story, and a little of yours, too. I can relate to so much of it. Wish I could give you a big, gentle hug.
Oh dear one, thank you for sharing Micki's story, and a little of yours, too. I can relate to so much of it. Wish I could give you a big, gentle hug.
Thank you for your empathy.
As I said, it wasn’t my intention to make anyone to feel sorry for me. I meant to share the examples of poodles’ uncanny sense and ability to take our problems onto themselves. Instead, Micki’s story just poured out. I guess it’s never too far from the sirface. All around our area, people, especially began adopting dogs, to avoid the isolation and loneliness. It’s gotten so bad, that to find a puppy to adopt is close to impossible. The only ones that are left in the shelters or rescues, are the bigger and older breeds. Those who lost their jobs, can’t afford to get puppy from a breeder. So, they turned to rescues. It’s a bit concerning trend. On one hand, puppies are getting homes, but on another, what happens when cute little fur ball needs attention and becomes mischievous teenager? My heart goes to the little ones, that get adopted with the best intention, but when they will need nurturing themselves, I’d like to believe, that their owners won’t turn around and give them back to rescues. On the other hand, those who can’t provide for the sick and elderly bigger dogs, already gave them up. Our rescues are in constant need for supplies and food. People are surviving however they can, but their faithful companions end up abandoned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
I am in tears for you, Mick. Such a wonderful friendship.

Poppy definitely suffered from stress diarrhoea. It was one of the things that made recognising serious illness so difficult - after years and years of middle of the night upset tummy, completely better within 48 hours, at first the liver symptoms seemed like just another bout of the same old same old.
fjm,
I’ve been looking for your posts.
Don’t shed tears for Micki, dear friend. She was and is in my heart. How is Poppy and you are doing? Yours is a rocky path to walk on. Drop a line, please. My hugs to Poppy and Sofie.
 
161 - 173 of 173 Posts
Top