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How do you feel about it? We have finally found a breeder we like and are in the process of completing the application/deposit stage. One of the questions they ask is whether you want to have your dog spayed/neutered by their vet prior to 8 weeks (at their expense). If we choose no, the contract states that we have to wait until after 1 year to sterilize or their health guarantee is voided. Not sure why, as we were hoping to have it done around 6 months, which is what we did for our current dog. I'm fine with the pediatric spay/neuter if it's fine for the dog, but I don't know enough about it.

Why would they put the one year stipulation in if they offer pediatric neutering/spaying? Would you have your dog spayed/neutered before 8 weeks, and why or why not?
 

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I would not have my dog spayed or neutered before 8 weeks of age*, and the part about making you wait a year doesn't make any sense to me whatsoever. But I'm not a breeder and there are more knowledgeable people on this forum. I just felt like responding because it seemed kind of bizarre.

*but I don't have a reason for it, other than it just seems too young. I know for male dogs, you have to wait until the testicles descend, or it becomes a more major operation.
 

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I would never fix my dog before he/she is at least 8 mos and preferably one year old.

Your dog needs those hormones to fully develop and many new research papers show benefits of "later neutering and spaying". That is why they want you to wait for a year or they will void their health warranty - hence they think that fixing early can cause some health problems.

BUT, I do not understand than why they are PRO pediatric "fixing" :doh:

PS: Your Avatar is adorable : )))
 

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I think pediatric spay/neuter is very risky for many reasons (including anesthesia), especially in med/large breeds. It makes no sense to offer spay/neuter at 8 weeks, but say speutering before 1yr voids the health contract. I would be leary of that breeder, their logic is off, IMO. And if it's off about that, what else?
 

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Agreed with everyone above. They advocate pediatric speutering, yet if you don't do it, you have to wait to a year? Seems strange to me.
 

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At first glance this seems extreme. Olie was neutered with in week of birth BUT he had to have surgery on a problem thus they did both at the same time. (thank God no problems)

I dont know for a fact on the risks although some make sence - being put under just for that, but if it is that risky why would a vet do it, is my curiousity?

True story- our vet told us to have ours done anytime after 12 weeks, I did Coco around 20 weeks or so and Aoki at 7 months. The vet claimed that especially with females early spay reduses the risks of canser - this was not me the vet. IDK, very interesting topic.
 
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How do you feel about it? We have finally found a breeder we like and are in the process of completing the application/deposit stage. One of the questions they ask is whether you want to have your dog spayed/neutered by their vet prior to 8 weeks (at their expense). If we choose no, the contract states that we have to wait until after 1 year to sterilize or their health guarantee is voided. Not sure why, as we were hoping to have it done around 6 months, which is what we did for our current dog. I'm fine with the pediatric spay/neuter if it's fine for the dog, but I don't know enough about it.

Why would they put the one year stipulation in if they offer pediatric neutering/spaying? Would you have your dog spayed/neutered before 8 weeks, and why or why not?
This sounds like the same breeder I went thru last year and when I didn't agree to her pediatric spay I believe to this day that she sent me a puppy from a different litter then what I purchased from
 

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I absolutely, positively disagree with the idea of pediatric spaying and neutering. The dogs need the hormones to grow to be all they can be. When I see video on some breeder sites of puppies just home from the vet after the entire litter is done, my stomach turns. In all honesty, it reminds me of concentration camps. The males never grow to be muscular and solid like males should be. I find the practice disgusting. Sorry if this offends anyone.
 

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Vets give bad advice all the time, especially when they can make money off of it. How many still prescribe Heartguard to Collies? I had one vet give me promeris for my cats and another vet, at the same clinic, told me it was bad for cats and they didn't even sell it. Sure enough the display was sitting in the lobby. Look at all the vets that sign off on health certificates for sickly petstore puppies. If a large scale breeder wants something done, how many vet are really going to say no and risk losing their business and any potential business from their puppy buyers? And on the reverse how many vets ignore knowledgable small scale breeders when it comes to breed specific issues?
 

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Not all vets.
There is no way in hell my boss would do a pediatric spay/neuter, nor would he ever give Heartgard or any other ivermectin to a Collie.
There are still some good vets out there, but unfortunately there are a lot of money motivated ones too.

I asked the local humane society's vet why they did pediatric spay and neuter, and he said "That way we know it will be done, the owner has no choice, and if the animal dies, well they're no one's pet yet anyway."
 

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I can't understand the logic of making you agree to wait until a year old... BUT, I don't agree with altering a dog so young either. I dunno what to think about that breeder? Perhaps she has a good reason similar to the one Wishpoo stated, however you shouldn't *have* to wait a whole year to do it. I think if they are going to intrust you with one of their puppies then they should be able to intrust you with all the information they can give you and allow you and your vet to make your own choice on when to alter.

My contract states that you have up to one year to alter your puppy, and I leave it up to you on when to do it since you really have to jump through hoops to get a puppy from me in the first place, which *usually* weeds out less than desireable homes. I breed smaller dogs though so it isn't quite the same as say a spoo.

I have yet to spay my girl spoo Saleen who just turned a year old. She is the first larger breed puppy I've ever raised so I was thinking on letting her grow up and go through one season and then start thining about spaying her.
 

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I know that many large SPCA's do young spaying a neutering and it seams to be working for them.

Personally I think altering between 4 and 6 months is ideal as its no to young and no to old.

Now to have a breeder say they will pay to do it before you get it or make you wait and you pay for it after I year sound odd to me. Why even give you the option?
 

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Now to have a breeder say they will pay to do it before you get it or make you wait and you pay for it after I year sound odd to me. Why even give you the option?
That just occurred to me too which is why I re-visted this thread. I would be interested in hearing the breeder's take on this. I've only ever spay/neutered dogs for people when they have been retired dogs or rescues and it's usually at the adopters expense, or they cover at least half of the cost. Is an already spay/neutered puppy priced any differently?

I'm curious too why they would give you the choice if they are so keen to do it for you at their expense?

What kind of registration are you getting? If I was so concerned about altering pet puppies that I was willing to do it prior to 8 weeks old I would probably be of the mind set that NOT doing it for you would perhaps encourage you to try and breed your dog at some point because really once the dog leaves, unless for some reason I retain ownership somehow which is a shakey deal at best to be honest, I cannot 100% control what you do with your puppy. A signed contract is just a piece of paper afterall when it's all said and done and no matter what action I can/do take against you after a breach doesn't change the fact that you indeed broke the agreement.
 

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I can see the case for pediatric neuters in the case of shelters and rescues. They really have no way to enforce speutering, as those dogs can't be registered with a kennel club. Plus I truly believe it's for the greater good in that case. Anything to help reduce the number of dogs who need homes.

However, when it comes to getting a dog from a breeder, I personally believe that breeder should be doing a good enough screening of potential homes that they can be comfortable that the home will follow the terms of the contract. I personally think that as long as it is done within a specified time frame that it should be up to the individual dog owner when it is actually done.

On a kind of similar note, I recently saw a contract where the health guarantee was only valid if you fed the food specified by the breeder for life. I thought that was ridiculous, as it was just some dry kibble brand. We feed our dogs raw so the health contract would be nullified? Seems silly to me.
 

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I would not have my dog spayed/neutered before 6 months of age. Especially not at or prior to 8 weeks of age, that is just dangerous.

But mainly because I have had a few dogs in my time and they seem to handle it best around 6 months of age, as far as good easy recovery and quick recovery, and how well they do in general.

My Terrier mix was a rescue and when we adopted her she was too young to be spayed and the adoption contract was that she had to be spayed by 6 months of age and they gave us a date it had to be done by and our vet had to send that in to them or the rescue had the right to take the dog back. Only problem was the dog was younger than rescue thought. Our vet determined she was not even 5 months old on the day of her spay and wasn't going to do it, but due to the contract the vet went ahead, against her better judgement, and spayed her at that time.

She had a tough recovery and it seemed to take longer (the recovery that is). She just had a real hard time with it. Now granted it could have just been the dog. But again I prefer 6 months of age or older to have a dog spayed or neutered but we don't always have a choice in the matter.


But I would never have a dog spayed or neutered as young as 8 weeks.


Are you sure she didn't mean if you didn't go with the pediatric spay/neuter you needed to have the dog spayed/neutered before a year of age? And not after? Because that sounds more likely.

Just a thought
 

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Not all vets.
I asked the local humane society's vet why they did pediatric spay and neuter, and he said "That way we know it will be done, the owner has no choice, and if the animal dies, well they're no one's pet yet anyway."
Thats not always the case. Our humane society and the rescue my Terrier mix was adopted from do it differently. At our humane society the dog isn't spayed/neutered until the dog is adopted. The rescue, is the same way unless the dog is under 4 months of age when adopted, in that case a spay agreement is signed.

So those dogs are already someones pets. And it sucks if you adopt a dog and go to pick it up and are told it died in surgery.

The rescue wanted us to go through a humane society spay clinic and so we went up there and got signed up and they told us, that if harm comes to the dog they can't be sued and made us sign all these wavers....and then they said they didn't have the ability to resuciate a dog if they lost it so that would be that.

I took my dog and got the Hell out of there as quickly as possibly (Probably faster than I have done anything before in my life) and set her spay up with our vet. Now our local humane society has a vet they work with down the street that has a practice so all their dogs before they go home if they aren't already spayed or neutered get sent their, they are spayed/neutered and their new owner picks them up there. (Unless the new owner prefers their own vet to do the surgery)

And I like that.

But to reply to what you were told, around here atleast they are already someones pet
 

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I can see the case for pediatric neuters in the case of shelters and rescues. They really have no way to enforce speutering, as those dogs can't be registered with a kennel club. Plus I truly believe it's for the greater good in that case. Anything to help reduce the number of dogs who need homes.

However, when it comes to getting a dog from a breeder, I personally believe that breeder should be doing a good enough screening of potential homes that they can be comfortable that the home will follow the terms of the contract. I personally think that as long as it is done within a specified time frame that it should be up to the individual dog owner when it is actually done.

On a kind of similar note, I recently saw a contract where the health guarantee was only valid if you fed the food specified by the breeder for life. I thought that was ridiculous, as it was just some dry kibble brand. We feed our dogs raw so the health contract would be nullified? Seems silly to me.
Couldn't agree more! Rescue/shelters are completely different, they don't bring the dog into this world and they don't always have the resources to screen adoptors and follow up to find out if the pet was speutered. For them I think pediatric spay/neuter is a neccessary "evil". (Not that I think the practice is really evil.) They need to get the pet into a good home so they can make room for the next one.
 

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Couldn't agree more! Rescue/shelters are completely different, they don't bring the dog into this world and they don't always have the resources to screen adoptors and follow up to find out if the pet was speutered. For them I think pediatric spay/neuter is a neccessary "evil". (Not that I think the practice is really evil.) They need to get the pet into a good home so they can make room for the next one.
I still have to disagree with that. Being the owner of an adopted rescue dog. I mean I don't know how they do it outside of my area, but around here I am happy they either do the spay agreement or wait until the dog is adopted.

I'm so glad we had the freedom to use our own vet. Ofcourse the rescue we went through follows up with its adopters (they didn't have an actual shelter all dogs were in foster homes)

I don't feel its a good idea before 12 weeks of age. Personally I don't feel its a good idea before 6 months of age. After seeing what my poor baby went though at 4 months of age getting spayed. And honestly she probably would have been bigger and less awkward if she wasn't spayed so early. Or so our current vet said.

Needless to say I feel a good old Spay/Neuter agreement is the way to go. There are a lot less problems with waiting until the dog is atleast 6 months old or older that will arise in a dog. Than if the dog is spayed too young

That being said, again atleast the dogs are being spayed or neutered and I can live with 12 weeks or older in a rescue/shelter type situation (espeically if the dog has been spayed/neutered before I adopt it, but if it hasn't I prefer my vet to do the spay/neuter and at a safe time)

but in the OPs case 8 weeks or younger is rediculous and not safe at all
 
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