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Go Greyhound:) Sweet, sweet coach potatoes. I don't think a Standard, intact male is a good match at all. Maybe you can do some dog sitting while you consider options.
 

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I love greyhounds and that might be a good option for you. Or even the smaller Italian greyhound. We see a lot of people traveling in RVs with both breeds and when I've asked, both breeds have been described as mellow couch potatoes who just want to hang out with their human.

Having said that, I totally understand your affection for poodles. ?
 

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As an owner of a young intact male spoo I cannot imagine such a dog being a good match for you Pamela. Javelin is like a tank, very powerful and full of go any time, any where. Only now at 15 months old do I consider him to be the beginning of civilized. I am very sure that he could readily pull many people off their feet if they weren't prepared for his strength. That boy that Joan Alexander has would be highly unlikely to be right for you, especially since he will remain intact.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
How far north from the border is the Canadian dog? Is the border halfway? Could you meet them and the dog there?
I would have to go and meet them and then after they approved me I would have to go and get the dog
 

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Greyhounds shed more than other short coated dogs as their coat is very soft and almost plush. But this is about how much hair comes off my short coated dane when I run my hand over his back.


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Good point - shedding is definitely relative. I grew up with big, double-coated herding breeds (for a while we had a husky/shepherd mix and a great pyrenees at the same time), so to me nothing seems to shed that much! :laugh:
 

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I didn't know we needed passports to go to Canada. Obvi, I haven't been in a while.
Not so much that you need them to get into Canada. We were quite happy with sliding back and forth across the border without much fuss. And even now, you could probably get up here just fine.

BUT! Homeland Security now decrees that you need them to get back home.
 

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I would have to go and meet them and then after they approved me I would have to go and get the dog
Would they be willing to meet you at the border? Can you do skype or another type of video chat for your interview with them? When we adopted Cleo, the rescue did everything via phone initially, and then gave their final approval when we actually met her in person.
 

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Sorry for the double post, but at two and neutered Buck is a lotta dog. He ran into me some time ago and I was airborne! I would want a much older Standard if I was set on the size.
 

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As for the border requirements, yes, you need either a passport or an "enhanced" drivers license.

With technology, maybe they could do a Skype or FaceTime interview. But I also think meeting the dog in persons would be important.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
A 1 year old large breed dog is a lot of work. Pamela if your patient, you'll find your dog, I promise you. There is a dog with more maturity who has a broken heart and is just waiting for his forever home. Find that dog Pamela......


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I think I will in time - I will be patient - thanks
 

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You’ve been given some good advice so far, and I’ll try not to repeat what has been said before me.

I agree with others, Pamela, that you need to think long and hard about what you can offer a dog, and then choose an appropriate dog for what you’re offering. There’s one out there, I’m sure of that, but it might not be what you’ve been previously looking for.

Take it from me, someone who has both rehomed AND adopted a dog.

Questions to ask yourself:
- If your dog is young and strong, will you be able to control him on a leash? What if you’re taking a walk and your dog sees a rabbit and decides to run after it. Could you redirect your dog or have enough strength to restrain him? If you lose control of the leash, can you guarantee your dog will have enough obedience training to return when you recall?
- If you get a young dog, will you have the energy levels to keep up with him/her? Keeping in mind that what you described as high-energy from Teddy sounds pretty normal to me. Riley gets at least a 1-mile walk a day, 3 high-intensity ball-fetching sessions, a trick training session, and usually some agility training per day. He’s 2, for reference
- You mentioned that Patches would get into corners of your yard where you were unable to reach him and it was dangerous to him. A big dog is equally capable of digging in those sections. A young one is a lot less likely to listen, or need a lot more training.

When we surrendered Oliver, it took me a few months before I was ready for another dog. When I was, every dog I saw on Petfinder that sort-of fit what I was looking for convinced me it was the dog for me. Here’s the thing. You might think that the dog on Petfinder (Ella) is perfect for you… except that she’s in Canada and 6 hrs away. In my mind, that means she’s not perfect for you. You need to be patient and the right dog will come. No, pure-bred poodles don’t end up in shelters often, but they do end up in them more than you would think. Based on what you have told us about your lifestyle, I agree with others that if you’re set on a poodle, a retired breeder girl would probably be a good companion for you. Our little Riley was a shelter dog and I love him to pieces, and I will always tell people that rescue dogs are wonderful, but they aren’t without work. When we got him, Riley was terrified of grooming, had a laundry list of things he was scared of (including strangers, strange places, garbage cans, weird noises, brooms, anything on a stick… the list goes on). He had zero previous training and weird food issues which meant we spent a lot of time, money, stress, and worry trying to find a food he would eat.

We’re coming up on 10 months post-adoption and Riley is a fabulous dog and family member. But it would be foolish of me to point this out without explaining the work that went into making him comfortable in our home. Every dog will be work, but having Ginger you know this. Finding a more relaxed, laid-back dog will probably be the right amount of work for you to handle.

If you are lonely, while you wait for your next furry companion, may I suggest you volunteer as a dog walker at a local shelter? Our shelters are constantly looking for people to play with and walk the dogs. Not only will this be very fulfilling work, and greatly benefit the dogs, but it might also allow you to see more dog breeds (quite a few of which don’t shed).
 

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Discussion Starter #58
You’ve been given some good advice so far, and I’ll try not to repeat what has been said before me.

I agree with others, Pamela, that you need to think long and hard about what you can offer a dog, and then choose an appropriate dog for what you’re offering. There’s one out there, I’m sure of that, but it might not be what you’ve been previously looking for.

Take it from me, someone who has both rehomed AND adopted a dog.

Questions to ask yourself:
- If your dog is young and strong, will you be able to control him on a leash? What if you’re taking a walk and your dog sees a rabbit and decides to run after it. Could you redirect your dog or have enough strength to restrain him? If you lose control of the leash, can you guarantee your dog will have enough obedience training to return when you recall?
- If you get a young dog, will you have the energy levels to keep up with him/her? Keeping in mind that what you described as high-energy from Teddy sounds pretty normal to me. Riley gets at least a 1-mile walk a day, 3 high-intensity ball-fetching sessions, a trick training session, and usually some agility training per day. He’s 2, for reference
- You mentioned that Patches would get into corners of your yard where you were unable to reach him and it was dangerous to him. A big dog is equally capable of digging in those sections. A young one is a lot less likely to listen, or need a lot more training.

When we surrendered Oliver, it took me a few months before I was ready for another dog. When I was, every dog I saw on Petfinder that sort-of fit what I was looking for convinced me it was the dog for me. Here’s the thing. You might think that the dog on Petfinder (Ella) is perfect for you… except that she’s in Canada and 6 hrs away. In my mind, that means she’s not perfect for you. You need to be patient and the right dog will come. No, pure-bred poodles don’t end up in shelters often, but they do end up in them more than you would think. Based on what you have told us about your lifestyle, I agree with others that if you’re set on a poodle, a retired breeder girl would probably be a good companion for you. Our little Riley was a shelter dog and I love him to pieces, and I will always tell people that rescue dogs are wonderful, but they aren’t without work. When we got him, Riley was terrified of grooming, had a laundry list of things he was scared of (including strangers, strange places, garbage cans, weird noises, brooms, anything on a stick… the list goes on). He had zero previous training and weird food issues which meant we spent a lot of time, money, stress, and worry trying to find a food he would eat.

We’re coming up on 10 months post-adoption and Riley is a fabulous dog and family member. But it would be foolish of me to point this out without explaining the work that went into making him comfortable in our home. Every dog will be work, but having Ginger you know this. Finding a more relaxed, laid-back dog will probably be the right amount of work for you to handle.

If you are lonely, while you wait for your next furry companion, may I suggest you volunteer as a dog walker at a local shelter? Our shelters are constantly looking for people to play with and walk the dogs. Not only will this be very fulfilling work, and greatly benefit the dogs, but it might also allow you to see more dog breeds (quite a few of which don’t shed).
very good points! thank you so much! I will be patient and wait for the right dog and the volunteer thing may work - a little far but I will see. I am going to volunteer for my daughter at her office when she goes back to work.

The yard was bad for little Patches cause he was a toy and I couldnt reach him to get him out from under the pool deckl - lol when I finally got him he came out with the cutest dirty face! lol but that was never a problem with Ginger - but you are right - I must find out if the dog is a digger. Also he was going up in the rock garden and I couldnt climb the hill to get him - he was so little he was lost in the weeds (can't do that garden anymore lol) and hardly could see him - lots of loose rocks and I was fearful that he would tumble. However her amazed me the first time he climb the ledge! straight up with a slight curve and he was able to scale it! I was amazed! lol of course ginger and teddy never had a problem with the yard. they raced up and down - king and queen of the hill. He is going to be so surprised not to find her here when he comes for a visit.

You are right - the girl in Canada is not right for me - my daughter told me also - I will be patient! I promised her! lol no jumping into anything quickly.

thanks again for your concern!
Pam
 

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Discussion Starter #59
You’ve been given some good advice so far, and I’ll try not to repeat what has been said before me.

I agree with others, Pamela, that you need to think long and hard about what you can offer a dog, and then choose an appropriate dog for what you’re offering. There’s one out there, I’m sure of that, but it might not be what you’ve been previously looking for.

Take it from me, someone who has both rehomed AND adopted a dog.

Questions to ask yourself:
- If your dog is young and strong, will you be able to control him on a leash? What if you’re taking a walk and your dog sees a rabbit and decides to run after it. Could you redirect your dog or have enough strength to restrain him? If you lose control of the leash, can you guarantee your dog will have enough obedience training to return when you recall?
- If you get a young dog, will you have the energy levels to keep up with him/her? Keeping in mind that what you described as high-energy from Teddy sounds pretty normal to me. Riley gets at least a 1-mile walk a day, 3 high-intensity ball-fetching sessions, a trick training session, and usually some agility training per day. He’s 2, for reference
- You mentioned that Patches would get into corners of your yard where you were unable to reach him and it was dangerous to him. A big dog is equally capable of digging in those sections. A young one is a lot less likely to listen, or need a lot more training.

When we surrendered Oliver, it took me a few months before I was ready for another dog. When I was, every dog I saw on Petfinder that sort-of fit what I was looking for convinced me it was the dog for me. Here’s the thing. You might think that the dog on Petfinder (Ella) is perfect for you… except that she’s in Canada and 6 hrs away. In my mind, that means she’s not perfect for you. You need to be patient and the right dog will come. No, pure-bred poodles don’t end up in shelters often, but they do end up in them more than you would think. Based on what you have told us about your lifestyle, I agree with others that if you’re set on a poodle, a retired breeder girl would probably be a good companion for you. Our little Riley was a shelter dog and I love him to pieces, and I will always tell people that rescue dogs are wonderful, but they aren’t without work. When we got him, Riley was terrified of grooming, had a laundry list of things he was scared of (including strangers, strange places, garbage cans, weird noises, brooms, anything on a stick… the list goes on). He had zero previous training and weird food issues which meant we spent a lot of time, money, stress, and worry trying to find a food he would eat.

We’re coming up on 10 months post-adoption and Riley is a fabulous dog and family member. But it would be foolish of me to point this out without explaining the work that went into making him comfortable in our home. Every dog will be work, but having Ginger you know this. Finding a more relaxed, laid-back dog will probably be the right amount of work for you to handle.

If you are lonely, while you wait for your next furry companion, may I suggest you volunteer as a dog walker at a local shelter? Our shelters are constantly looking for people to play with and walk the dogs. Not only will this be very fulfilling work, and greatly benefit the dogs, but it might also allow you to see more dog breeds (quite a few of which don’t shed).

by the way - Riley is adorable! is he a mini or spoo? he looks like a large mini or a small spoo. lol very cute
 

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by the way - Riley is adorable! is he a mini or spoo? he looks like a large mini or a small spoo. lol very cute
He's a mini on the top end of the scale - coming in at 14.25lbs and 15" at the shoulders. It is a good size - he's small enough I can scoop him up and carry him, but he doesn't feel fragile like a smaller tpoo might.

Hugs to you Pamela, your dog is out there somewhere, you'll see :)
 
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