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I'm very sorry you and your little Beau are going through this. Hopefully, someone here with experience will have more helpful information. What does his vet say to do to keep him comfortable? Will keep you both in my prayers.
 

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I’m so sorry.

Do you have any hospice vets? I used one for a cat who had polycystic kidney disease.

He was followed for several years by our regular vet. We switched to the hospice vet when it was clear that there was no more treatment and keeping him comfortable became the main goal. She came to the house so he didn’t suffer going to the vet. She had equipment and supplies to do most test to follow his progress. When it was time to say goodbye she put him to sleep in my arms in our family room surrounded by my other pets.
 
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I'm sorry to hear that you and Beau are traveling this difficult path. I haven't been thru this with my poodles but I'm sure your vet will guide you.

Please stay in touch.
 

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My lil toy poodle boy beau has cancer ,an aggressive oral tumour he is 17 and is currently on steroids along with antibiotics, however it seems to be causing pain the last two days I’m here to ask if anyone else has been going through a similar situation and what else may help him x
Our 12 year old (small) Standard poodle Ziggy was also just diagnosed with oral malignant melanoma. Our vet removed the superficial part of the tumor from his upper-right gum. He took antibiotics and pain meds immediately after that, but is not (at the moment) receiving other medical intervention. The veterinary oncologist said that the ONCEPT vaccine is not a practical option for us because the first step is to remove all of the existing tumor — I our case that would mean removing part of Ziggy’s upper jaw. We don’t want that for his end of life. The only thing I can think of that might slow the growth/regrow tu of the tumor is switching to an all-meat diet (according to some websites cancers feed on carbohydrates). We are luck in that Ziggy doesn’t seem to be experiencing any pain, etc. He’s just a happy guy that needs to stop losing weight. It may be a totally different story soon. Our family ver, the oncologist, and the internet have all said we’re looking at 3 to 6 more months (though he looks so good now that we might get a l couple extra weeks). It’s heartbreaking.
 

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The thing I found hardest when letting go of my 16 year old Mandi was when exactly to let go. She had congestive heart failure among other things, and I think I was hoping she just wouldn't wake up one morning. She would have good days and bad days. This was on and off for at least a year. I think she tried to tell me for a long time that she was ready to move on. I guess finally I got it and let her go. Nothing prepared me for the emotions that overtook me, but it wasn't the first time and it won't be the last.
 

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The thing I found hardest when letting go of my 16 year old Mandi was when exactly to let go. She had congestive heart failure among other things, and I think I was hoping she just wouldn't wake up one morning. She would have good days and bad days. This was on and off for at least a year. I think she tried to tell me for a long time that she was ready to move on. I guess finally I got it and let her go. Nothing prepared me for the emotions that overtook me, but it wasn't the first time and it won't be the last.
Exactly, Steve,
My fear is that I won’t be able to 1) realize that Ziggy is suffering or 2) make the hard decision when the time comes. I, too, keep hoping that he will simply fall asleep and not wake up.
 

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Making end of life decisions is always the hardest part of pet ownership, and I'm very sorry for those of you currently struggling with this. I cannot give any medical recommendations, but here are some thoughts regarding quality of life.

There is an in-depth quality of life scale called the HHHHHMM scale that can be helpful when determining when euthanasia needs to be considered . VCA also has a useful page that may help clarify things even further.

In general, what I talk about with my clients includes the big three: eating, drinking, and moving. If any of these are gone, then it is time to help our pet pass on. However, just because a pet is still doing those three things doesn't mean they have an adequate quality of life, which is where the different scales come into play. The HHHHHMM scale is the most in-depth I know of, but there are others out there as well. A simpler one is to pick either 3 or 5 things that your pet liked to do when they were at their best. Once they are not enjoying a majority of those things, it is usually time. Of course, those activities need to be scaled for age. If your dog loves hikes, they don't need to be going five miles at 15 years old. Just a short, happy walk down the block is their new equivalent. But if they either do not enjoy the walk or are unable to go out, that activity is no longer counted.

Another measure to look at, in my opinion, is body weight. At the end of life, we expect some weight loss, but we want to prevent our pets from reaching the point of starvation if they're just not able to eat enough calories to keep weight on. This is a good one to talk over with your vet, as each dog will have a different number to watch for.

Lastly, I am a firm believer in "better a week too early than a day too late." Very few clients tell me they regret euthanizing a beloved pet too early, but I have had many people feel conflicted about waiting too long. Better to let your pet experience one last, amazing day with family.

At my clinic, we offer what are called "quality of life" appointments. Some of these clients know that it is time for their pet, but for others it's a time for me to go over QOL scales and talk about palliative care. It may be worth a call to your vet to set up something similar to discuss additional pain management and other types of management plans.

My thoughts are with all of you!
 

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That's kind of you to say! I'd be happy to do another write up and expand on some things that aren't relevant to this thread and post it over there.
Thank you for your invaluable reflections. Especially your one day too late, is truly unbearable. It is truly selfless and loving to let go, however hard it is.
 

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My lil toy poodle boy beau has cancer ,an aggressive oral tumour he is 17 and is currently on steroids along with antibiotics, however it seems to be causing pain the last two days I’m here to ask if anyone else has been going through a similar situation and what else may help him x
I do not know what type of cancer. We lost our standard Rosie last Thanksgiving due to an aggressive melanoma on her gum. It was only the size of an eraser tip when we took her to a vet oncologist. This was extremely fast growing. We had to let her go after 4 1/2 weeks. By then it was the size of a half dollar or even larger. It was awful to watch a happy 9 1/2 year old pup go from very active to just laying on her bed.
 

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My lil toy poodle boy beau has cancer ,an aggressive oral tumour he is 17 and is currently on steroids along with antibiotics, however it seems to be causing pain the last two days I’m here to ask if anyone else has been going through a similar situation and what else may help him x
I'm so sorry. He's 17 years old? That is a gifted life. I went through cancer in the upper jaw/roof of mouth with my 12 year old German Shepherd. I did surgery for her on vet recommendation and prayers. She was terribly swollen afterwards and she had a lot of pain. Unfortunately, she wasn't cleared of the cancer. It traveled to her lungs. She did become herself for a little while longer, almost a year. Her breathing became an issue and she was extremely fatigued. I ended up having to let her go. She was born with a cleft palate. I had surgery to fix the cleft when she qualified for surgery as a pup. Age and weight had to be met. At 17, only you can know your baby. The only thing I can offer is to do the kind thing when you're both ready. I waited til Bren didn't want to eat or go out any longer. Sending love and prayers.
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'm so sorry. He's 17 years old? That is a gifted life. I went through cancer in the upper jaw/roof of mouth with my 12 year old German Shepherd. I did surgery for her on vet recommendation and prayers. She was terribly swollen afterwards and she had a lot of pain. Unfortunately, she wasn't cleared of the cancer. It traveled to her lungs. She did become herself for a little while longer, almost a year. Her breathing became an issue and she was extremely fatigued. I ended up having to let her go. She was born with a cleft palate. I had surgery to fix the cleft when she qualified for surgery as a pup. Age and weight had to be met. At 17, only you can know your baby. The only thing I can offer is to do the kind thing when you're both ready. I waited til Bren didn't want to eat or go out any longer. Sending love and prayers. View attachment 497817
Thank you for your reply to me however my darling Beau went to sleep yesterday afternoon, I am heartbroken as he has been our only one and was born a yr and a half before my son and my son will soon be 16 ! The house feels empty already, he’s been so strong and I feel sick today, I’m so sorry for your loss too, Kate
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I do not know what type of cancer. We lost our standard Rosie last Thanksgiving due to an aggressive melanoma on her gum. It was only the size of an eraser tip when we took her to a vet oncologist. This was extremely fast growing. We had to let her go after 4 1/2 weeks. By then it was the size of a half dollar or even larger. It was awful to watch a happy 9 1/2 year old pup go from very active to just laying on her bed.
Gosh that is young, my beau was diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma 8 weeks ago his was on his back gum and was big, the steroids helped for a bit then everything seemed to just stop working it started to bleed so yesterday beau went to sleep but that feeling of guilt is unbearable
 
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