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Paris, 10 years old, Standard Poodle — Petunia, 16 years old, English spot rabbit— Two anoles, 4ys
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve had a rescue poodle for almost my entire life, but recently my family and I decided to get a poodle puppy on top of our rescue girl. However, we have never gotten a dog from a breeder so we are kind of clueless. If anyone knows any standard parti poodle breeders in the Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina area, preferably with puppies already, please let me know. :)
 

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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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I would reach out to Gloria at Tintlet as a first step. She has shifted from standards to minis but can point you to reputable parti breeders in the region. As a bonus, Gloria was an active member here for many years.
 

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Tintlet would be top on my recommendation list as well.

It's important to be very careful when searching for parti breeders. Parti is a bit of a fad right now. A lot of unsavory breeders have hopped in because they see $$$. Parti is not approved in the AKC standard, so anyone who is deliberately breeding for parti has made a conscious choice to work outside the AKC guidelines. Any time someone deviates from one set of guidelines you need to ask what other guidelines they also deviate from. Sometimes parti breeders hook up with UKC, which is a legitimate registry that has multi-colored conformation classes in shows, and do everything a good breeder would do to further the breed. Others don't. I personally would be very skeptical of any parti breeder who is offering CKC registration. (Continental Kennel Club, that is. Canadian Kennel Club is totally legit.)
Some breeders I would check out include:
Shyre - Ohio
MyTyme - Ohio
Moonrise - South Carolina (mini/moyen/small standard)
Perigeaux Ohio (has one parti dam)
Raven Rock - Maryland
Jacknic - Michigan
Rose City - Texas
Cosmic Caliber - Kentucky
Crystal Creek - Indiana
Apricity - Pennsylvania
 

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I want to second what Cowpony said. People who deliberately breed away from the standard commonly do not do testing for genetic diseases. I have no real opposition to parti-color since it has been around for centuries, but I suspect other deviations from solid color are likely to have been introduced by crossing to other breeds.
 

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Epic Quest Standard Poodles (epicqueststandardpoodles.com) just had a parti litter and they are in Petersburg, VA. The sire of the litter is from Crystal Creek (mentioned by cowpony). Last I knew, they still had some open spots for puppy applications, but you would have to check with them.
 

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I wouldn't say there is a 1:1 relationship between color breeders and bad breeding practices. The mid-Century bottleneck certainly wasn't caused by color breeders, and color breeders like Jacknic have been part of the Betterbred initiative to try to mitigate the damage. However, any fad in dog breeding - doodles, reds, parti, moyens - has a tendency to attract carpet baggers looking for a quick buck instead of people asking if what they're doing now is going to improve the breed four generations out. Who knows, maybe there will be a fad for "chocolate" poodles ten years from now, and we will be cautioning everyone to be careful with brown breeders: "It might just be an apricot with poor quality color!"
 

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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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All of the top parti breeders I know breed partis and solids, because they're looking for the best traits irrespective of parti genes, not targeting a cacophony of color. A gigantic red flag is a litter that has blacks, browns, and reds, and another is a lack of pictures of solids anywhere on the website. IMHO, if I were looking for a dog, I would confidently support a quality parti breeder and be happy with the dog that fit my household, whether parti or solid.
 

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I'll add to the recommendations to talk to Gloria at Tintlet. We 've had one of her silver and white partis for seven years, since he was nine weeks old. He's a beautiful dog, very bright and happy. She can certainly give you good advice.
 

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You mentioned that this will be your first experience in selecting a quality, conscientious breeder. All the suggestions above are very good. I'm adding some tips, some things to consider, and some things to avoid.

As you contact the breeders listed above, you'll see them exemplify the info below.

You'll likely find more parti breeders in the UKC since they can show in conformation there, albeit separate from the solid color poodles.

Gooddog.com has a separate section for what they call "Poodle (Non-standard). Don't take the health testing for granted. Verify all and focus on those that are following the PCA recommended health testing.

We often hear from folks that they just want a pet. What doesn't seem to be common knowledge is that the kind of quality, conscientious breeders I, for one, prefer to support are always breeding for the very best poodles they can. It isn't pet puppy vs show puppy, it's lucky us, the ones wanting a pet who get the pups that have some small "fault" that might reduce their chances of winning competitions, but are flawless to us :).

It's not unusual to think that there are possibly thousands of breeders to choose from. For quality, conscientious breeders, that number is more likely only in the hundreds in the US. A bottom line difference is between those who're breeding primarily for profit and those who're breeding because they feel not only love for poodles but an obligation to the entire breed.

About reviews, a happy owner doesn't necessarily mean an informed owner. It's as likely they've just been lucky, so far. Review any negative comments carefully, if they're allowed to appear.

Getting a puppy from a quality, conscientious breeder is something like insurance. Their investment in the health, welfare, and soundness of all the dogs in their care including he puppies they offer to new homes is part of the reason you're not likely to find a less than $2000 USD puppy from them.

The saying is "pay the breeder or pay the vet". Price alone isn't the only thing to separate quality breeders from those less than. We've seen members quote as high and even much higher pricing for pups from parents not health tested, not proven to meet breed standards, sold as purebred when only a DNA test could determine that since they may be sold without registration papers.

Health testing of the breeding parents is a good indicator of a quality, conscientious breeder. The Breeder List has info on what to look for in the testing for each variety. Mentioning health testing on a site is nice but isn't proof. For proof, look for health testing results spelled out on the breeder's site, then verify for yourself by going to the site the results are published on. If you don't find any evidence of testing or can't find the info but the breeder appeals to you, contact them and ask where you might see the testing they do. Reputable breeders put in a lot of effort to make sure they're breeding the healthiest poodles and will be happy to talk about it and provide the info.

Look for and verify OFA/CHIC level testing at a minimum. There are also poodle specific DNA panels for those testable conditions. Those are companion testing with the OFA/CHIC testing.
Look Up A Dog | Orthopedic Foundation for Animals | Columbia, MO (ofa.org)


A caution that a health "guarantee" on a puppy doesn't have much to back it if the sire and dam were not given the testing for breed and variety. "Guarantees" without the testing often favor the breeder, more than the buyer.

Read thru any contracts that may be listed. If they rule out coverage for conditions that the breeding pair should or could have been tested for, consider that a caution flag. Otherwise, are the terms clear to you and can you live with them?

Conscientious breeders have a waitlist at the best of times and with pandemic puppy seekers, that wait is stretched well into 2021-2022. There have been more than a few serendipitous contacts between seeker and breeder, so don't be put off by the thought of a waitlist. Also, don't be put off if online sites aren't particularly updated. As often as not, breeders may prefer communicating by phone as well as email or text, and are busy with their dogs rather than keep a website updated.

When you start making contacts, let them know if you're open to an older pup or young adult.

Color preferences are understandable but keep in mind that you're limiting your options even further in a very limited supply of puppies. That beautiful color you fell for may not look the same in a few weeks, or months, or years.

Temperament and personality are lifelong traits.

Be prepared to spend in the range of $2000 to $3500 USD. Conscientious breeders are not padding pricing due to Covid.

Be prepared to travel outside your preferred area.

As a very general rule, websites to be leery of are those that feature cutesy puppies with bows and such, little or no useful info on sires or dams, the word "Order" or "Ordering" (these are living beings, not appliances) and a PayPal or "pay here" button prominently featured "for your convenience".


An excellent source for breeder referrals is your local or the regional or national Poodle Club. An online search for "Poodle Club of ___ (your city or state)" will find them. You can also go directly to the national club site.

Some Poodle Club links are in the Breeder List.


As a sort of checklist of things to look for or ask, this is my personal criteria (I have another more detailed but just this for now):

My criteria need not be yours but I think it's important for a potential poodle owner to understand why these things matter in finding a conscientious breeder and to get a well bred puppy to share life with for many years to come. Simply being advertised as "registered" or even "purebred" doesn't mean that a puppy is well bred.


Every one of these is a talking point a conscientious breeder will welcome, just not all at the same time :)

My ideal breeder is someone who is doing this because they love the breed.
They want to see each new generation born at least as good as the previous, ideally better.
They provide for every dog in their care as if that dog is their own.
They will be there for the new family, and stand behind that pup for it's lifetime, rain or shine, with or without a contract.
They will know the standards and pedigrees of their chosen breed, health and genetic diversity of their lines, and breed to better them.
They will know of the latest studies in health standards for their chosen breed and variety and do the health testing of their breeding dogs.
They prove their dogs meet breed standards and are physically capable by breeding from sires and dams proven in competition or participating in other activities.
They do not cross breed.
They will have as many questions for me as I do for them.
They invest in their dogs. They don't expect the dogs to support them.
 

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Paris, 10 years old, Standard Poodle — Petunia, 16 years old, English spot rabbit— Two anoles, 4ys
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I’ve had a rescue poodle for almost my entire life, but recently my family and I decided to get a poodle puppy on top of our rescue girl. However, we have never gotten a dog from a breeder so we are kind of clueless. If anyone knows any standard parti poodle breeders in the Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina area, preferably with puppies already, please let me know. :)
Thank you for all of the suggestions! This was very helpful.
I‘ll definitely reach out to Tintlet for some referrals and other advise.
 
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