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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone. I’m new to this forum. I currently have a 13 1/2-year-old toy poodle and she is in great health m. She has had eye issues for awhile, however over the past couple years her eyes have gotten worse and just recently I’ve noticed her lack of interest with going downstairs and on daily walks. I just didn’t know if anyone had any recommendations for supplements or natural remedies to help her with her vision?
 

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Our Aussie Terrier lost his vision when he was around 12. Other than stairs and sleeping in his bed instead of on the sofa, he did well in the house. In place of walks, we'd take him into the familiar backyard.
 

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Instead of walks, you could set up a backyard “sniffari.” Your poodle’s nose is like a second set of eyes. Let her use it as much as possible.

Indoors, keep things consistent. Water bowl in the same spot and easily accessible from a safe little bed that your girl can retreat to, chairs always tucked in, etc. Even something as simple as slippers left carelessly in the hallway can cause scary collisions and make her reluctant to move around.

My parents’ dachshund-poodle mix lost his sight gradually over many years and then abruptly went totally blind. When he still had partial sight, he was able to use bright light through doorways, etc. for navigation. But at night he got understandably nervous. To deal with that: Leashed potty walks only, ideally following the same route, at the same time, every evening. Even if it’s just to the back corner of the backyard and back.

If there are steps your girl absolutely must navigate, I wonder if LED light strips might help? But anything more than a single step or two, I’d gate off.

I’d also recommend regular checkups if she’s not already getting them. Some causes of vision impairment can be painful, which will increase her anxiety and lower the quality of her life.

As far as supplements go, I’d think that would depend on the cause of her vision loss. You could consult with a holistic vet or specialist for guidance. Maybe even remotely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Instead of walks, you could set up a backyard “sniffari.” Your poodle’s nose is like a second set of eyes. Let her use it as much as possible.

Indoors, keep things consistent. Water bowl in the same spot and easily accessible from a safe little bed that your girl can retreat to, chairs always tucked in, etc. Even something as simple as slippers left carelessly in the hallway can cause scary collisions and make her reluctant to move around.

My parents’ dachshund-poodle mix lost his sight gradually over many years and then abruptly went totally blind. When he still had partial sight, he was able to use bright light through doorways, etc. for navigation. But at night he got understandably nervous. To deal with that: Leashed potty walks only, ideally following the same route, at the same time, every evening. Even if it’s just to the back corner of the backyard and back.

If there are steps your girl absolutely must navigate, I wonder if LED light strips might help? But anything more than a single step or two, I’d gate off.

I’d also recommend regular checkups if she’s not already getting them. Some causes of vision impairment can be painful, which will increase her anxiety and lower the quality of her life.

As far as supplements go, I’d think that would depend on the cause of her vision loss. You could consult with a holistic vet or specialist for guidance. Maybe even remotely.
Thank you so much for the feedback. I love the ‘sniffari’ idea. We have a big enough yard, she could be busy for days.
 

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I had a Springer that went blind. Key for us was keeping the furniture etc. in place. Sniffer walks in the fields. He did remarkably well. Saying that we always had an eye out for Buckwheat - my DH and I split the duties. He knew he was loved and how he used to come up to us begging a petting session which he always got. Admit that we did spoil him.
 

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If you haven't, please consider taking her to a veterinary ophthalmologist to be checked for the reason. Some vision issues will be painful, some may be treatable, some will need to be managed practically.

If she has been checked out and diagnosed, what was the diagnosis? That could make a difference in recommendations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
She had a senior wellness exam a month ago and I mentioned the blindness ( also a lack or response with hearing, as that is going too) and they said she was doing well. Her right eye has been an issue for some time, years in fact and it was been cloudy and meds have been prescribed. It looks almost silver recently, not even cloudy. I plan to make a call to get a referral to have her looked at. She’s still spunky and wnjoys many things especially her little tennis balls and chasing the cats. 🐩
 
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