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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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From the NY Times:

Now professional dog trainers are all booked up. While you wait, they have some advice to share.​

NYT has a great article this morning for new puppy guardians. It's worrisome to read about a 10 week waitlist for trainers.
We know that owners delay calling for help when a problem arises, and I can only imagine how the situation has escalated over the 2.5 month wait. Even with regular training and socialization, it sounds similar to what my family in NYC go through with their kids, applying to preschools years in advance.
 

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That was a good article. Thanks for sharing it. I’m feeling somewhat confident that most of the pandemic dogs are going to keep their families. 🤞
 

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We are getting lots of calls at my club related to these issues. It is good to see that people are asking for help rather than turning the pups in to shelters and rescues.
 

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This part had me scratching my head:

“Many dog trainers have resumed in-person sessions but have modified their routines. Some offer no-contact training, where they give the dog owners instructions while wearing masks and staying six feet apart — allowing owners to take a more hands-on role in training their pet.”

Is that not.....normal? Because I feel like that’s how training usually works. No? Obviously not the mask part, but the owners taking a hands-on role.

I must be really out of touch.
 

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PeggytheParti,

Much depends on where you & are what type of training you signed up for. I have done group classes where owners expected me to handle the dogs through teaching the basics & then they would take over & I'd have to train them how to do it. I've had other classes where it was like, "NO don't touch my leash just tell me how". I could almost always tell when I was in an area that had heavy handed trainers. Almost always if the handler is having trouble, a trainer can usually take the leash for a moment & work through an issue or demonstrate to the owner how to do certain things. Sort of here, watch me... see where the leash is, see where my hands are. When I start walking & I want my dog to go with me I step off with the right foot but if I want the dog to stay I step off with the left foot" that sort of deal. Some people learn better by seeing something done first then they take over & you hep correct where they need advice. I can not imagine behind in a mask where the dog & the human can't read your facial cues... then I'm gonna stand 6 feet away & not touch the leash or the dog. That'd be the exercise in frustration for me. Where I started out 90% of the people wanted to drop their dog off & come back in 2 weeks. We were vet recommended & had built a reputation where I didn't refer people to past clients, the vets did so if they said good or bad about us, they had anonymity. I do know that's why so many people trusted us & we worked very hard not to betray or bruise that trust. A lot of people used us a boarding facility where their dogs were trained when they went on vacation. So it depends on where you are & what's normal. In another place I worked
 

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I also loved that novice owners were seeking help. Train the humans and recalibrate expectations of a puppy, will save many from spots in shelters. My husband’s friend is a show breeder of Cane Corsos, and while I was not inclined to be a fan, never, ever a dog for me, I see what they were meant to look like and behave like. That takes skill and time, as with all dogs. His pandemic litter is now ready to go and when I read the article I thought of his new owners and hope they are up for a Giant, and if not will seek a certified trainer.
 

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This part had me scratching my head:

“Many dog trainers have resumed in-person sessions but have modified their routines. Some offer no-contact training, where they give the dog owners instructions while wearing masks and staying six feet apart — allowing owners to take a more hands-on role in training their pet.”

Is that not.....normal? Because I feel like that’s how training usually works. No? Obviously not the mask part, but the owners taking a hands-on role.

I must be really out of touch.

Our pandemic training is the opposite. Bb sometimes attends a drop off class. We get videos of him in class and zoom sessions while we work with him at home. It seems to be working. I mean, he's not going to win a title in obedience or anything but he seems to be getting the basics with the combo approach.
 

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Our pandemic training is the opposite. Bb sometimes attends a drop off class. We get videos of him in class and zoom sessions while we work with him at home. It seems to be working. I mean, he's not going to win a title in obedience or anything but he seems to be getting the basics with the combo approach.
I’m so glad that option is available to you! And also that it’s working. Nice to see so many people getting creative in the face of covid.
 
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