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I am a little leery about buying a spoo from someone that is not a breeder. She is selling a beautiful cream baby - one year old - sounds perfect but why is she selling her? I emailed and asked. The only clue is that she drinks a lot of water - wonder if she has diabetes? any thoughts?
 

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Did you just rehome a poo? If so, isn't another one going to be work that you can't do? If you're going to, take the dog to the vet prior to purchasing. I'd be a bit leary about getting a dog that pees a lot without a medical exam.
 

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Did you just rehome a poo? If so, isn't another one going to be work that you can't do? If you're going to, take the dog to the vet prior to purchasing. I'd be a bit leary about getting a dog that pees a lot without a medical exam.
yes I rehomed a very small puppy that I could not handle and who was getting into trouble in the yard where I could not rescue him. I need a bigger dog like my Ginger - an adult. I am wondering what is wrong with the dog also.
 

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Total red flag for health problems, plus 1 year old is still a puppy! Maizie is still super energetic and high maintenance at 16 mos.
yes I totally agree. I found a poodle at a rescue site that I really love - she reminds me of my girl - but she is in Canada and I dont have a passport! darn - she is around 6 hours away which is ok - my daughter has a passport but just got out of the hospital. oh well here is her link. her name is Ella and she is about 5 https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/35625426
 

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A one year old spoo is still a puppy. For that matter Javelin, who just turned 15 months old over the weekend, is still a puppy. The health concerns that might be hiding there are a big red flag for me too.

Pamela I know you miss Ginger and that you want to have a dog, but I don't think this is the dog for you. You also need to consider the issues of your own health in all of this. What will happen to the dog if something happens to you? My dog training mentor had adopted a six year old mpoo a couple of years ago. Last year she fell and spent months in rehab and has since had other hospital and rehab time. She has given the dog to another member of our club who is in good health. It is sad for my mentor, but it was right (although hard) for the dog. I am in my mid/late 50s and I have 180 pounds worth of dogs in my home. It is not for the faint of heart and decisions about having a dog or other companion animals have to account for the well being of the animal(s) and not just satisfy the desires of the people involved. I know you understand this since you did a very courageous and generous thing in realizing that the best things for Patches was a re-home.
 

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A one year old spoo is still a puppy. For that matter Javelin, who just turned 15 months old over the weekend, is still a puppy. The health concerns that might be hiding there are a big red flag for me too.

Pamela I know you miss Ginger and that you want to have a dog, but I don't think this is the dog for you. You also need to consider the issues of your own health in all of this. What will happen to the dog if something happens to you? My dog training mentor had adopted a six year old mpoo a couple of years ago. Last year she fell and spent months in rehab and has since had other hospital and rehab time. She has given the dog to another member of our club who is in good health. It is sad for my mentor, but it was right (although hard) for the dog. I am in my mid/late 50s and I have 180 pounds worth of dogs in my home. It is not for the faint of heart and decisions about having a dog or other companion animals have to account for the well being of the animal(s) and not just satisfy the desires of the people involved. I know you understand this since you did a very courageous and generous thing in realizing that the best things for Patches was a re-home.
do you think I should not get an older dog either? dont want to do the wrong thing.
 

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Hi Pamela

It's so hard isn't it when we are used to having our dog companion around us, isn't it? So many of us have been there.

You could do a wonderful thing, both for a lovely dog, and for yourself, by adopting a more senior dog. Quite a bit older than a year, as LilyCD said. My late Hecuba was eight when I adopted her and she lived until she was just about to reach 16. She was ten pounds, and I think was either a cross-bred toy or mini...a lot of personality, liked to run around a bit but didn't require a lot of exercise. Do you think someone around the size of Patches, but a lot more cuddly and less energetic? Such dogs are out there, and need you, too, and if you can manage to wait a bit, and keep looking, I'll bet you can find him or her...

You want someone that you are not going to trip over, and who will like to sit on your lap...

Keep us posted, please!
 

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Pamela I am not trying to tell you what to do, just saying for all of us that it is important for us (the humans) to be realistic about what we want, what we need and what we can do justice to. It has to be fair for the animal(s) and all of the people concerned.

When my mom got her mpoo a few people said they thought she should have gotten a spoo since she (my mom that is) is rather tall. Her boy is a small mini and now that she is trying her hand at rally advanced (off leash) the distance between her face and his is very big and for that a spoo might be better, but she wanted a companion that would be fun and cuddly as she was approaching 80. On that basis he is the right dog for her. She doesn't have a fenced yard, so a spoo puppy would have been a very hard puppy for her. She took Javelin to her apartment when we were away in May and although he was very good for her while he was there (for about five days) she was very happy to give him back to me when we got home.
 

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the right dog is always the right choice. i personally like the idea of a retired show dog from a good breeder, mainly because a good breeder would be looking for a good retirement home for a beloved dog and be knowledgeable about matching temperament to your needs. never give up. someone is out there with the dog you need and who needs you.
 

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Pamela a year old is to much for you with your health problem I also think a Spoo is a lot to handle.

Below is the difference between a puppy and a dog of 3 years up. Sage the new one I have had for 6 weeks. Were I you I would be looking for a mini or toy, and as far as them tripping the owner, my toy all stay behind me, (I trained them not to go out a door ahead of me)and I did not train them to stay behind me in the house, gut they do. When I go from one room to the other all 3 are walking behind me. They go out the door behind me, the only time they go ahead of me, is if they are off leash outside and we are coming in the door, and I trained them to go in front so I do not forget one, and can keep an eye on them. They stay behind me until the door is open, I hold the screen and say go, and is also my new one of 6 weeks Sage.

Sage was retired from a breeder, now totally house broken, potty patch at night, outside (if I have time during the day). Lays in a bed in my office while I am on the computer, (other 2 lay under the desk). Understand NO, also so know not to go the to food bowl of one of the other dogs, knows go by-by.

My 86 year old aunt is her buddy, she get on the sofa with her and lays there and will not come to me unless I have cookies or something to eat, and my aunt loves it so it is fine with me. She will miss her awfully when Auntie goes home.

At my age I do not want a dog over 7 to 8 pound (prefer smaller) but could live with that, and I want no puppies.
 
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